Author Topic: Tepary Beans  (Read 755 times)

Lauren

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Tepary Beans
« on: 2019-08-26, 09:02:09 PM »
2nd year appears to be a total flop. Last year it was skinny, weak plants that died with the first frost. Not a single bloom or seed. This year it's big, lush plants...that will probably die with the first frost. Not a single bloom or seed visible. I have no idea what I'm doing wrong.

The soil is primarily sand. Last year I planted two batches, one in an area with regular water and one without. Same thing happened to both groups. This year they're in my dry garden and haven't been watered at all. Same thing is happening.

If I can get that first generation I'll be OK, but why are there no blooms? Two years in a row, in different soil, different water, different sun...Well technically the same sun, but some in partial shade, some in full sun. I planted last year in early spring (May) and this year in June. No difference. I even have one batch that's in a pot, in mixed potting soil. No blooms.

Does anyone have any suggestions?

B. Copping

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Re: Tepary Beans
« Reply #1 on: 2019-08-26, 09:37:27 PM »
Is it possible that the variety you are trying to grow is sensitive to day-length?

Iím trying a beige seeded Dolchios lablab out of a sprouting mix, but so far, no flowers for me.
In this case Iím going to assume that these beans are not ďday-length neutralĒ.

Ferdzy

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Re: Tepary Beans
« Reply #2 on: 2019-08-27, 06:25:10 AM »
I have certainly found beans in general to be more day-length sensitive than is widely known. I got some fagiolini del Trasimeno which I am growing only a little further north than they have been for the last 4000 years, and I am barely hanging on to them. They were a landrace with 13 to 17 different colours in it, depending on whom you ask. I am down to 3 or 4 - most of them just couldn't adapt to even a slight change in latitude.

As a digression, Jared Diamond talks about this phenomenon in "Guns Germs and Steel", how every crop in the Americas crept north at a very, very slow pace because of this need to adapt to different amounts/intensities of daylight, whereas agricultural developments sloshed back and forth across Eurasia very quickly because they didn't usually need to make that adaptation.

Lauren

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Re: Tepary Beans
« Reply #3 on: 2019-08-27, 07:13:10 AM »
I hadn't thought about day length. Some were from Joseph and some purchased seeds, although I'm not sure which came up.

B. Copping

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Re: Tepary Beans
« Reply #4 on: 2019-08-27, 12:27:51 PM »
Since you have some in a pot, you might try giving those some protection as the season gets colder.
Perhaps bring them indoors?

Much depends on how badly you need to produce seed of this variety.
Do you want to cross these with another variety?

Lauren

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Re: Tepary Beans
« Reply #5 on: 2019-08-27, 05:08:35 PM »
I just want seeds. The first generation with any new plant is problematic. 2nd generation will do better. But getting that first generation is often a years-long struggle of wasted seeds. So far two years down. If I can get just a few seeds, I'm OK. If I run out of seeds before I get that second generation, tepary beans are off the list.

The beans in the pot are against a brick wall so they should be getting more heat, and protected from overhead.

Steve1

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Re: Tepary Beans
« Reply #6 on: 2019-08-27, 10:06:26 PM »
Hi Lauren,
I grew some last year in a heated glasshouse. They sat there for four or five months over winter (short days) before I stuck a light over them. 10 hrs wasn't enough. Where are you and what is your day length?
(Edit) Have just noticed your in Utah. Should be long enough days.
Sometimes too much N can give excess leaf growth - could that be part of it? I don't have any other thoughts...

Cheers
Steve

« Last Edit: 2019-08-27, 10:21:25 PM by Steve1 »

Lauren

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Re: Tepary Beans
« Reply #7 on: 2019-08-28, 09:26:15 AM »
Nitrogen is possible, I suppose, but unlikely. This area was sand two years ago, grass two years before that. Now it's my dry garden. No fertilizer, and no water (from me) since May. The plants are doing great. Just not blooming.

B. Copping

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Re: Tepary Beans
« Reply #8 on: 2019-08-28, 09:37:40 AM »
Perhaps start some in pots at the same time that you start your eggplants/tomatoes?

If they are daylength sensitive, you might get the plants mature enough that they flower in the spring/early summer and are able to mature some seeds.

(Just tossing out ideas)

Lauren

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Re: Tepary Beans
« Reply #9 on: 2019-08-28, 09:54:11 AM »
It's a thought. I planted in May just like I do with everything else, but they didn't really start growing until early July.

ImGrimmer

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Re: Tepary Beans
« Reply #10 on: 2019-08-31, 03:27:48 AM »
I planted several seeds this year. They struggle with the drought. Never seen such tiny plants but some bloom and set seeds.
I don`t think they are daylength sensitive.

Lauren

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Re: Tepary Beans
« Reply #11 on: 2019-08-31, 10:03:32 AM »
Where did you get your seeds? Last year's plants were incredibly tiny, but now I think they were getting too MUCH water. The plants that haven't been watered at all this year are doing better.

ImGrimmer

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Re: Tepary Beans
« Reply #12 on: 2019-08-31, 10:10:38 AM »
I got them from Serbia in southern Europe. Very erratic germination like mostly all plants this year.

Lauren

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Re: Tepary Beans
« Reply #13 on: 2019-09-18, 12:00:21 PM »
I saw my first blossoms last week, and now I can see the first bean forming. Regardless of parentage they all seem to be blooming at the same time, so it's likely something environmental.

Joseph Lofthouse

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Re: Tepary Beans
« Reply #14 on: 2019-09-21, 10:59:43 PM »
I don't notice issues with day-length sensitivity in my tepary beans. Any with that issue would have self-culled in the first generation. My current seed lot of teparies have a lot of segregating hybrids. They've been fun to grow. They are already dried down, except that it rained on them the past two days.