Author Topic: Poor timing  (Read 87 times)

Diane Whitehead

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Poor timing
« on: 2020-08-25, 02:53:29 PM »
There might be more vegetables that time their seeds badly, but only two that I am growing.

Parsnip seeds are now mature, but it is too late to sow them for this winter, and the seeds aren't viable for long.

Leeks are the same.  it is fortunate that I have leeks that produce little bulbs on their roots, so I have perennial ones and don't have to worry about the slow seeds.
Victoria, British Columbia, Canada
cool mediterranean climate  warm dry summers, mild wet winters,  70 cm rain,   sandy soil

Richard Watson

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Re: Poor timing
« Reply #1 on: 2020-08-26, 12:17:24 AM »
Freezing parsnip seed will keep it viable for 10 years
Changeable year round climate, less so summertime, warming winters - just under 500mm average yearly rainfall. 20 years of soil improvements plus sub soil top soil reversal means my garden beds are about half metre deep. Below that is 100's of metres of alluvial out wash from the Southern
alps.

Diane Whitehead

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Re: Poor timing
« Reply #2 on: 2020-08-26, 09:11:19 AM »
That's where I will put the seeds, then, and I will have to buy some parsnips this winter.
Victoria, British Columbia, Canada
cool mediterranean climate  warm dry summers, mild wet winters,  70 cm rain,   sandy soil

Walk

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Re: Poor timing
« Reply #3 on: 2020-08-27, 06:47:17 AM »
We have the best crop of parsnips ever this year due to a tip from a friend. We planted at the end of October, before the ground freezes here in SE Minnesota. The seeds germinated first thing in the spring and are the biggest plants we've ever grown. They will probably be a bear to dig, but so much easier than spring seeding and trying to keep them moist as they slooowly germinate. Will not go back to spring seeding again.

Diane Whitehead

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Re: Poor timing
« Reply #4 on: 2020-08-27, 08:14:35 AM »
I wonder what would happen if I just let them sow themselves?  I have hundreds of seeds, so I can experiment -
some in the freezer to sow in the spring (if I remember), some to sow in October, as you did, and a lot to just let drop now.
Victoria, British Columbia, Canada
cool mediterranean climate  warm dry summers, mild wet winters,  70 cm rain,   sandy soil

Andrew Barney

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Re: Poor timing
« Reply #5 on: 2020-08-27, 08:23:27 AM »
makes me wonder what other crops would do fine with fall/winter seeding. I imagine many.