Author Topic: Let's build the best plant breeding forum on the Internet.  (Read 4326 times)

Diane Whitehead

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Re: Let's build the best plant breeding forum on the Internet.
« Reply #60 on: 2018-10-16, 07:45:17 PM »
I hope it will have a very good Search capability.
Victoria, British Columbia, Canada
cool mediterranean climate  warm dry summers, mild wet winters,  70 cm rain,   sandy soil

Joseph Lofthouse

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Re: Let's build the best plant breeding forum on the Internet.
« Reply #61 on: 2018-10-16, 08:18:12 PM »
I hope it will have a very good Search capability.

I hope so too. One of the motivating reasons for the existence of this forum, is that things posted to social media sites tend to disappear after a few days, never to be found again.

 With a good search feature, it might be less important to have specific categories. For example: Tomatoes, Sweet Potatoes.

A different forum that I moderate has a policy that a category can be added once there are 40 posts about that topic that could be added to the new category.
« Last Edit: 2018-10-16, 08:39:05 PM by Joseph Lofthouse »

Andrew Barney

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Re: Let's build the best plant breeding forum on the Internet.
« Reply #62 on: 2018-10-24, 02:06:51 PM »
I'm on board for letting the categories break out as needed.  I think the problem with the categories on HG were more that they were set up kind of "quick and dirty" when Alan created the board, and then were never changed at all AFAIK.  I would love separate Potato and Tomato boards.  I avoid tomato discussions anymore and would love them to exist in a bucket that I never have to look into.

Although I will undoubtedly adapt to whatever structure is chosen, I think I would organize by crop, rather than by family and I would leave everything in a broad grouping until it seems like it would be beneficial to break it out.  So, I can imagine that we might immediately want boards for Tomatoes and Potatoes under plant breeding.  I wouldn't make it a Solanaceae board because the family is just too big to be a useful grouping.  I wouldn't even want a Solanum board - still too big.

I would support these ideas.

equant

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Re: Let's build the best plant breeding forum on the Internet.
« Reply #63 on: 2018-10-29, 10:52:10 AM »
I'd like to see people's locations on the right side of a post (under their names/info etc).  Assuming it reflects their growing conditions, it's useful and can put the information they share into better context.

bill

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Re: Let's build the best plant breeding forum on the Internet.
« Reply #64 on: 2018-10-29, 01:21:13 PM »
equant, if you look in your profile, there is a section called "Personal Text."  If you enter your location there, it will appear under your user name.

This is not to be confused with the Location section, which is not currently shown anywhere.

reed

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Re: Let's build the best plant breeding forum on the Internet.
« Reply #65 on: 2018-10-30, 09:07:34 AM »
I'd like to see a category for Landrace and Grex building. I started to start a topic "What Landrace / Grex projects are you working on? " under plant breeding but thought I'd pop over here instead to see what others think.

I think of breeding as being more controlled and specific, moving a crop to a particular outcome, like I'm trying to do with my corn but most of my projects are much more hands off. Just planting as much as I can and letting the seeds and climate do much of the selection on their own. 

Anyway, whether it is under the existing breeding section or has a new one of it's own I really like reading about and seeing pictures of what others are doing in this area.




William S.

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Re: Let's build the best plant breeding forum on the Internet.
« Reply #66 on: 2018-10-30, 09:30:58 AM »
I'd like to see a category for Landrace and Grex building. I started to start a topic "What Landrace / Grex projects are you working on? " under plant breeding but thought I'd pop over here instead to see what others think.

I think of breeding as being more controlled and specific, moving a crop to a particular outcome, like I'm trying to do with my corn but most of my projects are much more hands off. Just planting as much as I can and letting the seeds and climate do much of the selection on their own. 

Anyway, whether it is under the existing breeding section or has a new one of it's own I really like reading about and seeing pictures of what others are doing in this area.

I think that would be a fine section to create.
Western Montana garden, glacial lake Missoula sediment lacustrian silty clay mollisoil sometimes with added sand in places. Zone 6A with 100 to 130 frost free days

Nicholas Locke

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Re: Let's build the best plant breeding forum on the Internet.
« Reply #67 on: 2018-10-30, 03:06:03 PM »
I'd like to see a category for Landrace and Grex building. I started to start a topic "What Landrace / Grex projects are you working on? " under plant breeding but thought I'd pop over here instead to see what others think.

I think of breeding as being more controlled and specific, moving a crop to a particular outcome, like I'm trying to do with my corn but most of my projects are much more hands off. Just planting as much as I can and letting the seeds and climate do much of the selection on their own. 

Anyway, whether it is under the existing breeding section or has a new one of it's own I really like reading about and seeing pictures of what others are doing in this area.
I second that....
"Maybe" said the farmer...

