Author Topic: Diploid potato? Wild Tomato?  (Read 104 times)

Andrew Barney

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Diploid potato? Wild Tomato?
« on: 2019-11-02, 07:40:42 AM »
Found these interesting specimens at my local whole foods. Had to get them.

Do you think the tiny potatoes are diploid?

Do you think the tiny tomatoes have wild ancestry?

nathanp

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Re: Diploid potato? Wild Tomato?
« Reply #1 on: 2019-11-02, 06:15:01 PM »
The potatoes are probably just harvested early, so they stay smaller, or varieties that produce smaller potatoes.  I am not aware of any diploid commercial potatoes in the US.
[EDIT] - found the company website. 
https://www.tastefulselections.com/products/


The tomatoes appear to be this brand:

https://www.producemarketguide.com/article/sunsets-sprinkles-tomatoes-and-qukes-tiny-mighty
« Last Edit: 2019-11-02, 06:23:04 PM by nathanp »

Andrew Barney

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Re: Diploid potato? Wild Tomato?
« Reply #2 on: 2019-11-02, 10:36:42 PM »
The potatoes are probably just harvested early, so they stay smaller, or varieties that produce smaller potatoes.  I am not aware of any diploid commercial potatoes in the US.

You're probably right. But I guess my real question is if you are breeding for micro potatoes would there be any benefit to tetraploid at that point? Wouldn't diploid be competitive at that market?

nathanp

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Re: Diploid potato? Wild Tomato?
« Reply #3 on: 2019-11-02, 11:17:33 PM »
Not necessarily.  I've never had a diploid produce anything close to the yield of most tetraploids.  You can usually plant them closer together than tetraploids, and you usually need to otherwise the crowns won't cover the soil, because the plants are usually smaller but they also produce less.

Also, typically selecting varieties that produce more stems means a higher tuber count than a variety with fewer stems.  Total yield is still dictated by crown cover, but you'll get smaller potatoes.  You can do things to force potatoes to produce smaller potatoes, such as crowding the plants.  You will get a higher tuber count of smaller tubers.  Yield is related to number of tubers per stem, so the closer together they are, the smaller the tubers will usually be.

I've grown out several hundred diploid seedlings over the past several years, and have yet to find one that I am happy with.  Even the named diploid varieties from other breeders typically do not perform adequately for me.  Next year I have 3 candidate plants out of about 50 seedlings this year to evaluate when grown from tubers.  I suspect none of them will yield well.

The genetics are easier to manage and work with just because they are simpler, but they are not as easy to work with as tetraploids.


Doro

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Re: Diploid potato? Wild Tomato?
« Reply #4 on: 2019-11-07, 04:17:58 AM »
There are a lot of older tetraploid varieties that have a tendency to produce smaller tubers and a good harvest. I think the popularity of breeding for the large tuber varieties came with machine harvesting and processing. I grew some old tetraploid varieties from the Canary Islands this year and was really pleased with their over all harvest of golf ball sized tubers. A little work intense to get them out of the soil, but really neat for serving them whole.
Diploids have smaller harvests for me too, they do not like my long day conditions. They also have a much shorter storage life. Which makes them unattractive for my northern garden. I can see how they are interesting for warm climate areas where you could do two or three harvests, but for short summer areas they are not really worth growing. Even with excellent storage conditions the seed tubers in spring are looking quite bad. If a tetraploid seed tuber would look that bad in spring lol I'd compost it and not even try to plant it.
The only reason I'm playing around with diploids are their scab resistance (still hoping to breed them with a tetraploid one day), their good taste and the vibrant flower colours. But as of now they are more of an edible flower border oddity for me than a true food crop.