Author Topic: Coronavirus altering your gardening plans?  (Read 1341 times)

William S.

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Re: Coronavirus altering your gardening plans?
« Reply #15 on: 2020-04-08, 06:42:36 PM »
Most corn sold for animal feed is GMO if not certified organic.

I only have flour corn seed as I haven't grown flint in a long time. Can't grow it this year have a sweet corn contract. I have a few kinds with some LR style mixing. Painted Mountain, Papas Blue, Arikara White, and Lofthouse. You want I should send you some? You are in Colorado right? The seed library's coming to pick up my excess saturday. If rather send it to you.
Western Montana garden, glacial lake Missoula sediment lacustrian silty clay mollisoil sometimes with added sand in places. Zone 6A with 100 to 130 frost free days

Andrew Barney

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Re: Coronavirus altering your gardening plans?
« Reply #16 on: 2020-04-09, 12:17:27 AM »
My plans have not changed at all. :)

 I'm pretty aloof when it comes to being plugged into society, and as such I'm a fairly independent outsider when it comes to people in general. Especially fads and mass hysteria. Not really my thing, so I usually just go about my own agenda regardless of the state of other people. They can do what they want as it usually has no bearing on me.

Someday when I have my own place i will definitely be planting a large orchard or two though, making sure I have a good self sustaining water access, and perhaps putting in a fish pond. Water will be the new gold. Or perhaps the new toilet paper? someday.

I got my watermelon patch seeds planted. Just direct seeded one of the new raised beds here at the rental house. No water, just dry seeds planted (for now).

Got to figure out how I'm going to plant my other peas, beans, tomatoes,  potatoes, etc in the space that is left. Need to buy a few garden hoses, but avoiding the hardware stores for now as I don't like how they are forcing everyone to go through long lines and through one exit.

Working from home is an interesting experience. In some ways it great,  in most ways its terrible. But that is a separate matter irrespective of gardening and plant breeding.

Woody Gardener

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Re: Coronavirus altering your gardening plans?
« Reply #17 on: 2020-04-09, 10:06:50 AM »
"I want to get started with grain corn, but have never done anything with it before. Do any of you have advice as to how to start, what varieties might do well with little care, flint vs flour, what would happen if I bought whole grain grinding corn or popcorn and planted it, etc? I'm sort on funds, thus the attraction of buying corn meant for eating (or chicken feed!) and growing it. Would I just get a big jump start on landrace starting? If I was concerned about GMO contamination (I'm not sure if I am) are there any GMO flint corns?"

I have been growing some heirloom dent corns for some time. 3 'moonshiner corns' noted for their ability to grow and produce despite heat, drought, and poor soil: Jellicorse Twin, Neil's Paymaster, and Looney along with Blue Clarage for anthocyanin. This year I'm adding Joseph Lofthouse's Harmony Grain corn.

White is recessive to all colors so I select any colored kernels growing on the moonshine corns. I am growing a lot this year to share seeds with my neighbors as I suspect they will be asking for seed in a few months.

Diane Whitehead

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Re: Coronavirus altering your gardening plans?
« Reply #18 on: 2020-04-09, 12:29:54 PM »
Andrew,

Carol Deppe in The Tao of Vegetable Gardening  combines plants that get harvested at different times. 

for instance:   winter squash and kale that will be eaten after the squash is harvested, plus peas around the edges. She also grows peas up those wire tomato cages.

I haven't grown watermelons.  Do you pick them all at once, or all through the season, like zucchini?  But maybe your peas could share the same bed, grown up the tomato cages.

Victoria, British Columbia, Canada
cool mediterranean climate  warm dry summers, mild wet winters,  70 cm rain,   sandy soil

reed

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Re: Coronavirus altering your gardening plans?
« Reply #19 on: 2020-04-09, 01:30:47 PM »
Watermelons don't ripen all at exactly the same time but season is much less spread out than zucchini. I used to just plant one or two kinds but now I have a varied mix so harvest is more extended.

Ellendra

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Re: Coronavirus altering your gardening plans?
« Reply #20 on: 2020-04-09, 02:15:10 PM »

 Do any of you have advice as to how to start, what varieties might do well with little care, flint vs flour, what would happen if I bought whole grain grinding corn or popcorn and planted it, etc?


When is your wet season? If your area tends to be wet in the spring but dry in the fall, flour corn should grow well for you. If it's wetter in the fall, I'd go with flint corn. I've never grown popping corn, but it seems like it would do better with a dry fall.

How do you like to eat your corn? Flint corn works better boiled, while flour corn tastes better baked. Dent corn tastes better if baked with a batter wet enough that it actually boils and then bakes.

Personally, I grow both a flint and a flour corn, alternating years.
Harsh winters, high winds. Temps on the edge between zones 4 and 5. Steep, north-facing slope. Soil is high in clay and rocks. Fast draining, which is a surprise for clay soil. Indicates a sandy/gravelly layer underneath.

reed

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Re: Coronavirus altering your gardening plans?
« Reply #21 on: 2020-04-10, 04:10:02 PM »
The pandemic has changed my plans some. More focus on what I consider staple crops dry beans and sweet potatoes for example. I'm still growing everything but more or less in a landrace fashion, not that it is really much different than I had already been doing. Most specific breeding where I'm chasing specific traits is out the window for now.

