Author Topic: Breeding with wild tomato species  (Read 3244 times)

William S.

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Re: Breeding with wild tomato species
« Reply #60 on: 2020-03-25, 12:16:56 PM »
Penellii and Purish Penellii are doing fine so far.
Western Montana garden, glacial lake Missoula sediment lacustrian silty clay mollisoil sometimes with added sand in places. Zone 6A with 100 to 130 frost free days

William S.

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Re: Breeding with wild tomato species
« Reply #61 on: 2020-03-27, 11:52:41 AM »
A Starling just crept into my basement, presumably through a plastic packed opening where the sump pump hose goes out. It severely damaged a large number of my tomato seedlings including those for this project. I think the pure penellii  may have sustained the most damage thinning heavily, and leaving only a couple seedlings.

Starling Thinning Included:
Pure Penellii
Purish Penellii
BH-3 Species
S. Hab pollinated by bh x w
Dwarf hirsutum
Peruvianum (down to one)
Wild Child (may need replanted)
BH x W - XL (not bad damage, maybe lost one)
Best Flavor 2019 (not terrible, but compounded with slow to poor germination)
Probably other more abundant trays like my homegrown BH x W seed and the domestics were thinned as well.

Starling! Anyhow it flew up the stairs and we shooed it out the front door. I repacked the sump pump drain exit.
Western Montana garden, glacial lake Missoula sediment lacustrian silty clay mollisoil sometimes with added sand in places. Zone 6A with 100 to 130 frost free days

William S.

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Re: Breeding with wild tomato species
« Reply #62 on: 2020-03-27, 10:14:56 PM »
Wondering: what if: direct plant seeds of exserteds most likely to have been pollinated by promiscuous in 2019 next to promiscuous. Gene flow only goes one way. Eventually promiscuous should overtake exserteds and become population dominant if repeated year after year. 
Western Montana garden, glacial lake Missoula sediment lacustrian silty clay mollisoil sometimes with added sand in places. Zone 6A with 100 to 130 frost free days

William S.

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Re: Breeding with wild tomato species
« Reply #63 on: 2020-05-15, 07:21:06 PM »
Put out the Big Hill x W? Xl and the Big Hill x W? Best tasting of 2019 in the fenced garden today in rows I rototilled last night between rain storms. Today is the average date of last frost here.
Western Montana garden, glacial lake Missoula sediment lacustrian silty clay mollisoil sometimes with added sand in places. Zone 6A with 100 to 130 frost free days

William S.

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Re: Breeding with wild tomato species
« Reply #64 on: 2020-05-26, 08:57:06 PM »
Have at least 45 new germinates of the BH x W? G3 coming up from a winter generation of Joseph's elites With the forty G2 from Josephs elites that should lead to a lot of elites in my garden. So am expecting to do lots of taste testing! Also probably some weeding out. With the older planting being ~2 months old already I expect some will be ripe in time that I can do some weeding out before the currently sprouting seedlings produce fruit.

I figure at this point for this population it's just a question of population size and generations before we have a stable tasty obligately out breeding tomato or six.

Oh also I planted every seed produced by the thirteen G1 BH x W4 plants in my 2019 garden. In a separate patch. With parents all hard green wild types I expect a lot of the same. However at 75% domestic they should produce some elites. I should weed out the hard green ones perhaps there too.
« Last Edit: 2020-05-26, 09:07:36 PM by William S. »
Western Montana garden, glacial lake Missoula sediment lacustrian silty clay mollisoil sometimes with added sand in places. Zone 6A with 100 to 130 frost free days