Author Topic: TPS 2020  (Read 576 times)

Richard Watson

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Re: TPS 2020
« Reply #15 on: 2020-04-26, 12:48:05 PM »
Great name Ellendra, problem is its only the odd tuber that has a pattern, most are white.

Here's another one dug last evening.

Changeable year round climate, less so summertime, warming winters - just under 500mm average yearly rainfall. 20 years of soil improvements plus sub soil top soil reversal means my garden beds are about half metre deep. Below that is 100's of metres of alluvial out wash from the Southern
alps.

whwoz

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Re: TPS 2020
« Reply #16 on: 2020-04-26, 01:19:50 PM »
Some ripen tubers there Richard, magnificent colouration

nathanp

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Re: TPS 2020
« Reply #17 on: 2020-04-26, 01:24:29 PM »
Great name Ellendra, problem is its only the odd tuber that has a pattern, most are white.

Here's another one dug last evening.


What type of soil do you grow these in?  Tuber flesh color can vary quite a bit depending on soil type, mineral content, and soil warmth. 

Richard Watson

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Re: TPS 2020
« Reply #18 on: 2020-04-26, 02:04:45 PM »
 I have a dedicated area only for potatoes which are split into four sections, every year there will be always two sections in Coxford and Praire grass, so each section will spend two years in grass. No cultivation apart from hand planting and harvesting.
Past TPS plants can survive two years before another rotation of crop. They are amazingly tough plants, I know of a TPS patch close to my western shelter tree line of Pinus Radiata, the ground close to these trees gets bone dry in summer, its incredible that can survive there, yet it pops every year and hangs in there through summer, its been growing in that same spot for 12-13 years.

The last photo is a patch ive left to build for three years, purple leaf tips white flower, a TPS from a clone I named 'mystery', had no lucky learning who breed it. It grew 100% solid purple inside, large roundish tubers, incredibly earthy taste. I still have this clone and have 8-9 tubers in the bag for spring. Its seed throws three distinctive types, one throw back exactly the same as the parent Urenika, another produced a red flesh clone and the third produced a boring white tasteless clone.   
Changeable year round climate, less so summertime, warming winters - just under 500mm average yearly rainfall. 20 years of soil improvements plus sub soil top soil reversal means my garden beds are about half metre deep. Below that is 100's of metres of alluvial out wash from the Southern
alps.

Richard Watson

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Re: TPS 2020
« Reply #19 on: 2020-04-26, 02:25:00 PM »
Looking at the soil types map its regraded as a Pallic soil where I am, 100m to our north it changes to a Brown-stoney soil, 10 kms to the SE and to the coast the soils become Malanic.
Changeable year round climate, less so summertime, warming winters - just under 500mm average yearly rainfall. 20 years of soil improvements plus sub soil top soil reversal means my garden beds are about half metre deep. Below that is 100's of metres of alluvial out wash from the Southern
alps.

nathanp

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Re: TPS 2020
« Reply #20 on: 2020-04-26, 06:41:44 PM »
I have a dedicated area only for potatoes which are split into four sections, every year there will be always two sections in Coxford and Praire grass, so each section will spend two years in grass. No cultivation apart from hand planting and harvesting.
Past TPS plants can survive two years before another rotation of crop. They are amazingly tough plants, I know of a TPS patch close to my western shelter tree line of Pinus Radiata, the ground close to these trees gets bone dry in summer, its incredible that can survive there, yet it pops every year and hangs in there through summer, its been growing in that same spot for 12-13 years.

The last photo is a patch ive left to build for three years, purple leaf tips white flower, a TPS from a clone I named 'mystery', had no lucky learning who breed it. It grew 100% solid purple inside, large roundish tubers, incredibly earthy taste. I still have this clone and have 8-9 tubers in the bag for spring. Its seed throws three distinctive types, one throw back exactly the same as the parent Urenika, another produced a red flesh clone and the third produced a boring white tasteless clone.

