Author Topic: Diploid Ipomoea Breeding  (Read 71 times)

S.Simonsen

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Diploid Ipomoea Breeding
« on: 2018-10-25, 10:06:04 PM »
Ipomoea batatas is a remarkable crop but under my conditions (heavy soil, periodic droughts without irrigation) it is prone to pests and vermin and unreliable for giving useable crops. This form is a tetraploid that emerged somewhere in central or South America and spread around the world long ago, leading to inevitable bottle necks, though reasonable diversity exists.
The genus itself is highly diverse and composed mostly of diploids. Several of these species are edible to varying degrees, including several Australia native species (I. costata, abrupta, polpha) that grow in our semi-arid regions and were used as staple foraging crops by aborigines. Other species include I. cairica, pandurata, lacunosa, and other more obscure species around the world.
I am currently growing I. costata and abrupta to maturity for hybridisation with I. cairica that grows wild on my subtropical farm and makes excellent goat forage. My aim is to hybridise these species and I. lacunosa which occurs locally to develop a silvopasture compatible species that produces edible tubers. Any collaborators with access to other edible wild Ipomoea species would be most welcome as hybridisation compatibility is likely to be highly species dependent. Work to induce polyploidy in the wild diploid species is also a possible focus.

Gilbert Fritz

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Re: Diploid Ipomoea Breeding
« Reply #1 on: 2018-10-27, 05:14:31 PM »
I'm interested in this. I grew two American native tuberous Ipomoea this year, I. lacunosa and I. leptophylla. Only the former grew well, but I didn't see any tubers on the roots. I've been trying in vain to find seeds for I. costata in the USA. Another American species that has a large (somewhat) edible tuber is I. pandurata. There is much confusion as to the actual edibility and palatability of all the American species.

Watching bindweed strangle my gardens, I've always had dreams of an edible version!

S.Simonsen

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Re: Diploid Ipomoea Breeding
« Reply #2 on: 2018-10-27, 07:02:12 PM »
Sounds like we could work together on this. I can track down some I. costata here to send you. Any of the species you mentioned would be of interest to me in return. PM me if you want to follow this up.

reed

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Re: Diploid Ipomoea Breeding
« Reply #3 on: 2018-10-28, 02:48:24 AM »
I found some interesting info on i  pandurata, http://www.nomadseed.com/2017/12/mecha-meck-the-wild-sweet-potato-vine-ipomoea-pandurata/. It says, among other things that only the young roots are really good to eat.


I haven't grown it yet but know of several wild specimens and have collected plenty of seeds. I'm very interested in trying to cross it to i batatas but it's hard having to make the long walk or drives to the wild plants to collect pollen. I'll get some plants started next year but the link above says it takes a few years to start flowering.


I'm not much interested in working with other species and I don't like to send seeds outside the US but if someone in the US wants some to  forward on in trades send me a private message.