Author Topic: Composite/compound in domestic? tomatoes  (Read 141 times)

Daniel C.

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Composite/compound in domestic? tomatoes
« on: 2020-06-11, 02:05:10 PM »
Recently I've noticed two of my mother's purchased tomato transplants have what I can only describe as compound or composite flowers. That is, multiple flowering bodies on one of the little growths usually for one flower, within a single cluster.

https://ibb.co/mHG62W9 This is a link to a picture of the flower

Other flowers on these plants are singular, and I've seen a composite with just two as well. All the flowers on these plants have exerted stigmas and larger flowers.

The two plants that have these traits are "Cherokee Chocolate," an OSSI off-type/sport of Cherokee purple, and Genuwine, an F1 of Brandywine and Genovese Costuloto.

Is this tetraploidy? A wild cross?

Andrew Barney

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Re: Composite/compound in domestic? tomatoes
« Reply #1 on: 2020-06-11, 09:23:44 PM »
i could be wrong since i am not a tomato nut other than wild tomato genetics, but i believe that is a trait commonly found in domestic tomatoes that also have large beefsteak fruits. I think it is associated with more locules in the fruit itself. But it shouldn't be polyploidy. Probably a form of fasciation.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Locule

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beefsteak_tomato

https://www.google.com/search?q=tomato+flower+fasciation
« Last Edit: 2020-06-11, 09:27:49 PM by Andrew Barney »

Joseph Lofthouse

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Re: Composite/compound in domestic? tomatoes
« Reply #2 on: 2020-06-11, 10:53:04 PM »

It is common in some cultivars, especially beefsteaks, for the first few flower clusters to have fused flowers like that. They typically form large, mis-shaped, cat-faced fruits. Many growers tell me that they cull those types of flowers/fruits, except for people who are in competitions to grow the largest tomatoes.


reed

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Re: Composite/compound in domestic? tomatoes
« Reply #3 on: 2020-06-12, 06:05:12 AM »
I've seen that a lot on large fruited types. Seems to me also that those kind tend to produce only a few fruits overall. Great big vines and only half dozen tomatoes per.  I have mostly stopped growing them.

Daniel C.

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Re: Composite/compound in domestic? tomatoes
« Reply #4 on: 2020-06-13, 03:50:00 AM »
So yes, it does appear to be ordinary fasciation. Given that these tomatoes have out-breeding type flowers, I will see how they do and attempt to save some seed.

Ben S.

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Re: Composite/compound in domestic? tomatoes
« Reply #5 on: 2020-06-30, 12:55:20 PM »
Iíve had a few of these flowers this year on my Falenís First Snow plants (a mutation of Cherokee Purple with variegated foliage).

Photos show the flowers a few weeks ago, and then fruits a few days ago. The two big fruits toward the left and bottom came out of the fused flower. In person, theyíre about twice as big as the others.