Corn is an exception where I still want to select for a short season flint with other specific attributes, still I might not be as picky on that this year as I had planned.

Sweet potatoes is another exception, primary goal there is reliable production from true seed and that goal remains unchanged.

Lauren

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Re: Coronavirus altering your gardening plans?
« Reply #22 on: 2020-04-12, 07:19:00 PM »
The plans have been altered, but not because of COVID. My brother and his family will be moving here in a few months, so I've switched over to more food production and fewer "projects." Onions and sweet potatoes will be the same (since I already had them started), mostly everything else will be put on hold. Our dry beans will be kidneys instead of the beginnings of the dry bean landrace, green bean landrace will also be on hold. Of course the watermelon proto-landrace will continue (no need to change that) with one new variety mixed in. Everything else will go to straight food production.

William S.

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Re: Coronavirus altering your gardening plans?
« Reply #23 on: 2020-04-12, 10:20:12 PM »
Why are so many of us assuming our breeding projects are incompatible with food production? Is this just an assumption. I clearly recall in Carol's Breed Your Own Vegetable Varieties her saying something like you can eat your mistakes/rejects/culls...

How do we continue to breed with food production in mind?

The wild tomato crosses I hoped to spend huge resources on this year are definitely going to throw some inedible/unpalatable/unproductive stuff. So my thought is grow some more of crosses that are likely to be productive. Like only a few cherry tomatoes, lots of beefsteaks. Still going to grow a lot of the wild crosses, certainly all I've started. I just might not direct seed more and more of them.
Western Montana garden, glacial lake Missoula sediment lacustrian silty clay mollisoil sometimes with added sand in places. Zone 6A with 100 to 130 frost free days

reed

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Re: Coronavirus altering your gardening plans?
« Reply #24 on: 2020-04-13, 02:47:16 AM »
Tomatoes is the primary place I'm cutting back this year. I have several of which I intended to plant in larger numbers to screen for disease resistance. Instead I'm devoting that space to more beans and sweet potatoes.
My water and musk melon seeds are getting old so I'm still gonna find a spot for them too. 

Ferdzy

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Re: Coronavirus altering your gardening plans?
« Reply #25 on: 2020-04-13, 06:45:49 AM »
This is the one time of year when I tend to buy a certain amount of vegetables. There's some sprouts of lettuce and spinach in the garden. I used the last stored carrot yesterday, and the cabbage is about to run out. The squash is history, and potatoes and sweet potatoes are running low. We have frozen veg, but they too are a noticeably smaller pile than they were.

It's hard to get groceries. At the best of times, our local grocery tends to not get everything they order*. There are certain times of the week where things are more likely to be in, and I'm having a hard time slotting myself in there because I have not yet adjusted to the idea that I need to place my order a good 2 weeks in advance. So, there will be no lettuce-y salads this week. (Whine, whine, whine.) Okay, got that off my chest.


*Oddly enough, I think it's because they are the only store in town. I suspect that the warehouse sends short-supply items to towns where there is a competitor, to keep people from going to the other one.

Gilbert Fritz

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Re: Coronavirus altering your gardening plans?
« Reply #26 on: 2020-04-13, 10:14:49 AM »
Most of my breeding projects are likely to produce less food than other plantings; I'm working with citron/watermelons, overwintering breeding where most plants don't survive, dahilas, wild tomatoes, wild (toxic) squash, wild, slow growing sweet potato relatives, black walnut seedlings, etc. Some of them might produce food but are experimental and might not produce the food we'd like.

Lauren

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Re: Coronavirus altering your gardening plans?
« Reply #27 on: 2020-04-13, 07:00:26 PM »
Why are so many of us assuming our breeding projects are incompatible with food production?

In my case the breeding is very much  compatible with food production. I just don't have space for my projects as well as food for six additional people. So those projects that were already planted when we found out they would be moving in (onions, dry beans, sweet potatoes) will continue. The space allocated for other projects (rice, barley, new landraces) is being repurposed to grow larger amounts of the traditional crops.

gmuller

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Re: Coronavirus altering your gardening plans?
« Reply #28 on: 2020-04-13, 07:21:09 PM »
Business as usual here - made sure I had lots of straw and manure for compost early on, and the carrot, parsnip beet leek and onion projects all seeded.
The only change is distributing my excess produce - i would normally give it away to my student workers or their households, but everyone has left town, and im not going out anyway. What i have done is call a few friends, and just set them loose in the kitchen garden for rhubarb, tomatoes, eggplants peppers and chillis. and im composting a whole lot of melons after taste testing. I was going to put a free food table in the street, but i don't want to advertise that i have a productive garden :(
GM

Ferdzy

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Re: Coronavirus altering your gardening plans?
« Reply #29 on: 2020-04-13, 07:43:16 PM »
gmuller, I don't know if it is too late, or if it is something you can do, but melon dries amazingly well and makes a delicious snack.