Author Topic: Poor timing  (Read 849 times)

Diane Whitehead

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Poor timing
« on: 2020-08-25, 02:53:29 PM »
There might be more vegetables that time their seeds badly, but only two that I am growing.

Parsnip seeds are now mature, but it is too late to sow them for this winter, and the seeds aren't viable for long.

Leeks are the same.  it is fortunate that I have leeks that produce little bulbs on their roots, so I have perennial ones and don't have to worry about the slow seeds.
Victoria, British Columbia, Canada
cool mediterranean climate  warm dry summers, mild wet winters,  70 cm rain,   sandy soil

Richard Watson

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Re: Poor timing
« Reply #1 on: 2020-08-26, 12:17:24 AM »
Freezing parsnip seed will keep it viable for 10 years
Changeable climate manly during winter & spring - 500mm average yearly rainfall. 20 years of soil improvements plus sub soil top soil reversal means my garden beds are about half metre deep. Below that is 100's of metres of alluvial shingle

Diane Whitehead

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Re: Poor timing
« Reply #2 on: 2020-08-26, 09:11:19 AM »
That's where I will put the seeds, then, and I will have to buy some parsnips this winter.
Victoria, British Columbia, Canada
cool mediterranean climate  warm dry summers, mild wet winters,  70 cm rain,   sandy soil

Walk

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Re: Poor timing
« Reply #3 on: 2020-08-27, 06:47:17 AM »
We have the best crop of parsnips ever this year due to a tip from a friend. We planted at the end of October, before the ground freezes here in SE Minnesota. The seeds germinated first thing in the spring and are the biggest plants we've ever grown. They will probably be a bear to dig, but so much easier than spring seeding and trying to keep them moist as they slooowly germinate. Will not go back to spring seeding again.

Diane Whitehead

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Re: Poor timing
« Reply #4 on: 2020-08-27, 08:14:35 AM »
I wonder what would happen if I just let them sow themselves?  I have hundreds of seeds, so I can experiment -
some in the freezer to sow in the spring (if I remember), some to sow in October, as you did, and a lot to just let drop now.
Victoria, British Columbia, Canada
cool mediterranean climate  warm dry summers, mild wet winters,  70 cm rain,   sandy soil

Andrew Barney

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Re: Poor timing
« Reply #5 on: 2020-08-27, 08:23:27 AM »
makes me wonder what other crops would do fine with fall/winter seeding. I imagine many.

Steph S

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Re: Poor timing
« Reply #6 on: 2020-11-05, 07:34:40 PM »
I've noticed that European seed companies offer quite a few varieties for fall planting - including onions, carrots etc.   Interesting idea.
I tried planting perennial wheat here in September...  I was really thrilled to see them coming up, and then really sorry to see them disappeared, every last one.  :-[  Some pest was autumn hungry, I now have doubts about fall planting grains before the small denizens are all done for the year.    Six weeks before frost is when every creature is packing away whatever they can... 
I have the same issue with leeks here, that they flower too late and are too slow to produce seeds.   I can get seeds by digging a few leeks to overwinter in the greenhouse, then put them outside in their container in the spring.  They continue growing in the cold dark days, and the overwintered plants flower much sooner than usual.

reed

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Re: Poor timing
« Reply #7 on: 2020-11-06, 08:06:37 AM »
Onions do very well for me planted in summer or fall, I do it to select for more hardy and perennial types.  Carrots do pretty good too but I still haven't arrived at a proper timing to get both nice carrots and seeds.

I have a theory that has proven to be at least somewhat valid that the time to plant something is as soon as it matures seeds. Works great great for me with turnips, mustard, radishes, lettuce, onions. Except for the onions those all do fine planted anytime.

So far mixed, mostly poor results, with stuff in cabbage family but am trying again right now. I started my plants earlier this year and had to keep them covered against the cabbage worms but they look great now that the weather has cooled. I would prefer to find some that are  hardy on their own but have framework in place to easily cover if needed. Once I get an abundance of my own seed I can do more intense selection later.
« Last Edit: 2020-11-06, 08:08:19 AM by reed »