Author Topic: Drought resistant Australian varieties  (Read 874 times)

Walt

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Re: Drought resistant Australian varieties
« Reply #15 on: 2019-09-22, 01:29:51 PM »
I was a tomato breeder in the Sahel (just south of the Sahara) for 3 years.  I found that the wild tomato LA 0722 from the Tomato Genetics Cooperative was extremely heat and drought tolerant, as were their F1 and F2 seedlings from crosses of various domestic tomatoes.
LA 0722 is S pimpinelifolium with pea-sized fruit.  The domestic tomatoes I used included Super Marmand and other medium sized tomatoes.  F1 was ping Pong ball size.  F2 averaged about the same size, with some variation, of course.
LA 0722 had OK flavor during the very warm rainy season, but fruits ripening in cooler dry season were somewhat bitter.  F1 and F2 didn't show the bitterness, as I remember (35 years ago).
Go to the Tomato Genetics Cooperative website and there is a list of heat and drought tolerant accessions.  LA 0722 is not on the list, so I assume they have even better accessions.
I think you might have to pay for a phytosanitary certificate to import such seeds, but check.  I think it would be worth your time.
My experiments with LA 0722 were done on dune soil.  They survived for 6 weeks after the last rain of the season.  And they didn't die of heat or drought.  They were killed by a herd of cattle walking accross them.  They had been in good condition the day before.

Nicholas Locke

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Re: Drought resistant Australian varieties
« Reply #16 on: 2019-10-15, 04:39:29 AM »
I live in Queensland Australia, and can tell you its been extremely hot and dry, We reached 38c in the first week of spring. thankfully we have just had 38mm this last week it settled the dust and cooled of a little, but the rivers and creeks are still dry. I market garden here and found most off the shelf varieties fail. So i started saving seed, and breeding my own varities. If you are "prepping" I would mostly concentrate on staple crops of starches and protiens,  greens could be come by from edible weeds. wild lettuces, mallow, purslane, plantain, etc.. I think Mexican people call them "Quelite's"
I have a book by Gary Nabhan called "Growing food in a hotter drier land" which has some great concepts.
We have here in Australia a grains Gene bank which has also field crops like dry beans , tepery beans,  etc. When looking for accesions I mostly look for ones which come from places like the south west usa or hot places in africa or iran etc.
I am slowly building up a collection of varieties and breeding new ones that are adapted to our extreme climate here as I think this is becoming the "normal" my ambition is to start a seed company which sells this collection, as alot of our seeds from local seed companies are imported and sh*t their pants when they germinate here!
"Maybe" said the farmer...

Lauren

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Re: Drought resistant Australian varieties
« Reply #17 on: 2019-10-15, 10:18:28 AM »
I am slowly building up a collection of varieties and breeding new ones that are adapted to our extreme climate here as I think this is becoming the "normal" my ambition is to start a seed company which sells this collection, as alot of our seeds from local seed companies are imported and sh*t their pants when they germinate here!
At least they'll be well fertilized. :) Your third generation is going to be the most important. It often takes years for me to get just one plant that can take off in my conditions. I refuse to coddle them, but if I can get one generation they do better the 2nd, and by the 3rd they're trying to take over the world. :)

Imagine what your plants can do in a normal garden, after being bred for super arid.

Nicholas Locke

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Re: Drought resistant Australian varieties
« Reply #18 on: 2019-10-15, 11:12:30 PM »

Imagine what your plants can do in a normal garden, after being bred for super arid.

I use to think that would be the case, but I now think with every "desirable" condition there comes a "non desirable" condition, good and bad are one and the same. They wont have had exposure to diseases and parasites that are associated with a more humid enviroment etc.. things need exposure to develop resistance. things might thrive in a certain environment but fail in another. But i would imagine there would be enough genetic diversity in my varieties that some would do ok or even thrive.   
"Maybe" said the farmer...

Walt

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Re: Drought resistant Australian varieties
« Reply #19 on: 2019-10-16, 10:44:22 AM »
CIMMYT had a breeding population of barley that they grew in cool highland and hot humid lowland in alternate generations.  The resulting population has been useful around the world.  But growing a population in one place for many generations will generally give less widely adpted populations, as Nicholas said.

Nicholas Locke

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Re: Drought resistant Australian varieties
« Reply #20 on: 2019-10-17, 01:42:27 PM »
"Return to resistance" by Raoul Robinson is a great book explaining this and other great info from a very well seasoned breeder. Its a free downlaod to.
"Maybe" said the farmer...

