Author Topic: Pod defensive coloration (Caterpillar Mimicry) in the genus Pisum  (Read 81 times)

Andrew Barney

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https://www.researchgate.net/publication/275414737_Pod_and_seed_defensive_coloration_camouflage_and_mimicry_in_the_genus_Pisum

https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-319-42096-7_56


Interesting pod coloration in peas. I discovered this article with interesting caterpillar mimicry on pea pods after i learned that Pisum elatius and Pisum humile are conspecific with Pisum sativum. This may mean that crosses between P. sativum and these other two species may be relatively easy. With the new discovery that these species have interesting pod colors / patterns I am now highly interested in doing some crossing experiments with them.

Quote
Ben-Ze'ev and Zohary (1973)  who concluded that P. elatius and P. humile were conspecific with
 P. sativum. P. fulvum produced shrivelled hybrid seed with P. sativum while the
 reciprocal cross produced stunted and abnormal seedlings. Gritton and Wierz-
 bicka (1975) have carried out an embryological study of the intergeneric cross
 Pisum sativum x Vicia faba.

Andrew Barney

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So far I have not had luck with contact of the articles authors as they no longer had seed and they were not from a seed bank but instead were collected from the wild.

However the JIC SeedStor had several germplasm accessions which mention pod anthocyanin spots or stripes on top of green pod color.

JI1075
JI1794
JI1795
JI1854
JI2115
JI2695
JI2698
JI3149
JI3151
JI3155

Garrett Schantz

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Another note in there as well: "The mature pods of P. fulvum are also defended in many inflorescences by degenerated flowers that develop into sharp thorns. It seems that this species is still in the process of evolving this mechanical defense as the response to millennia of strong grazing pressure." Interesting trait...
 From what I can tell, the crosses between these species can be diffucult depending on the accession. Fertility and vigor can be pretty low as well in the F1s.
 Some nice information on breeding between the wild species. https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10722-018-0714-6
 There are even more by the same publisher here https://link.springer.com/search?dc.creator=%22O.%20E.+Kosterin%22
 JI1794 seems like a good one to attempt crosses with the other species, one of the articles mentioned F1 offspring from it did pretty well. Searching the accession online, it has been used quite a bit for breeding purposes.
 Not everything seems to agree on these being subspecies like the JIC Seedstor has some listed as. Lowered fertility in crosses, to me would say that these may not be subspecies as well. Being in the same genus they just probably cross relatively easily.
 Another fun link here. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6265838/
 Good luck with the breeding. 
 Pisum elatius and Pisum humile in particular are odd. Some are closely related to sativum, and some have difficulties crossing.
« Last Edit: 2020-10-14, 12:20:24 AM by Garrett Schantz »