Author Topic: Vining Yellow Crookneck Squash  (Read 68 times)

Ryan M Miller

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Vining Yellow Crookneck Squash
« on: 2019-09-25, 04:41:04 PM »
Since almost all yellow Cucurbita pepo Summer squash has a compact bush growth habit, I have been trying to breed a vining cultivar of Yellow Crookneck squash. Although yellow crookneck squash has been bred with a compact growth pattern to save growing space, I have found ironically that this growth pattern actually uses up more space than a climing, vining growth pattern since I trellis my squash whenever I grow it. Additionally, the compact growth of yellow crookneck squash leaves the plants vulnerable to attacks from squash vine borers and makes the plants less suitable for companion planting in the three sisters method.

If anyone wants to se my progress so far this year with this breeding project, I have already started a thread documenting my efforts on permies.com
https://permies.com/t/118745/Vining-Yellow-Crookneck-squash

For the first part of this breeding project, I crossed a yellow crookneck squash with a vining non-bitter ornamental gourd. After a few false starts, I was finally able to make the cross pollination with the yellow crookneck as the male parent and the ornamental gourd as the female parent. Not long after the cross pollination, the yellow crookneck plant finally died from squash vine borer damage by the middle of August. Thankfully, I was still able to successfully recover over 200 viable F1 seeds from the cross pollinated fruit from the ornamental gourd by the end of the month.

The next part of this breeding project will be finding willing participants to pollinate a few F1 plants with other F1 plants and growing out as many of the F2 plants as possible to begin the selection for vining phenotype and large, yellow fruits. In my original research, I deternined that the gene controling compact growth habit in squash is determined by only one dominant gene so it should at least require two generations to restore vining growth habit into the phenotype of the plant.

For more information about the status of this project, you can visit the link to the original thread on the permies page.

Andrew Barney

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Re: Vining Yellow Crookneck Squash
« Reply #1 on: 2019-09-25, 05:45:08 PM »
Cool project! Sounds like a worthy goal. I have a project idea with crookedneck squash that I'd like to do, but its been on the back burner for awhile. One I'd like to breed a really warty white colored crooked neck squash. Just because. I find all the yellow ones unexciting. I've been planning on using a white acorn squash as the other parent line.

Another cool one would be to grab that trait from ornamental gourds that has half yellow-green. But I don't know much about that and/or if that is in a bitter gourd background or not. I think they might have yellow-green zucchini. EDIT: Zephyr.

Or other cool patterns like delicatta but in crookedneck.
« Last Edit: 2019-09-25, 06:06:26 PM by Andrew Barney »

Ryan M Miller

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Re: Vining Yellow Crookneck Squash
« Reply #2 on: 2019-09-25, 07:42:24 PM »
Another cool one would be to grab that trait from ornamental gourds that has half yellow-green. But I don't know much about that and/or if that is in a bitter gourd background or not. I think they might have yellow-green zucchini. EDIT: Zephyr.



In case you didn't get the chance to see my original post on the Permies forum, the female parent for the F1 seeds has bicolor skin. This may make it possible to breed a bicolored vining crookneck squash if I desired. This was not the original goal of my breeding project because there seem to be multiple genes affecting fruit shape as opposed to vine length, but any participant in the project is allowed to use the F1 cross to breed a bicolored squash if he pleases as long as he agrees not to patent the resulting variety.