Woody Gardener

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Re: Drought resistant Australian varieties
« Reply #21 on: 2019-10-18, 04:25:54 PM »
"Return to resistance" by Raoul Robinson is a great book explaining this and other great info from a very well seasoned breeder. Its a free downlaod to.

The pdf download is here:
http://www.sharebooks.com/system/files/Return-to-Resistance.pdf

Lauren

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Re: Drought resistant Australian varieties
« Reply #22 on: 2019-10-23, 08:08:20 AM »
Thanks. I'm about halfway through that book and it's very good. Obviously biased toward his own processes, but most of what I've read so far makes sense. I thought parts of it negatively amusing--he's very open about what happens when scientists buck the system.

Diane Whitehead

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Re: Drought resistant Australian varieties
« Reply #23 on: 2019-11-13, 07:51:53 PM »
A native Australian tomato, described in Dark Emu by Bruce Pascoe, sounds good.

"The desert raisin or bush tomato (Solanum centrale), used by Central Desert people for thousands of years ....Custodians celebrate the plant in ceremonies, dance and song, and body painting often features its image. Surplus harvests were ground to a paste and rolled into balls, which could be used more than a year later."

Are any of you growing it?
Victoria, British Columbia, Canada
cool mediterranean climate  warm dry summers, mild wet winters,  70 cm rain,   sandy soil

Woody Gardener

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Re: Drought resistant Australian varieties
« Reply #24 on: 2019-11-14, 06:03:57 AM »
A native Australian tomato, described in Dark Emu by Bruce Pascoe, sounds good.

"The desert raisin or bush tomato (Solanum centrale), used by Central Desert people for thousands of years ....Custodians celebrate the plant in ceremonies, dance and song, and body painting often features its image. Surplus harvests were ground to a paste and rolled into balls, which could be used more than a year later."

Are any of you growing it?

Wow! Thanks.
A Google search turned up information and seeds. I passed that along to our Australian members. I might give it a try in my Ozark highlands garden.

gmuller

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Re: Drought resistant Australian varieties
« Reply #25 on: 2019-11-23, 07:19:25 PM »
A lot of the inland solanums are poisonous unless picked at the right time. In the south east, we have S.laciniatum, and S.aviculare, both edible when fully ripe, but really tomato like. Both are perennial. I have thought of grafting onto them, but my old seed i sowed this spring didn't germinate. need to collect some more.
Carol Deppe points out that frost adapted plants are often hot resistant as well. might be worth looking to Tassie.

Walt

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Re: Drought resistant Australian varieties
« Reply #26 on: 2019-11-24, 12:44:30 PM »
Ms. Deppe is quite right.  The Land Institute's work toward perennial wheat bogged down until it was realized that summer hardiness (tolerance of heat and drought) was the more serious problem than regrowth and cold tolerance.

Steve1

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Re: Drought resistant Australian varieties
« Reply #27 on: 2019-11-25, 04:42:28 AM »
A lot of the inland solanums are poisonous unless picked at the right time. In the south east, we have S.laciniatum, and S.aviculare, both edible when fully ripe, but really tomato like. Both are perennial. I have thought of grafting onto them, but my old seed i sowed this spring didn't germinate. need to collect some more.
Carol Deppe points out that frost adapted plants are often hot resistant as well. might be worth looking to Tassie.

Hmm, the toxic compound in those two species is the alkaloid solasodine found in all green parts of the plant (green berries, leaves and stems). I did read that at an unspecified level it could cause liver and heart damage and fetal abortion. It's the same glycoalkaloid in eggplants however. I never grafted it because I wondered whether extra solasodine might be translocated to the grafted eggplants. Just thoughts, no hard facts - just made me nervous enough to back away.

gmuller

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Re: Drought resistant Australian varieties
« Reply #28 on: 2019-11-26, 01:58:13 AM »
hi steve, finally got a bit of spare time, will have a look through your comments. would be good to catch up again soon. might be interested in some sweet potatoes too. ;)

PaulJ

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Re: Drought resistant Australian varieties
« Reply #29 on: Today at 09:49:23 AM »
Sorghum is from Africa and is a reliable crop there
can be used as a grain like rice the stems make syrup

you may also want to look into quinoa and amaranth although they may need more water

millet too..
« Last Edit: Today at 09:53:24 AM by PaulJ »