Author Topic: Rocky Mountain Raspberry Breeding Project  (Read 284 times)

Andrew Barney

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Rocky Mountain Raspberry Breeding Project
« on: 2020-02-26, 12:09:28 PM »
For those who donít know, Iím slowly forging ahead with my long term wild raspberry breeding project. The project will center around the Rubus Subgenus / Clade Anaplobatus, which includes (R. bartonianus, R. deliciosus, R. neomexicanus, R.odoratus, R. parviflorus, R. trilobus).

My project will revolve mainly around improving / maintaining useful traits from Rubus deliciosus, but having high genetic diversity is also of high priority which means I will want as many different genetically different individuals within R. deliciosus (not just one clone representing the whole species), but also incorporating these other species as well. I guess similar to the big wild tomato project in some ways.

Of these other species, Rubus neomexicanus is highest on my list for procuring as it is basically a subspecies that thrives in dry southwestern areas such as utah, arizona, new mexico, and possibly Oklahoma. Rubus bartonianus is also highly related and is limited to a tiny area in idaho (and may not be diploid like the rest). Rubus trilobus is a conspecific version of rubus deliciosus native to the mesoamerican rocky mountains and is pretty much unavailable, but itís hybrid Rubus ĎBENENDENí is available commercially from Washington State and also popular in the UK.

Rubus deliciosus Ė The Rocky Mountain Raspberry is the one I have chosen to start this with because I love raspberries and I love native plants along with the fact that it is native to my area. When I tracked one down to buy commercially it happened to have a fruit. That fruit was literally the best tasting raspberry Iíve ever had.

Some of the traits that I would like to keep are:

really cool unique leaf shape (may be adapted to conserving moisture)
adapted to the Rocky Mountains
adapted to the North American southwest arid region
dark tasty fruit
large showy ornamental flowers
no spines or prickles

Some traits that might be worth breeding in from domestic raspberries:

large fruit that holds shape well
long keeping fruit traits
more fruit per bush
ever-bearing


Iíve had a few minor set backs, but thatís okay. First I have been unable to find anyone in southern utah, arizona, or new mexico willing to either go out and collect germplasm via seeds or root / rhizome cuttings or go to the one nursery that sells R. neomexicanus and ship it to Colorado. I requested some germplasm this last fall from the USDA, but I think my R. neomexicanus cuttings died so I will need to request at least those two again next September, which stinks.

For anyone willing to help go out and try collecting genetically diverse germplasm and hunt down old identified populations I have a list of GPS coordinates in various areas, including: Colorado, Utah, Wyoming, Arizona, New Mexico, and Oklahoma. I also just downloaded the GPS coordinates for Rubus Odoratus and R. parviflorus, which I think offhand grow in the North Eastern United States. I also downloaded GPS coordinate info for Rubus trilobus in mexico. If anyone is willing to help, I NEED YOUR HELP. ;)

triffid

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Re: Rocky Mountain Raspberry Breeding Project
« Reply #1 on: 2020-02-27, 03:10:50 AM »
Following this with great interest Andrew.  :)

You mention the ever-bearing trait, which I assume is present in primocane varieties? Is it a case of floricane vs primocane, with one dominant over the other?

I believe I've read, sometime in the past, that some commercial varieties over here in Britain have incorporated N. American wild Rubus genetics - I'll try to find the source.
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Andrew Barney

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Re: Rocky Mountain Raspberry Breeding Project
« Reply #2 on: 2020-02-27, 08:43:29 PM »
Following this with great interest Andrew.  :)

You mention the ever-bearing trait, which I assume is present in primocane varieties? Is it a case of floricane vs primocane, with one dominant over the other?

I believe I've read, sometime in the past, that some commercial varieties over here in Britain have incorporated N. American wild Rubus genetics - I'll try to find the source.

Thanks!

Yeah,  the primocane vs florocane thing was what I was basically referring to. I forget which is which.

I've read a few raspberry breeding books recently that I found pdfs of online. They said that originally before raspberries caught on commercially they imported raspberries from Europe since they were bigger and more productive,  but that they did breed them with the ones here to get them more cold hardy. I imagine they may have done the opposite at some point back in Europe.

Andrew Barney

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Re: Rocky Mountain Raspberry Breeding Project
« Reply #3 on: 2020-03-08, 04:07:51 PM »
Here's some GPS coordinate maps where these specimens can be found and collected. The greater map includes R. parviflorus which apparently can also be found in Colorado, Utah, Nevada, etc, which i did not know. So, that is very interesting.

I know there has been some misidentification along the way so some of these other overlapping ranges are interesting.

William S.

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Re: Rocky Mountain Raspberry Breeding Project
« Reply #4 on: 2020-03-08, 05:23:42 PM »
I have Rubus parviflorus and Rubus ideas both native and horticultural strain of the latter in my yard. Rubus leucodermis I see fairly often in the wild. There are other native Rubus in Montana but I've only seen them once or twice.

I get out to Washington state now and then and encounter salmon berry there, though rarely in fruit.

I would like to grow more Rubus seedlings from the several varieties in my yard just to see if anything interesting shakes out from insect pollination.
« Last Edit: 2020-03-08, 05:28:35 PM by William S. »
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Diane Whitehead

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Re: Rocky Mountain Raspberry Breeding Project
« Reply #5 on: 2020-03-08, 07:05:03 PM »
It sounds as though you don't want any from the Pacific coast.

My half acre has R spectabilis (Salmonberry),  R leucodermis (Blackcap), R. parviflorus (Thimbleberry), R ursinus (Trailing Blackberry) as well as the one that gives the biggest harvest:  R discolor aka R procerus (Himalayan Blackberry).

I could send pollen and seeds.
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Andrew Barney

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Re: Rocky Mountain Raspberry Breeding Project
« Reply #6 on: 2020-03-08, 08:43:26 PM »
It sounds as though you don't want any from the Pacific coast.

My half acre has R spectabilis (Salmonberry),  R leucodermis (Blackcap), R. parviflorus (Thimbleberry), R ursinus (Trailing Blackberry) as well as the one that gives the biggest harvest:  R discolor aka R procerus (Himalayan Blackberry).

I could send pollen and seeds.

Hi Diane,

Actually that's not the case,  though I am putting an emphasis on the ones closest to my area first.

I have GPS coordinates for R. Parviflorus and R. Odoratus that include areas of Oregon, Washington, Maryland, and the east coast, for each species respective range. I will upload in pdf form soon if anyone is interested in that data.

The main project is centered around the  Rubus Subgenus / Clade Anaplobatus.

But I did plant a salmon berry (R. spectabilis) plant from Alaska last fall, though i don't know if i will do any specific crosses with it.

I just planted seeds for R. leucodermis and I'm waiting to see if my R. parviflorus is indeed dead and I will need to find a replacement. Maybe you could help with that?!

But R. ursinus and others like it are not in the scope of this project.

I do have one plant of R. occidentalis, and from what I've read it has a very narrow genetic base and could be improved greatly if hybridized with R. leucodermis. Sounds like there has only ever been one variety that tried that. Strange as that sounds.

Diane Whitehead

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Re: Rocky Mountain Raspberry Breeding Project
« Reply #7 on: 2020-03-08, 08:47:07 PM »
Too bad you're not using ursinus.  It is definitely the best tasting and has been used to create my favourite hybrid - Cascade, which is the first to ripen and tastes great also.
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