Author Topic: Ipomoea pandurata, aka man root, man of the earth, wild sweet potato  (Read 294 times)

Chance

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This video has some good tips for a veggie graft healing chamber: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9Mxy0HfgpKY

reed

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That's all very interesting. It had occurred to me to use glue but I was afraid of getting some of it between the graft which I figured wouldn't be good. The one video showed a little clip that looked like I might be able to make with a piece of drinking straw.

What I'm thinking now is I want to basically make a root to root graft with a chunk of batatas, perhaps containing one little bud on top of pandurata. I don't care if it grows much, just that the two heal together into one, maybe even letting it go mostly dormant over the winter. This might not be the best time of year to try such a thing but if it did work it would have all winter to become one plant and when new sprouts appeared on the batatas next spring the genetic transfer, if any should be maximized.

If the fused root is healthy enough next spring I might be able to remove any growing shoots and force new ones to sprout off the batatas. With the already known tendency of mutation in batatas who knows what might come from it. One paper I read speculated that the reason batatas does that is that unlike a potato tuber a sweet potato root does not have eyes. When it sprouts a slip it has to conjure it up from cells not generally used for that purpose in most plants. That particular paper was a little above my pay grade, when I come across it again I'll post a link.

Went out last evening and collected up some candidate batatas root and trunk sections. I figure it is important to try to match diameter as closely as possible so the respective types of tissue join each other correctly. I'll have to experiment on how to securely fasten them together. The glue method looks easy but still a little concerned about using it.

Not sure about needing the healing chamber, what I have in mind is so very different from normal vegetable plant grafts. I guess it's more like woody grafts like for fruit trees. Sweet potatoes like it hot though so if I put a plastic cover on I shouldn't need to worry too much about overheating.

 

 
« Last Edit: 2019-10-10, 04:29:22 AM by reed »

Chance

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Yea the glue technique seems most ideal with seedlings, but perhaps it can work ok in somewhat larger diameter plant stems too.  If you search grafting clips on eBay you can get them pretty cheap.   

Iíll be interested to see updates on your experiments in the future.  Iím sure youíre right that batatas has more innate plasticity potential, are therefore likely more susceptible to graft induced variation that pandurata.  That said cold hardiness is a complex characteristic so if it can be transferred might take generations of grafts.  In any case, Iím sure youíll try some pollinations with pandurata pollen on these batatas graftlings relatively early on.  It would be great if it could take the interspecific seed potential up from 2%.

You might be right about not needing the healing chamber, since youíre working with plants with more lignin than veggie seedlings.  Still even a crude humidity dome might be a good idea for a short period
« Last Edit: Today at 12:39:04 PM by Chance »

Chance

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Here is a second year root I just dug.  Easier to harvest than I suspected even in poor soil.  Dug it to 8 inches on one side then pulled it.