Author Topic: ribed leaf leeks  (Read 126 times)

Richard Watson

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ribed leaf leeks
« on: 2019-11-28, 10:23:39 AM »
Quite taken by the wavy leaves that have turned up in my leek seed bed this spring, thinking I might save the seed from these as a point of difference.
Anyone had leeks do this?

Changeable year round climate with warming winters - just under 500mm average yearly rainfall. 20 years of soil improvements plus sub soil top soil reversal means my garden beds are about half metre deep. Below that is 100's of metres of alluvial out wash from the Southern
alps.

Ocimum

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Re: ribed leaf leeks
« Reply #1 on: 2019-11-28, 08:31:37 PM »
I have seen this. It seemed to me that the outer leaf enclosed the inner leaves, which were stuck, and thus grew this way when the outer leaf made way. Was a year or two back.

Richard Watson

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Re: ribed leaf leeks
« Reply #2 on: 2019-11-28, 09:19:13 PM »
Oh ok, so ya reckon its not a genetic trait?, thanks for that, mind you they are not the best plants in that block.
Something else that's showing up this year badly is rust in garlic, in fact all parts of New Zealand are increasingly suffering from it, it's now showing up in the leeks, but only some, I'm going to have to add this to the selection criteria. Ive often wondered if the increasing number of diseases that's popping are not been deliberately released by chemical industry, it would be certainly great for business.   
Changeable year round climate with warming winters - just under 500mm average yearly rainfall. 20 years of soil improvements plus sub soil top soil reversal means my garden beds are about half metre deep. Below that is 100's of metres of alluvial out wash from the Southern
alps.

reed

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Re: ribed leaf leeks
« Reply #3 on: 2019-11-29, 04:36:03 AM »
Interesting looking for sure but I also think it might be cause it got stuck for a bit as it grew. I'v seen similar on corn leaves.

We have new diseases and bugs here in NA on a regular basis, I've also wondered if "they" do it on purpose.

 

Ocimum

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Re: ribed leaf leeks
« Reply #4 on: 2019-11-29, 08:01:20 AM »
Oh ok, so ya reckon its not a genetic trait?, thanks for that, mind you they are not the best plants in that block.
Not necessarily: a too tight/closed outer leave in which the inner leaves get stuck might be genetic.
As an example some kale cannot reproduce without a human cutting open the leaves, allowing the inflorescence to get out. In nature, it would be a genetic defect as it doesn't allow reproduction of the plant.

Steph S

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Re: ribed leaf leeks
« Reply #5 on: 2019-11-29, 06:35:26 PM »
They do look interesting!  I guess you'll have to save their seed separately to find out if it is genetic.   Alternate day caging?

Between travel, import/export, and climate change including storm events blowing hither and yon, there are a zillion reasons for new pest and disease to turn up every day.    I'm always keeping an eye out for someone else's pest or plague... ::)

Richard Watson

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Re: ribed leaf leeks
« Reply #6 on: 2019-11-29, 09:07:47 PM »
Decided i wont be saving those three ribbed plants as they are not overly big, after all health, vigor and size are the most important accept when saving for seed. What you see in the photo is what's left after a late winter cull which saw about 10-15 dug out, about 10 more will be chopped out this evening including one of the large plants as its showing rust susceptibility. There's plenty of diversity having had a number Canadian and NZ varieties cross breed together, so I think I can get away with a bit of bottle neck pollination over the next month or so, I'll do a much larger lot next year though.
A bugger that the rust is now showing in the leeks after giving the garlic arse holes over the last few years, nothing in the perennial leeks or onions thank goodness though 

Changeable year round climate with warming winters - just under 500mm average yearly rainfall. 20 years of soil improvements plus sub soil top soil reversal means my garden beds are about half metre deep. Below that is 100's of metres of alluvial out wash from the Southern
alps.

Steph S

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Re: ribed leaf leeks
« Reply #7 on: 2019-11-30, 06:29:50 AM »
I heard about rust on garlic from a grower in the UK.   We do have rust here - I often see the local willows badly afflicted - but so far it has not affected any alliums.    It's great that you can select for resistance in your leeks.   It reminds me why it is so worthwhile to grow out many garlic varieties - you just don't know what conditions will come up, that make it harder on one than another.