Author Topic: Drought resistant Australian varieties  (Read 1149 times)

Walt

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Re: Drought resistant Australian varieties
« Reply #30 on: 2019-12-10, 10:06:47 AM »
Some sorghum grains are somewhat like rice.  But sorghum, being rather closely related to corn, can have sweet, floury, dent, flint, pop, and waxy.
When my family lived in Rep. du Niger, my wife used a cornbread recipe using Sorghum flour.  She found it needed a bit if sweetening to overcome the slight bitterness that came from the tannin in the periocarp.  She also used sorghum flour for tortias.
Sorghum is more drought tolerant, more flood tolerant, and more heat tolerant than corn.  But where conditions are better, corn is preferred.  The saying where we lived was, "If you can grow corn, you grow corn.  If you can't grow corn, grow sorghum.  If you can't grow sorghum, grow pearl millet.  If you can't grow pearl millet, don't farm there."
That reminds me.  Pearl millet is the most heat and drought tolerant grain I'm aware of.  It is also my least favorite grain that I've eaten.  It's not bad.  Just not as good as others.

Steve1

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Re: Drought resistant Australian varieties
« Reply #31 on: 2019-12-13, 05:49:30 PM »
Thanks Raymondo!

Yes, we have a lot of heat and drought resistant SW US and Mexican varieties. Even a lot of dent corn bred by eastern farmers in the 19th and early 20th centuries. Plenty of rain usually but often late July and August get very hot and dry.

I found that a wild Mexican tomato, Matt's Wild Cherry, is heat and drought resistant. It's a 5/8 inch red tomato. I wonder if it's related to or the same as Matt's Folly?


Yep, Mattís Folly is a Tom Wagner tomato, a cross between Mattís Wild and Cassidyís Folly. Easy to follow his naming as itís often based on pedigree.