Author Topic: Drying squash  (Read 474 times)

Chance

  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 43
  • Karma: 5
    • View Profile
Drying squash
« on: 2020-04-28, 01:49:35 PM »
Is anyone selecting squash for drying ala Goldini.  Carol Deppe says fresh and dry flavor are very distinct so have to be selected for somewhat independently.   Iím thinking of trying with tromboncino for pest resistance, pepo is hit or miss here.  Could also bring some of the Korean summer moschata in the mix.  This would be an interesting  offshoot project for some of those pepo inter species crosses being posted about.

Diane Whitehead

  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 181
  • Karma: 21
    • View Profile
    • Email
Re: Drying squash
« Reply #1 on: 2020-04-29, 09:46:29 AM »
I am growing zucchini to try to re-create Goldini, and I will try eating any resulting squash raw, dried and cooked.  That is assuming they produce at least two fruit per plant so I have one to leave on for seed. 

I've never understood zucchini jokes - here, I'd grow one zucchini plant per person and we'd be able to eat zucchini every couple of weeks.

Victoria, British Columbia, Canada
cool mediterranean climate  warm dry summers, mild wet winters,  70 cm rain,   sandy soil

spacecase0

  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 62
  • Karma: 4
    • View Profile
Re: Drying squash
« Reply #2 on: 2020-04-30, 08:55:55 AM »
I dry zucchini,
when dried and then added to a soup, the flavor is just what I started with when fresh.

per plant production where I live (middle of california) is about one zucchini every one to 2 days
I have been breeding for larger plants the last 7 years and now, so my production is better than it use to be.
I plant 2 plants a person and generally that gives zucchini for breakfast every day.
this year I planted 10 plants a person so there should be extra to dry this year.

Diane Whitehead

  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 181
  • Karma: 21
    • View Profile
    • Email
Re: Drying squash
« Reply #3 on: 2020-04-30, 10:24:25 AM »
You haven't been overwhelmed. So it isn't that my yard won't grow zucchini well.

 Maybe some people sow the whole packet and that's why they produce more than they can use.
Victoria, British Columbia, Canada
cool mediterranean climate  warm dry summers, mild wet winters,  70 cm rain,   sandy soil

Ellendra

  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 33
  • Karma: 4
    • View Profile
Re: Drying squash
« Reply #4 on: 2020-04-30, 12:14:10 PM »
You haven't been overwhelmed. So it isn't that my yard won't grow zucchini well.

 Maybe some people sow the whole packet and that's why they produce more than they can use.

I'm guessing it's more than they eat one zucchini per week, even in summer. If each plant is producing one every day or two, and they have 3 plants, they would get overwhelmed pretty quickly.

I don't think the average American eats much summer squash. We're the weird ones. :)
Harsh winters, high winds. Temps on the edge between zones 4 and 5. Steep, north-facing slope. Soil is high in clay and rocks. Fast draining, which is a surprise for clay soil. Indicates a sandy/gravelly layer underneath.

Chance

  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 43
  • Karma: 5
    • View Profile
Re: Drying squash
« Reply #5 on: 2020-05-08, 10:29:13 AM »
Diane, keep us updated about your project. 

Space case, a drying squash as I mean is from Carol Deppe/Buffalo Bird Womanís approach, that is a large but not totally mature squash (obviously before the seeds harden). 

I had good luck with Tatume one year as a large summer squash.  I remember it being really good, a bit sweet.  But I kind of want to move away from pepo, or cross it into a cushaw or moschata for resistances. 

spacecase0

  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 62
  • Karma: 4
    • View Profile
Re: Drying squash
« Reply #6 on: 2020-05-08, 09:46:26 PM »
Buffalo Bird Woman was my motivation
I followed instructions.

and as far as production,
one zucchini plant gives me a fruit about every 1.5 days.
2 plants per person tends to overload someone by fall.
I planted 10 plants per person this year so that I will have something to dry this year,
and that also insures that I will have enough seeds for next year,