Author Topic: Article: GMO Spicy Tomato  (Read 352 times)

William S.

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Western Montana garden, glacial lake Missoula sediment lacustrian silty clay mollisoil sometimes with added sand in places. Zone 6A with 100 to 130 frost free days

gmuller

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Re: Article: GMO Spicy Tomato
« Reply #1 on: 2020-01-12, 11:18:49 PM »
What a load of frog shit. Is this really among the best innovations they can find for GMOs? Tomatoes easier to grow than chillis? My chillis sail through cold that kills tomatoes, they never suffered any of the myriad endemic diseases that were in my last garden, that killed tomatoes in mid season, and so what if i have to add a teaspoon of one extra ingredient to make a spicy sauce?  "Oh shit, I just had to put a teaspoon of chilli flakes in my sauce, I so exhausted now i have to go and have a lie down..." FFS.
G

Richard Watson

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Re: Article: GMO Spicy Tomato
« Reply #2 on: 2020-01-13, 10:39:28 AM »
What a load of frog shit. Is this really among the best innovations they can find for GMOs? Tomatoes easier to grow than chillis? My chillis sail through cold that kills tomatoes, they never suffered any of the myriad endemic diseases that were in my last garden, that killed tomatoes in mid season, and so what if i have to add a teaspoon of one extra ingredient to make a spicy sauce?  "Oh shit, I just had to put a teaspoon of chilli flakes in my sauce, I so exhausted now i have to go and have a lie down..." FFS.
G
Changeable year round climate, less so summertime, warming winters - just under 500mm average yearly rainfall. 20 years of soil improvements plus sub soil top soil reversal means my garden beds are about half metre deep. Below that is 100's of metres of alluvial out wash from the Southern
alps.

reed

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Re: Article: GMO Spicy Tomato
« Reply #3 on: 2020-01-13, 11:27:10 AM »
I have little artificial garden pond which has been colonized by lots of frogs. The sludge I clean out of it each fall quite literally is, frog shit. It's great fertilizer. If they would GMO a frog that would instinctively go over to the garden to relieve itself saving me the effort of transport, that would be helpful.

Richard Watson

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Re: Article: GMO Spicy Tomato
« Reply #4 on: 2020-01-13, 12:00:08 PM »
The Australian tree frogs that have been in my pond for a few years have disappeared for some reason.
Changeable year round climate, less so summertime, warming winters - just under 500mm average yearly rainfall. 20 years of soil improvements plus sub soil top soil reversal means my garden beds are about half metre deep. Below that is 100's of metres of alluvial out wash from the Southern
alps.

reed

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Re: Article: GMO Spicy Tomato
« Reply #5 on: 2020-01-13, 07:48:02 PM »
The Australian tree frogs that have been in my pond for a few years have disappeared for some reason.
Well, actually we have less frogs than we used too. I'm sure it is because of times like right now when they should be snuggled in at the bottom they are out sitting around the edges looking for bugs that aren't there.

Richard Watson

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Re: Article: GMO Spicy Tomato
« Reply #6 on: 2020-01-14, 11:55:05 AM »


lack of insects is not the problem here, still seeing plenty of them, still not sure why they have disappeared though, thinking it might be the hedgehog as I'm sure they would feed on them, but then they do a great job on slugs and snails which I can do without, the tree frogs are none native so I'm not loosing sleep over there disappearance. 
Changeable year round climate, less so summertime, warming winters - just under 500mm average yearly rainfall. 20 years of soil improvements plus sub soil top soil reversal means my garden beds are about half metre deep. Below that is 100's of metres of alluvial out wash from the Southern
alps.

reed

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Re: Article: GMO Spicy Tomato
« Reply #7 on: 2020-01-14, 03:34:01 PM »
It's normal for insects to be absent in the middle of January, what isn't or at least didn't use to be normal is water warm enough to wake up the frogs, by rights there might be an a substantial layer of ice right now and it still may come. If it goes sub-zero F now as it is quite possible it will, those poor frogs are gonna have a rough time of. They've been awake spending calories looking for food, based on recent past years, I'll find some dead ones in a couple of months.

Rapid fluctuations and more extreme ones are what's messing with the frogs and the trees and lots of other things, including my garden, and the insects. I think I'm drifting a little from the topic of the thread, sorry.

Ellendra

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Re: Article: GMO Spicy Tomato
« Reply #8 on: 2020-01-15, 10:49:26 AM »
It's normal for insects to be absent in the middle of January,


Ohio vs New Zealand :)
Harsh winters, high winds. Temps on the edge between zones 4 and 5. Steep, north-facing slope. Soil is high in clay and rocks. Fast draining, which is a surprise for clay soil. Indicates a sandy/gravelly layer underneath.