Author Topic: Indoor growing test  (Read 110 times)

Lauren

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Indoor growing test
« on: 2020-02-04, 05:28:40 PM »
I want to breed some varieties that will grow well in limited light, like a southern window. I'm thinking beets, onions, parsnips or turnips for the first test, but I think the roots of parsnips and turnips will grow too long.

I've grown beets (they did fantastic under the corn last year) and onions, but I've never grown turnips or parsnips. Any ideas what would be best to try first? This first year is basically figuring out the process. I do have seeds for all four, and I know I'll have a high failure rate.

William S.

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Re: Indoor growing test
« Reply #1 on: 2020-02-04, 07:00:21 PM »
I never grew turnips and parsnips either. Until 2011. They never left. Just keep volunteering. Kral from adaptive seeds is a short root parsnip. Parsnip can famously be dug all winter though. From the outdoors. I think thats how Elliot Coleman does it. 
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Andrew Barney

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Re: Indoor growing test
« Reply #2 on: 2020-02-05, 06:22:04 PM »
I'm not sure, but i would say stick to your gut instincts on what might work best. Try and see. If it's a failure then oh well, you can try again and again. No shame in that. This actually sounds like a really cool idea / project. Let us know how it turns out!

spacecase0

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Re: Indoor growing test
« Reply #3 on: 2020-02-05, 07:23:47 PM »
parsnips are one of the few crops I have seen do well in low light levels.
don't give up on it for the deep roots.

William S.

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Re: Indoor growing test
« Reply #4 on: 2020-02-05, 09:58:50 PM »
parsnips are one of the few crops I have seen do well in low light levels.
don't give up on it for the deep roots.

https://www.adaptiveseeds.com/product/vegetables/parsnips/parsnip-kral-russian-organic/
Western Montana garden, glacial lake Missoula sediment lacustrian silty clay mollisoil sometimes with added sand in places. Zone 6A with 100 to 130 frost free days

Lauren

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Re: Indoor growing test
« Reply #5 on: 2020-02-06, 09:00:25 AM »
I decided to use beets first--I'm familiar with their habits, how they should look as seedlings, and how they work in the main garden. This first test (I ended up with three buckets) is to figure out the how. Once I have the pattern down I'll move on to other things. I have five "seeds" in each bucket and  should get two or more seedlings from each seed. Theoretically I'll have between 30 and 50 seedlings for the first test. I'm looking for a 10% survival rate, but if one survives to produce seeds I've got a good start.

Lauren

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Re: Indoor growing test
« Reply #6 on: 2020-02-06, 09:02:44 AM »
parsnips are one of the few crops I have seen do well in low light levels.
don't give up on it for the deep roots.
I figured the root crops would be the best to start with. The beets did well under the corn last year, so I'll start with that and go to parsnips after I have the details worked out.

Steph S

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Re: Indoor growing test
« Reply #7 on: 2020-02-06, 01:18:47 PM »
I grow indoors under lights every winter, and I think you should just try whatever you like, maybe find some surprise successes.   I mostly grow greens of various kinds, but I have tried a few other things.   Bush beans and cukes one year.  They didn't produce a lot, but it was nice to have them.  Low return for space though, cw greens.    I have tried and failed turnips (Hakurei) which simply didn't tolerate either the low light or the low relative humidity.  They were in the same container I've used in the greenhouse which they were fine with, so it wasn't the space.   Radishes grew tops well enough but nothing below ground.   
Brassicas have a lot of promise indoors.  They grow faster than lettuce, for leaf (kale, mizuna etc, arugula too).
Bok Choy - especially tolerant of low light and short days, I think they would grow in a window without extra light. 
Yu Choy Sum - great for indoors.  They like to be crowded and grow really fast.  30-40 day crop and you can get a couple of cuts.
Gai Lan  and Michihili - slow to develop at first but lots of eating off them once they get to a decent size.  Bigger pot is better.

I would like to try dwarf peas.   Norli is a really short snow pea that puts out a lot of peas, but we didn't find them sweet enough - still I'm tempted to try them under lights.   I have not been able to grow early peas in my greenhouse, they don't like the extremes.

In the root crops, I met a guy who said he was growing carrots indoors in a 5 gal bucket all year round.  That may be worth trying too.

Please let us know how you make out with the beets.  :)