Author Topic: TPS 2019  (Read 4046 times)

Doro

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Re: TPS 2019
« Reply #60 on: 2019-08-18, 01:08:32 AM »
That's good to know Bill, thanks! I was half way expecting that, but had some hope that they were actually testing it.

jocelyn

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Re: TPS 2019
« Reply #61 on: 2019-08-18, 03:48:35 AM »
So, how about the Ag Canada database, and the USDA spud database?  Are they also trialed under monoculture conditions, or mixed plantings?
I've been playing, under difficulties, with spuds from a probable Russian Blue.  Pollen parents are whatver I decide on at that moment, grin.
My time in the spud patch has been limited due to caregiving at the moment.  Some of my seed is open pollinated.  Seed parent is certain, as I bag the plants when the berries are getting close, so the critters don't carry off the fruits, grumble, grumble, growl:(
Right now, I have a line of blue foliaged, very furry leaved plants that the beetles don't eat unless they are really hungry.
Some of the spuds are blue fleshed, some blue peel only.  All have decent health in a bad blight year.  There are some whites too, no bitter taste.
I'm looking through dtabases, looking for other spuds to breed them with............

Rebsie Fairholm

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Re: TPS 2019
« Reply #62 on: 2019-08-19, 04:45:43 AM »
Maybe bribing the potato fairy with buttered mash wasn't such a silly idea ;D
I love that idea!

There do seem to be so many variables that affect flower fertility and berry setting, it's hard to make any judgement on what will work and what won't, even in the same garden from one year to the next. I had a couple of self-pollinated berries one time on a variety which produces only dry, misshapen anthers ... while another variety which has been used in many past crosses won't set a single fruit for me. The only thing we can do really is keep trying stuff, collect data, not give up hope and be very very patient.
Daughter of the Soil : suburban garden, south-west England

Doro

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Re: TPS 2019
« Reply #63 on: 2019-08-19, 01:50:53 PM »
 ;D
Now if I just could find out how to make the carrot fairy happy.
My carrots need help this year lol

Lauren

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Re: TPS 2019
« Reply #64 on: 2019-08-19, 10:01:57 PM »
The largest of my 3 potato seedlings was dying so I pulled it. No blossoms this year, and apparently no potatoes either. Not even little ones. So I guess I try again next year.

Ferdzy

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Re: TPS 2019
« Reply #65 on: 2019-09-12, 10:29:40 AM »
So I dug a couple of potatoes yesterday, that came up in the wrong spot and were dying down and so were removed as part of general clean up. One of them was actually quite interesting! I *think* it must be a seedling, because while the skin is russet (like Burbank) there were a few potatoes with odd knobby shapes, like Pink Fir Apple. It produced very few potatoes in spite of having lots of space, and attempted to produce a number of potatoes above ground on the stems. Just strange! Obviously not a keeper in and of itself. However, apart from the Blue Russians which produce buckets of seed balls under every condition, it was about the only potato to produce a generous 6 or 8 decent sized seed balls. We will definitely grow out some of the seeds, and maybe hang onto the parent for another year too.

Has anybody seen this tendency to want to make "air" potatoes before?

nathanp

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Re: TPS 2019
« Reply #66 on: 2019-09-13, 07:14:41 PM »
Aerial tubers are a sign that the stem or roots of the plant is damaged.  They can be saved for future seed tubers if large enough, but it is probably not a heritable trait.
« Last Edit: 2019-09-13, 08:10:02 PM by nathanp »

Ferdzy

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Re: TPS 2019
« Reply #67 on: 2019-09-13, 07:32:42 PM »
Ah, thank you. That's helpful. I wonder if maybe it is one of the Russet Burbanks. I didn't see how a seedling could have gotten into that spot. So, if for some reason the roots were damaged and the plant was stressed that might explain both the few and oddly shaped roots and the production of seed balls. At any rate, I'll be saving those seeds.

Doro

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Re: TPS 2019
« Reply #68 on: 2019-09-19, 02:27:11 AM »
I had some aerial tubers here and there on most varieties. For me they are mainly caused by slugs, they appear when the stems are eaten. Lots of slugs this year due to all the rain... just good I didn't grow much salad lol

We are getting the first ground frosts now and first air frost in the morning is close. Most mornings are around 2C now. Potato season is officially over. I'm harvesting and screening the TPS seedlings now.

The Unknown Early TPS were rubbish, they were badly affected by the cold and wet start of the season and I discarded all of them. No keepers.

The Linda TPS were indeed pollinated by something blue. They were ok, but nothing too special. I'll keep two fluffy starchy ones to see how they are doing next year, but they are probably no long term keepers.

The Heiderot F2 TPS were cool because of very even colour distribution through the potato flesh. They almost stayed the same colour when cooked. I'm keeping 2 with good colour that seem to be starchy but still firm.

The pictures have the raw potatoes on top and the cooked result below. Linda TPS: yellow fleshed long and the blueish one, Heiderot F2: purple and blue round ones.

nathanp

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Re: TPS 2019
« Reply #69 on: 2019-11-08, 09:15:12 PM »
Here are a few of my 2019 TPS seedlings that I plan to grow from tubers next year.



https://www.facebook.com/groups/KenoshaPotatoProject/permalink/10157821639267859/

Richard Watson

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Re: TPS 2019
« Reply #70 on: 2019-11-09, 12:40:51 PM »
Ive a TPS clone from years back that still persists, decided to look after it this summer as the colour of the leafs are quite striking, also produces a very dark purple tuber. 

Changeable year round climate, less so summertime, warming winters - just under 500mm average yearly rainfall. 20 years of soil improvements plus sub soil top soil reversal means my garden beds are about half metre deep. Below that is 100's of metres of alluvial out wash from the Southern
alps.

Diane Whitehead

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Re: TPS 2019
« Reply #71 on: 2020-02-15, 09:23:17 PM »
Are we going to carry on with this 2019 thread, or start a new one for 2020?

Today at our local Seedy Saturday there was one person selling bags of mixed tubers from seed, and packets of seeds too.  She also gave a lecture about growing from TPS.  (She can do this well, as she is an ethnobotanist and teaches at the university).

I was greatly cheered by this. Several years ago  I started putting packets of TPS on the seed exchange table and giving packets of seeds to people selling bags of named tubers for planting.  I wonder if those were offspring of some of my seeds.
Victoria, British Columbia, Canada
cool mediterranean climate  warm dry summers, mild wet winters,  70 cm rain,   sandy soil

Diane Whitehead

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Re: TPS 2019
« Reply #72 on: 2020-02-17, 09:51:25 AM »
TPS is being sold by a Canadian company, West Coast Seeds, based in Vancouver B.C.

This is the first year, and there is just one kind - Clancy F1
Victoria, British Columbia, Canada
cool mediterranean climate  warm dry summers, mild wet winters,  70 cm rain,   sandy soil

bill

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Re: TPS 2019
« Reply #73 on: 2020-02-17, 01:04:33 PM »
Clancy is the latest try at "uniform" tetraploid TPS.  There have been several of these over the years, including Explorer, Zolushka, and Catalina.  And those were preceded by a bunch of Soviet varieties, some of which are still available from a seller in Ukraine.  These have always been pretty disappointing compared to tuber grown potatoes, but I can only see mass market TPS as a good thing, since it will introduce more people to the idea.  I was sent a promotional packet this year and I plan to grow them out and review.

bill

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Re: TPS 2019
« Reply #74 on: 2020-02-17, 01:07:40 PM »
As far as this post goes, I don't have a strong opinion.  We could start a new thread or lop of the 2019 and keep going.