Author Topic: Drought resistant Australian varieties  (Read 1893 times)

Steve1

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Re: Drought resistant Australian varieties
« Reply #30 on: 2019-12-13, 05:49:30 PM »
Thanks Raymondo!

Yes, we have a lot of heat and drought resistant SW US and Mexican varieties. Even a lot of dent corn bred by eastern farmers in the 19th and early 20th centuries. Plenty of rain usually but often late July and August get very hot and dry.

I found that a wild Mexican tomato, Matt's Wild Cherry, is heat and drought resistant. It's a 5/8 inch red tomato. I wonder if it's related to or the same as Matt's Folly?


Yep, Mattís Folly is a Tom Wagner tomato, a cross between Mattís Wild and Cassidyís Folly. Easy to follow his naming as itís often based on pedigree.

S.Simonsen

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Re: Drought resistant Australian varieties
« Reply #31 on: 2020-05-30, 07:10:01 PM »
I grow in subtropical Australia as well and the drought last spring was pretty epic. I grow without any irrigation on my degraded clay soil and it is very doable. I sow most seed direct during our fairly reliable late summer/autumn wet spell then rely on most crops persisting after that. We were harvesting vegetables for the household up until the last month of the 7 month drought, and I managed to start most of my warm season annuals during the dry spring without irrigation (though they didnt really take off until the late summer rains came). It is quite amazing watching seed germinate in dust dry soil.

Our problem here isnt just hot/dry like most desert growers experience, but the sudden shift from hot/dry to hot/wet as the monsoon finally arrives. Lots of drought tolerant plants rot when that change hits, but there are still plenty of options. The desert Solanums for example would never grow this close to the coast for this reason. Sorghum grows well here but we have epic bird populations, including flocks of thousands of parrots that scour the continent for grain, so it gets destroyed without protection (which prevents you growing it on any useful scale). I have developed a parrot resistant white maize strain though but it can still be tricky to grow when the rain doesnt arrive at the right time to get it going, or continues too late so they rot at harvest. I am hopeful I can find a more equatorial strain of quinoa from colombia or northern peru that matches our daylength since the saponins on the seeds should be enough to protect the crop.

Troppo

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Re: Drought resistant Australian varieties
« Reply #32 on: 2020-05-30, 08:36:53 PM »
I grow in subtropical Australia as well and the drought last spring was pretty epic. I grow without any irrigation on my degraded clay soil and it is very doable. I sow most seed direct during our fairly reliable late summer/autumn wet spell then rely on most crops persisting after that. We were harvesting vegetables for the household up until the last month of the 7 month drought, and I managed to start most of my warm season annuals during the dry spring without irrigation (though they didnt really take off until the late summer rains came). It is quite amazing watching seed germinate in dust dry soil.

Our problem here isnt just hot/dry like most desert growers experience, but the sudden shift from hot/dry to hot/wet as the monsoon finally arrives. Lots of drought tolerant plants rot when that change hits, but there are still plenty of options. The desert Solanums for example would never grow this close to the coast for this reason. Sorghum grows well here but we have epic bird populations, including flocks of thousands of parrots that scour the continent for grain, so it gets destroyed without protection (which prevents you growing it on any useful scale). I have developed a parrot resistant white maize strain though but it can still be tricky to grow when the rain doesnt arrive at the right time to get it going, or continues too late so they rot at harvest. I am hopeful I can find a more equatorial strain of quinoa from colombia or northern peru that matches our daylength since the saponins on the seeds should be enough to protect the crop.

Iím interested to hear more about your bird resistant corn variety, Iím currently developing a flinty landrace but suffer really bad bird pressure. Iím also developing a sorghum landrace as well, bird pressure is not to bad due to the large amount of sorghum grown in this area they seem to leave my small crop alone. Iím currently gardening sub tropical also (Toowoomba area).