Author Topic: Farming in Cahokia - Interesting Article  (Read 410 times)

Ferdzy

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Farming in Cahokia - Interesting Article
« on: 2019-03-29, 09:22:46 AM »
Short but intriguing article at Atlas Obscura about pre-Columbian farming around what is today St. Louis - it mentions some plants that I am not familiar with at all.

https://www.atlasobscura.com/articles/native-american-farming-cahokia

William S.

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Re: Farming in Cahokia - Interesting Article
« Reply #1 on: 2019-03-29, 10:19:43 AM »
Indigenous science has been massively underrated. The Chenopodium and Iva species mentioned I've heard of in other articles. Would be a good domestication project for someone nearby who could collect seeds.

The article talks a little bit about just how massively the indigenous people manipulated the environment to produce food. In California some of the permaculture type systems were massively productive. If you replace systems that direct feed humans with cattle and range hogs you move up on the food chain and in the process waste a unreal amount of food. Often this is still played out today in terms of feeding corn to cattle and pigs held in confinement facilities...
Western Montana garden, glacial lake Missoula sediment lacustrian silty clay mollisoil sometimes with added sand in places. Zone 6A with 100 to 130 frost free days

Ryan M Miller

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Re: Farming in Cahokia - Interesting Article
« Reply #2 on: 2019-09-24, 11:27:34 PM »
I have also heard of the Eastern Agricultural Complex. I am currently trying to get access to some erect knotweed (Polygonum erectum) to do some trial growing next year to see how much the plant already yields in seeds by weight per acre. If I am unable to grow the seeds out next year, I will try to find someone else with more land and experience who's willing to collaborate with me. I have been discussing this same topic over on permies.com.

Here is a link to the thread I started on the other forum:
https://permies.com/t/120420/Eastern-Agricultural-Complex-EAC

reed

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Re: Farming in Cahokia - Interesting Article
« Reply #3 on: 2019-09-30, 06:41:49 AM »
This is an interesting topic. I hope folks with experience with it will post lots of info. Ryan, I checked your link on permies. The grass cereals are of particular interest to me as I'v always been fascinated with the extreme variety of grasses that grow in my neighborhood. Unfortunately I am not at all good at identifying them  but I think the Hordeum pusillum and Phalaris caroliniana might both grow here.

Lots of our wild grasses grow seed heads that look a lot to me like barley, or wheat or oats but like I said I'm terrible at identification. I started just examining any I see for seeds that easily separate form the chaff and  are large enough they might be of use as food. So far not much luck.

I have an established patch of Phaseolus polystachios, interesting plant but not much on production. Always plant some Limas or runners near in hopes of a random cross but nothing yet. I've located two large wild patches but they are not making seeds hardly at all this year.

Pawpaws and persimmons are quite common, enough so that I just forage them rather than cultivate. I can barely grow sun roots as something always eats most of them.

I'm also experimenting with wild sweet potatoes Ipomoea pandurata, it interesting too. I think I'll start a new thread about it specifically.