Author Topic: Peas 2019  (Read 1374 times)

galina

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Re: Peas 2019
« Reply #45 on: 2019-07-06, 01:59:07 AM »
Yes this is exactly what I get with pink flowering peas here. 
Central England, cool, maritime (ish), cloudy, often dry, but recent weather unpredictable

galina

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Re: Peas 2019
« Reply #46 on: 2019-07-06, 02:14:06 AM »
I am happy with the snap peas this year.  A lot of rain followed by a few hot days and they have reached large sizes and very good sweetness.  A selection here. 

On the left front a cross between Sugar Magnolia and Charlie's Gold Snap, then Magnolia Blossom and on the right Charlie's Gold Snap (Amish Snap x Court Estate Gold).  A few others both mangetout aka snow peas and shellers too in the background. 

We have been eating them fresh for a while now, but these have gone into the freezer.  I find that snaps freeze beautifully. 


 
Central England, cool, maritime (ish), cloudy, often dry, but recent weather unpredictable

B. Copping

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Re: Peas 2019
« Reply #47 on: 2019-07-15, 12:18:32 PM »
Yes this is exactly what I get with pink flowering peas here.

Thanks!
(First time growing pink flowered peas)

Pink Flowered plant from the “Umbellatum Mix” sent to me by Andrew Barney.
Some of the seed in this mix were showing the Marmoreus trait (brown marbled testa), so they were the ones that got planted this year.
« Last Edit: 2019-07-15, 12:20:05 PM by B. Copping »

B. Copping

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Re: Peas 2019
« Reply #48 on: 2019-07-19, 08:55:35 PM »
It seems that the rogue in the ‘Purple Podded’, that had the pink blushed flowers, is a case of a seed of a different variety that has gotten mixed in.

Pod type is not the same as the other plants.
I have picked this pod, and am going to plant four of the eight seeds, and let the other four dry down.

(Picture quality is not good, sorry.)

galina

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Re: Peas 2019
« Reply #49 on: 2019-08-03, 02:34:48 AM »
A friend has a Rainbow Pea project ongoing and she tries to get tall shelling peas with interesting flower colours.  One of her crosses involved getting a dark purple flowered short pea from the genebank with the ar gene. 

She gave me a few seeds of the short ar variety and I managed to cross them to a tall marrowfat shelling pea (with white flowers and green pods) called Jeyes.  I have just shelled out the F2 seeds from this year's F1 plant and they are really surprising.

Multiple colours in some pods.  Brownish seeds both large and small.  The original ar variety has small olive green seeds.  I now have some olive seeds in a larger size than the ar variety.  And one solid purple seed. 

Predictably none are coloured like the original marrowfat sheller, but we have the size.  I will be fascinated to see if, or how, the seed colours correlate with features in the F2 generation. 


Central England, cool, maritime (ish), cloudy, often dry, but recent weather unpredictable

galina

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Re: Peas 2019
« Reply #50 on: 2019-08-03, 02:44:43 AM »
It seems that the rogue in the ‘Purple Podded’, that had the pink blushed flowers, is a case of a seed of a different variety that has gotten mixed in.

Pod type is not the same as the other plants.
I have picked this pod, and am going to plant four of the eight seeds, and let the other four dry down.

(Picture quality is not good, sorry.)

Perfectly good enough to see the difference.  Yes it looks like that there has been some seed mixing.  Has the pink seed produced edible pods?

If it is a chance cross then you should see from the 4 seeds you have sown.  But maybe you have another pretty variety as a bonus.  How are the 4 seeds going now? 
Central England, cool, maritime (ish), cloudy, often dry, but recent weather unpredictable

Andrew Barney

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Re: Peas 2019
« Reply #51 on: 2019-08-03, 07:53:32 AM »
That's pretty cool.  I need to finish collecting dry seeds, but I got a small seed increase for all the ones I planted.

I now have these colors available:

Purple snow pod with good flavor.
Red snap-ish pod (though flavor seems poor)
Purple seeds
Orange podded.
Various yellow podded, though not selected unfortunately.
Brick red seeds (biskopens)
Biskopens hybrids with light red seeds but produce earlier. Some with gumbel umbel trait and maybe purple pods.

And now black seeded. This one is way cool!

If anyone Is interested in this material let me know.
-Andrew

I always thought it would be neat to have a yellow podded with brick red seeds, or a red podded with red seeds to match. Or purple podded with purple seeds. But alas I still don't have those combinations. I haven't had the time. And sadly i found out my purple passion hybrids were actually just a fluke sugar magnolia cross and the purple seeds were not stable like purple passion, so that cross will need to be made again.
« Last Edit: 2019-08-04, 07:58:04 AM by Andrew Barney »

galina

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Re: Peas 2019
« Reply #52 on: 2019-08-04, 01:54:45 AM »
Forgive my ignorance,  what is the gumbel trait?