Andrew Barney

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Re: Let's build the best plant breeding forum on the Internet.
« Reply #68 on: 2019-08-10, 03:00:20 PM »
It is great to see everyone checking in.  We now have 32 members.  According to your profile data, we already have breeders of a lot of different crops:

Andean roots & tubers
Beans x4
Canna
Canteloupe/Musk melon x2
Carrot
Corn x4
Dahlia x2
Fig
Garlic x2
Kale x2
Leeks
Lettuce
Onions x3
Parsnip
Peas x3
Peppers
Plectranthus
Potato x6
Quinoa x2
Radish
Sea kale
Shallots
Squash/Pumpkin x5
Sweet potato/Ipomoea x5
Tomato x7
Watermelon x3
Wheat

This is cool.  Any way to see some updated forum statistics?

Might be interesting to see how many from each country?

bill

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Re: Let's build the best plant breeding forum on the Internet.
« Reply #69 on: 2019-08-19, 09:56:47 PM »
Here are the updated statistics.  It looks like we have 137 real and unique members.  There isn't enough country data to make a meaningful list right now.  51 members do not list any current breeding projects.  The projects of the remaining 86 members break down as follows:

The top 10:
Tomato32
Corn26
Bean17
Squash15
Potato14
Pea12
Watermelon10
Sweet potato9
Kale7
Melons7

Everything:
Achira1
Alliums3
Amaranth1
Andean tubers2
Arracacha1
Banana1
Barberry1
Basil1
Bean17
Beet3
Black nightshade1
Broad/Fava bean2
Burdock1
Canna1
Camas1
Carrot6
Chestnut1
Chia1
Chicory1
Chickpea2
Cilantro1
Citrus1
Corn26
Cotton1
Cowpea2
Cucumber2
Dahlia3
Eggplant1
Fennel1
Fig2
Flowers2
Forage1
Foxtail millet1
Garlic5
Grains1
Grasses1
Greens2
Hazelnut1
Hop1
Jerusalem artichoke4
Kale7
Leek3
Lettuce6
Lupine/Tarwi2
Mashua1
Melons7
Miner's Lettuce   1
Mustard2
Nuts1
Oak1
Oca1
Oil seed crops1
Onion5
Oregano1
Parsnip4
Pea12
Peanut1
Pecan1
Pepper6
Plectranthus1
Potato14
Potato/multiplier onion1
Pumpkin2
Quinoa2
Radish2
Raspberry1
Root chervil1
Runner beans2
Sea kale1
Shallot1
Skirret1
Sorghum3
Spinach1
Squash/Zucchini15
Strawberry1
Sunflower5
Sweet potato9
Tomatillo1
Tomato32
Tree fruits1
Turmeric1
Turnip2
Ulluco1
Watermelon10
Wheat1
Wormwood1
Yacon2
Yam (Dioscorea)1
Yampah2

Andrew Barney

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Re: Let's build the best plant breeding forum on the Internet.
« Reply #70 on: 2019-11-02, 07:44:43 AM »
Im starting to learn more about my soil. Do you think we could add soil type to the displayed information under our username like location is already displayed?

Richard Watson

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Re: Let's build the best plant breeding forum on the Internet.
« Reply #71 on: 2019-11-03, 10:21:24 AM »
But a few of us have our soil info in our signature.

I would like to see it where everyone has where on this earth they garden
Changeable year round climate with warming winters - just under 500mm average yearly rainfall. 20 years of soil improvements plus sub soil top soil reversal means my garden beds are about half metre deep. Below that is 100's of metres of alluvial out wash from the Southern
alps.

William S.

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Re: Let's build the best plant breeding forum on the Internet.
« Reply #72 on: 2019-11-03, 11:59:53 AM »
Soil is very interesting as are many factors predicting garden similarity. For instance when studying Joseph Lofthouse's website and writings I noticed that he had similar, climate, soils, and growing conditions. His crops do well for me. So soils as part of a larger similarity of conditions may be a important predictor of varietal success in a garden.

I just updated my profile. Andrews observation of increasing soil awareness is also true of me. The more I learn about my soil the more interesting it becomes to me. I've been adding sand to my garden for a long time because it works for me. However I think I may just be starting to understand why and how it works. This summer I grew tomatoes without irrigation. Added some sand mid way through to some of the worst soils and it seemed to reverse growth difficulties mainly through simple addition of soil water storage capacity.

Richard's soil information sounds rather dreamy.
Western Montana garden, glacial lake Missoula sediment lacustrian silty clay mollisoil sometimes with added sand in places. Zone 6A with 100 to 130 frost free days

Richard Watson

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Re: Let's build the best plant breeding forum on the Internet.
« Reply #73 on: 2019-11-03, 11:15:51 PM »
Its a bit low in clay though William so ive been adding it to the compost over the last year or so.
Changeable year round climate with warming winters - just under 500mm average yearly rainfall. 20 years of soil improvements plus sub soil top soil reversal means my garden beds are about half metre deep. Below that is 100's of metres of alluvial out wash from the Southern
alps.