Author Topic: Tetsukabuto croce  (Read 2175 times)

Adrian

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Re: Tetsukabuto croce
« Reply #30 on: 2020-10-27, 11:03:26 AM »
What is the difference between this three fruits?

I will wait one month before to harvest the lasts fruits appeared mid september.
« Last Edit: 2020-10-27, 04:21:54 PM by Adrian »

Adrian

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Re: Tetsukabuto croce
« Reply #31 on: 2020-10-28, 02:01:08 PM »
I don't know if the male fertility would restaurated if i sow the seeds of each fruits.
 
The possibles male pollinating was red kury, waltham, violino rugosa and blue of hungary.
« Last Edit: 2020-10-28, 02:13:21 PM by Adrian »

Joseph Lofthouse

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Re: Tetsukabuto croce
« Reply #32 on: 2020-10-28, 10:04:46 PM »
My experience is that descendants of Tetsukabuto F1 crosses undergo normal segregation, and that male fertility is restored.
List of places that carry my seeds is at: http://garden.lofthouse.com/seed-list.phtml

Adrian

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Re: Tetsukabuto croce
« Reply #33 on: 2020-11-05, 02:59:48 PM »
The descendants of Tetsukabuto f1 are generally vigorous?
Its just for have an idea with the density of the seedling.
« Last Edit: 2020-11-05, 03:03:29 PM by Adrian »

William S.

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Re: Tetsukabuto croce
« Reply #34 on: 2020-11-08, 10:14:18 AM »
Adrian,

I grew Tetsukabuto also this year with Lofthouse buttercup and the G2 descendents of Autumn's choice F1.

I've grown Joseph's Maximoss before and it produced but I think it wasn't great but then some portions of my squash patch tend to get ignored. I still have some seed I saved and I kind of let it cross freely with the Maxima grex so some genes could be floating around.

I have a lot of space though so what I will probably do is plant the remaining Maximoss seed. All or at least a great deal of the new Tetsukabuto seed. Then also will plant G3 of Autumn's choice descendants and probably some lofthouse buttercup just for eating unless I find a place to isolate the latter.
Western Montana garden, glacial lake Missoula sediment lacustrian silty clay mollisoil sometimes with added sand in places. Zone 6A with 100 to 130 frost free days

Adrian

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Re: Tetsukabuto croce
« Reply #35 on: 2020-11-08, 10:59:58 AM »
 Wiliam,
If i have a crossbreeding with violino rugosa i think that he would increase the weight of the fruit and given an exceptional taste.
I don't  unfortunaly grow the buttercup but i Think its great!


« Last Edit: 2020-11-08, 01:02:16 PM by Adrian »

Adrian

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Re: Tetsukabuto croce
« Reply #36 on: 2020-11-14, 10:03:11 AM »
How day are required after thr fecondation of a fruit of tetsukabuto for have seed able to germinate.
60 days is low?

Adrian

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Re: Tetsukabuto croce
« Reply #37 on: 2020-11-16, 02:43:25 PM »
The rugosa gene of violino rugosa is dominant or recesiv, i would like transmited this gene!

Adrian

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Re: Tetsukabuto croce
« Reply #38 on: 2020-11-21, 07:05:50 AM »
Harvest of the lasts tetsukabutos but they are unfortunately take the freez at -3C 26,6F.

Adrian

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Re: Tetsukabuto croce
« Reply #39 on: 2020-12-27, 01:00:57 PM »
For sow the seeds recuperate of the tetsukabuto fruits,Must i take of precautions compared at a conventional seed?

Adrian

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Re: Tetsukabuto croce
« Reply #40 on: 2021-02-06, 08:35:56 AM »
I have open one fruit of tetsukabuto and i have found 30 seeds  viable in the fruit.They are tall.
« Last Edit: 2021-02-06, 02:57:10 PM by Adrian »

Ferdzy

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Re: Tetsukabuto croce
« Reply #41 on: 2021-02-06, 08:45:59 AM »
Sounds like good news!

Adrian

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Re: Tetsukabuto croce
« Reply #42 on: 2021-02-06, 09:03:36 AM »


Who is the parent?I am very curious.
« Last Edit: 2021-02-06, 09:10:36 AM by Adrian »

William S.

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Re: Tetsukabuto croce
« Reply #43 on: 2021-02-06, 06:35:33 PM »
I've been holding off on the Tetsukabuto F1 and focusing on other squashes. So I opened two. The first even though it stored nicely was not ripe enough and had no viable seed. The second had lots of viable seeds and was much riper.

Ten more to open.
« Last Edit: 2021-02-07, 12:10:49 AM by William S. »
Western Montana garden, glacial lake Missoula sediment lacustrian silty clay mollisoil sometimes with added sand in places. Zone 6A with 100 to 130 frost free days

Adrian

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Re: Tetsukabuto croce
« Reply #44 on: 2021-02-09, 02:42:33 PM »
Why a few seeds look like more flat after to have dried?
« Last Edit: 2021-02-09, 02:51:00 PM by Adrian »