Author Topic: Twin bean pods  (Read 264 times)

triffid

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Twin bean pods
« on: 2019-07-10, 01:51:54 PM »
I've spotted a couple of strange pods on a dwarf French bean. There appears to be two pods, conjoined at the top, emerging from the same flower. What's happening here?

Pics to follow tomorrow.

triffid

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Re: Twin bean pods
« Reply #1 on: 2019-07-13, 05:43:37 PM »
Here they are. As you can see in multiple instances it looks as if two pods are developing from one ovary. It's only occurring on this single plant.

These are a suspected cross between Beefy Resilient Grex and Jersey Dwarf. https://www.brownenvelopeseeds.com/product-p/jersey-grex.htm

Apologies for the bizarre purplish tinge to the photos.

B. Copping

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Re: Twin bean pods
« Reply #2 on: 2019-07-15, 12:07:47 PM »
Im afraid I dont have anything intelligent to contribute, but I do want to thank you for posting this.

(I like the weirdo (plants) that show up in the garden)

galina

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Re: Twin bean pods
« Reply #3 on: 2019-07-18, 04:53:47 PM »
There is a similar thing I occasionally observe in squash.  Some plants do produce conjoint twins but most plants do not.  A plant that produces one is quite likely to produce more in later courgettes. 

But I have never seen it in legumes, neither in beans nor peas. 

Thanks for showing us. 
Central England, cool, maritime (ish), cloudy, often dry, but recent weather unpredictable

triffid

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Re: Twin bean pods
« Reply #4 on: 2019-08-13, 09:55:36 AM »
I've since learned that this phenomenon is fasciation of the fruit. No idea what caused the fasciation in this instance.
Unfortunately, the bean pods failed to develop and dropped off the plant.

Rebsie Fairholm

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Re: Twin bean pods
« Reply #5 on: 2019-08-14, 03:10:37 AM »
That is a curious thing. What a shame it dropped off!

I haven't seen anything like that in beans (or peas). It's funny, we never bat an eyelid when tomatoes do bizarre things (I have a greenhouse full of conjoined twins, lewd appendages, flower petals growing out of fruit stalks etc) but in things with pods that sort of stuff doesn't usually happen.

I don't have an explanation, but I have had spontaneous fasciation in peas caused by a period of erratic weather as if the weather in the UK isn't always erratic.

Also this year I had a doubled/conjoined flower (or two flowers rather, joined back to back) in one of my peas. In this instance it was an umbellatum type pea, so the fasciation was genetic, just a little bit messed up. It briefly set two pods before dropping off, but didn't get anywhere near as advanced as yours.
Daughter of the Soil : suburban garden, south-west England