Author Topic: Resources on breeding for illiterate farmers  (Read 391 times)

Joseph Lofthouse

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Re: Resources on breeding for illiterate farmers
« Reply #15 on: 2019-11-20, 10:41:24 AM »
Male fertile carrot
Male sterile carrot


Male sterility in brassicas


« Last Edit: 2019-11-20, 10:44:14 AM by Joseph Lofthouse »

Steph S

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Re: Resources on breeding for illiterate farmers
« Reply #16 on: 2019-11-20, 10:57:56 AM »
Very cool!  8)  Have you seen CMS in onion, Joseph?
I had a couple of shallot plants with very reduced flowers in the population that flowered this season - as you mentioned, they look "fluffy" or different and stand out from the crowd.  The one in this pic actually did manage to produce a few viable flowers (less than ten seeds), but it's easy to see that most of the florets are missing vital parts.
I figured these two may be crossed with something - they also have leaves tending towards flat and very pale green, perhaps from a wild allium of some kind, leading to a mostly sterile hybrid.   

Ocimum

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Re: Resources on breeding for illiterate farmers
« Reply #17 on: 2019-11-20, 08:00:59 PM »
Thanks for the messages.

Steph: the example was about GMS not CMS. It was about Genetic Male Sterility (nuclear male sterility), usually inherited in a mendellian way, usually single gene, usually recessive. (isn't it great that in Nature, everything you are sure of is sometimes wrong?  ;D )

"Offspring tend to resemble their parents & grandparents, and some traits skip a generation."
I like the generation skipping, thanks.

Joseph: did you lose a lot of diversity by roguing out the CMS plants in your crops? Or was it ok, because you already had a few generations with restorer genes doing some exchange?


Steph S

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Re: Resources on breeding for illiterate farmers
« Reply #18 on: 2019-11-21, 04:11:26 AM »
"(isn't it great that in Nature, everything you are sure of is sometimes wrong?  ;D )"
Yes!!!   I totally get this.  :D

Joseph Lofthouse

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Re: Resources on breeding for illiterate farmers
« Reply #19 on: 2019-11-21, 11:37:25 PM »
I don't have any reason to believe that there were any 'restorer genes' in my carrots. Therefore, I think that I lost 70% of the genetic diversity when I eliminated the CMS. In other words, I think that I lost all of the genetics of all of the F1 hybrid carrots that I started out with.

Ocimum

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Re: Resources on breeding for illiterate farmers
« Reply #20 on: 2019-11-22, 07:08:41 AM »
The only reason to believe restorer genes were involves would be if you had to select against CMS for more than 1 generation.
From the pictures I saw, your carrots look great, even with just 30% of the original gene pool.

reed

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Re: Resources on breeding for illiterate farmers
« Reply #21 on: 2019-11-22, 07:50:15 AM »
A program of this sort would necessarily involve in person discussions and hands on demonstrations...

I actually have an example of how it was done. I remember one time more than 50 years ago crawling around in a wagon full of corn looking for ears that met a specific description given me by my grandad. He kept some I found and pitched others out, I don't know why.  I looked at those he kept and those he didn't but couldn't see the difference and he didn't expalin.

I remember for my part the ears had to be all white not even one offcolor kernel, they couldn't be sticking out the end of the shucks and couldn't have any missing kernels on the tip, they had to have red cobs. Comparitively longer, fatter ears were also favored but as I recall not exclusively. Those that passed my and his inspections we shelled off  by hand, not the sheller and put them in sacks that were taken to the house. I remember the dust and how it smelled.

I realze my recollections of this and the presumed goal of how to do it now, I'm assuming on a much larger scale are two entirely diffeent things. Just wanted to tell it.



Steph S

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Re: Resources on breeding for illiterate farmers
« Reply #22 on: 2019-11-22, 08:42:41 AM »
Awesome story, Reed.  :)

Joseph Lofthouse

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Re: Resources on breeding for illiterate farmers
« Reply #23 on: 2019-11-22, 03:53:15 PM »
I did several generations of culling. I think mostly because it's really hard to examine every plant when it's at a suitable culling age.