Urenika, by the way, has been genetically tested as being identical to North American tubers names Purple Peruvian / Elmer's Blue, and the European clone Vitellote Grande.  The same potato, with possible regional epigenetic changes or mutations.

This is a picture of a Chilean landrace potato called Papa Chonca, grown in three different soils a few years ago.

Those on the left were grown in a sandy loam, those in the middle in mostly sand, and those on the right in a soil with high clay content. 
https://scontent-bos3-1.xx.fbcdn.net/v/t31.0-8/906114_856538201134404_934835441858913494_o.jpg?_nc_cat=101&_nc_sid=07e735&_nc_ohc=UL7IrXYfThIAX85f-o9&_nc_ht=scontent-bos3-1.xx&oh=0704363696cb35053e860c7c42cd8941&oe=5ECCBA25

I am growing out some potatoes descended from your MYSTERY clone.  I think now I am two generations out from it and have a few fairly fertile potatoes. 

My WHATUMAWHERO tuber is from WendyM's WHEROROA, and is a light pink skinned potato that produces a good yield of mostly 2-2.5" potatoes with yellow flesh that sometimes has a bit of pink in it.

https://www.facebook.com/groups/KenoshaPotatoProject/permalink/10155937101142859/

This is a seedling from WHATUMAWHERO that I will be evaluating this year.  It is yellow flesh and the skin is darker than the parent.
https://scontent-bos3-1.xx.fbcdn.net/v/t1.0-9/s960x960/93794836_2866009330187271_7524273976600690688_o.jpg?_nc_cat=103&_nc_sid=1480c5&_nc_ohc=Wb6hHxTv0Q4AX_zB8K3&_nc_ht=scontent-bos3-1.xx&_nc_tp=7&oh=d6e6a5323ce2f87ebfa1c24e2d9ebdf9&oe=5EC9CC7A

« Last Edit: 2020-04-26, 06:48:16 PM by nathanp »

Richard Watson

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Re: TPS 2020
« Reply #21 on: 2020-04-27, 03:31:33 AM »
Yes I knew Purple Peruvian was the same as Urenika, I dont like it myself and wont grow it.

That's amazing the colour differences with Papa Chonca,, any idea what soil type produced the dark purple.
Changeable year round climate, less so summertime, warming winters - just under 500mm average yearly rainfall. 20 years of soil improvements plus sub soil top soil reversal means my garden beds are about half metre deep. Below that is 100's of metres of alluvial out wash from the Southern
alps.

nathanp

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Re: TPS 2020
« Reply #22 on: 2020-04-27, 05:38:10 AM »
Yes I knew Purple Peruvian was the same as Urenika, I dont like it myself and wont grow it.

That's amazing the colour differences with Papa Chonca,, any idea what soil type produced the dark purple.

The area that was grown in was inside the foundation of what may have been something like a potter's work area.  It has a lot of clay content in the soil, which is highly unusual for this area.  I have no idea what it is, other than the color is gray. 

Ferdzy

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Re: TPS 2020
« Reply #23 on: 2020-05-12, 02:34:58 PM »
We have quite a few seedlings in a tray waiting for the weather to get a hair warmer before we plant them out, assuming we can pry them out without killing them. The dandelions bloomed, but then it snowed. Tomorrow should be a better day and then we are straight into summer directly from winter; not exactly unheard of.

Here are the few potatoes that we have saved from 2 or 3 years of growing out seed. I think only one is actually all that interesting to me. The ones in the top right, which are an offspring of Pink Fir Apple. I'm gratified to see that in addition to being about the largest, and the tastiest, they are the best keepers after a winter in paper bags in the basement. I'm not sure they are the best producers, but they are decent.


Lauren

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Re: TPS 2020
« Reply #24 on: 2020-05-12, 05:18:26 PM »
Perhaps not TPS related specifically, but I ran a test this spring. I broke off the sprouts of our seed potatoes and planted them straight in the ground rather than keeping a piece of the potato. They rooted and popped up, no problems, and some had tiny potatoes on them when I transplanted them into their final place. I still need to find out how the production compares, but it looks good so far.