Author Topic: monocot, dicot, tricot ?  (Read 241 times)

spacecase0

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monocot, dicot, tricot ?
« on: 2019-07-10, 12:52:35 AM »
so, my biology books separate things out by monocot and dicot plants
but the internet tells me that tricot seems to be a fabric ?
I only ask this because I have a zucchini plant that had 3 leaves when it sprouted (I intentionally selected for this)
now that it happened, I can't find any reference to any plant doing that in my books or the internet.
seems like I am just not finding what I am looking for in my research.
any ideas what is going on ?

Doro

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Re: monocot, dicot, tricot ?
« Reply #1 on: 2019-07-10, 10:26:56 AM »
Tricot is the fabric which is kind of a zigzag weave on one side and smooth on the other side. It is kind of a knitted weave.
Google told me that Tricot is a rock band from Japan though ;D user customized search results are the curse of modern internet hahaha one just gets to see what Google thinks you are looking for. I should switch that off again lol Japanese rockband tz.
Tricot as an abbreviation might be used for plants too, I don't know. The search term 'three cotyledon' gave me some good results.

(And now I'll have to check out that rock band ;) )

bill

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Re: monocot, dicot, tricot ?
« Reply #2 on: 2019-07-10, 08:33:49 PM »
It is still a dicot, taxonomically speaking.  It is just an uncommon variant.  Seedlings with three or even four cotyledons are fairly common in some species.

spacecase0

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Re: monocot, dicot, tricot ?
« Reply #3 on: 2019-07-12, 05:33:11 PM »
thank you for the information.
I can find results now

the one I have seems to be growing faster
for years I had selected for sort of a triangular shape, where it is thicker on one side than the other.
I figured that the larger seed size would grow faster at first. (I have an issue of insects and slugs eating slow growing plants when they first germinate)
and it seems to have worked, it was the fastest growing plant when small.

Walt

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Re: monocot, dicot, tricot ?
« Reply #4 on: 2019-07-13, 10:02:27 AM »
Traditionally taxonomists have seperated angiosperm plants into monocots and dicots.  In the last 30 years DNA has shown that the dicot group has more ancient divisions than the monocot-dicot division.  Check Wikipedia for more infoemation if it matters to you.
Several plant breeders have selected for tricots,  in some species selection was effective, in other species it wasn't/  My work with okra failed to increase tricot percentage in 3 generations.  Not that anyone cared.  Not even me.