Black seeds, cool.  What variety is that please?
Central England, cool, maritime (ish), cloudy, often dry, but recent weather unpredictable

Andrew Barney

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Re: Peas 2019
« Reply #53 on: 2019-08-04, 07:59:21 AM »
Forgive my ignorance,  what is the gumbel trait?

Black seeds, cool.  What variety is that please?

Typo. I meant umbel. As In umbellatum or crown.

It has no name. I had to pay to extract it from the German seed bank. It is cool!

galina

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Re: Peas 2019
« Reply #54 on: 2019-08-05, 03:54:33 AM »
I understand Andrew.   Crown peas. 

I wonder whether the black seeded one is the same species as our normal peas.  Interesting.  What are the pods like?

Yes there are some attractive breeding options around.  There has been so much work on "English Peas"  ie marrowfat shelling peas that flower white in the past.  But now all the 'colourful' breeding seems to be by amateurs, even though it may be wrong to include A Kapuler in that category. 

I spend most of my time with edible podded peas, especially the larger ones that in the kitchen take the place of early beans due to their size.  And I like colours for their health benefits.  Guess there might be quite a bit of anthocyanin in black seeds.  But it might also mean off flavours.   Have you tasted them yet?

 
Central England, cool, maritime (ish), cloudy, often dry, but recent weather unpredictable

Andrew Barney

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Re: Peas 2019
« Reply #55 on: 2019-08-05, 05:51:36 AM »
I think these black seeded ones ARE the same species as domesticated English peas. The seeds are large and the pods are green (though maybe purple), can't remember completley,  though I might have some pictures.

I sent some other small pea relatives to Dianne or Brenda and they were tiny and different species. Way different.

I didn't taste them,  but you are correct,  they could have odd flavors either from the colors themselves or just from being inedible soup peas with weird flavor genes. Might need some work.


Diane Whitehead

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Re: Peas 2019
« Reply #56 on: 2019-08-05, 09:02:48 AM »
Andrew, do you have two kinds of black seeded peas?

The "rare black-seeded" ones you sent me must have had green pods as I made no note about them. I did not eat any or open the pods until they had dried.  The dried seeds are not as large as common peas - about the same size as "orc gene" and "purple-pod parsley" seeds.

Victoria, British Columbia, Canada
cool mediterranean climate  warm dry summers, mild wet winters,  70 cm rain,   sandy soil

B. Copping

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Re: Peas 2019
« Reply #57 on: 2019-08-05, 07:32:56 PM »
Seed harvest has begun.
(Not as fantastic as Galina’s crosses, though)

B. Copping

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Re: Peas 2019
« Reply #58 on: 2019-08-05, 07:42:32 PM »
Perfectly good enough to see the difference.  Yes it looks like that there has been some seed mixing.  Has the pink seed produced edible pods?

If it is a chance cross then you should see from the 4 seeds you have sown.  But maybe you have another pretty variety as a bonus.  How are the 4 seeds going now?

I haven’t had a taste test yet.
Seed collection first. :)

The four “seeds” (*cough* plants) finally went in the ground today.
The rest of the seeds & pods are what the rogue plant produced.
It was the first plant in that patch to senescence.

So, a bit of “plant torture”, due to last week being very messed up for me.
If I am able to provide enough shade, I should be able to see the flower colours, and possibly get a taste test before the end of the gardening season.
The dry pods are like the edible podded varieties that I have. (Crumbly)

Edit: Aug. 31
Three of the four plants have survived, and one has begun blooming.
Another pink blushed flower. (Happy)
« Last Edit: 2019-09-02, 12:36:19 PM by B. Copping »

B. Copping

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Re: Peas 2019
« Reply #59 on: 2019-08-08, 04:45:35 PM »
Andrew Barney was kind enough to send me seeds of his ‘Dwarf Gray Sugar’ to compare with mine.
After chance, mishaps and groundhogs wreaking havoc on my small plantings, I still had enough plants to get a comparison. :)

Results:
Andrew’s line of this variety are taller than mine, and have rounder seeds.


Flowered at node # (pods/plant double/single) height in inches

DGS:AB
15 (4s) 48”, branched@12 18/17 (6s) 50”, 16 (5d) 51”, 13 (2s), 14 (4s), 13 (3s), 11 (2s), (9d), (3s)
Three best tallest plants: 15 (4s) 48”, b@12-18/17 (6s) 50”, 16 (5d) 51”
Edit: the lower half of (9d) is still in the garden...and flowering...

DGS: 8D,S (2015)
F@n 12, 11, 13, 11, 12, 12+, 11+, 11&12 (groundhog damaged);
Three best tallest plants: 12 (9d) 32”, 11+ 38”+ (8d), 34” 13  (5s)
« Last Edit: 2019-08-09, 08:56:43 AM by B. Copping »