Author Topic: TPS 2019  (Read 1060 times)

Ferdzy

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Re: TPS 2019
« Reply #30 on: 2019-04-18, 07:24:14 PM »
It looks like there is an exception for "Home Garden Varieties" that are grown on less than 1 hectare.  That ought to accommodate most small breeding.

Ah? I didn't see that. (I still don't to be honest, but maybe I'm a little mesmerized by the fact that they want data via slides or CD.) But yes, that would solve the problem.


bill

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Re: TPS 2019
« Reply #31 on: 2019-04-18, 08:00:08 PM »
You have to piece it together from a couple other documents.  You can see it defined in the glossary on that page.  You can then find other docs with that term, but they don't go into a lot of detail.

nathanp

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Re: TPS 2019
« Reply #32 on: 2019-04-18, 09:34:17 PM »
I do not believe there are any reputably documented stories of anyone being harmed by TGA of any cultivated potatoes.  The most that is likely to occur is being sick.  I run into an occasional potato from TPS that is strongly bitter to my tongue (I taste the skins before cooking tubers from TPS). In which case I generally discard it.  I have run into two potatoes that have made me slightly ill, and the extent of that is having an upset stomach.  One is a landrace cultivar from coastal Chili called Papa Chonca, the other was a TPS seedling of mine.  In both cases eating the potatoes was fine until I ate a higher quantity of them, with no other food being eaten.  Both can easily be eaten by most people who are eating other foods or potatoes with them.  I have eaten both of them multiple times since then with no problems.  I probably do have a few others that have slightly high TGA, but we eat those with no problems or health concerns.

Wild potatoes aside, I think the percentage of TPS seedlings that I discard for concerns over TGA, has been somewhere between 0.2-0.3%% of seedlings.  Many of those I am growing also do have wild potatoes in their pedigrees.

Doro

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Re: TPS 2019
« Reply #33 on: 2019-04-19, 01:41:59 AM »
@Reed New plantbreeding projects are like rabbits ;D they multiply quickly.
What mulch material do you have available? I stay away from wood shavings or sawdust because they keep the soil cool, but they might be ideal in your situation if you apply them early.

I'm finally done repotting, 216 made it through the first round of selecting. Weak seedlings got discarded and I preferably kept seedlings showing colour in stems and leafs.
Highland Burgundy Red x Blå Congo gave the strongest seedlings, it had the biggest percentage of keepers. Seems like that cross was a good one.
I also got 2 freak plants from Heiderot Second gen. Kept them for now even though they are kind of small. Very narrow leafs that remind me of carrot leaf in tomato plants. It will be interesting to see how they develop through the season. Has anyone else seen carrot leaf in potatoes before? It is new to me.

Being in Europe I'm not able to sell any of my bred veg commercially. Basicly everything needs a license. I breed anyways, just because. Could sell things as ornamentals though lol

I'm not worried about glycoalkaloids, they taste horrible. Found one bitter one last year, a fairly unpleasant surprise biting into it. Any dangerous levels will not go unnoticed at the first taste test. I microwave them with very little water to not wash out things during boiling in a pot of water.

reed

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Re: TPS 2019
« Reply #34 on: 2019-04-19, 03:01:07 AM »
I don't bring much of anything extra into my garden, got burned on that a several years back with some horse manure and I don't trust bringing in hay or straw either. I do have a big pile of composting wood chips that I may start using. It came from the electric company when they cleared the lines along my road and I know nothing nasty has been sprayed or applied to it. It's been there three years now and is turning into some pretty good stuff.  Generally I just use what ever I scrounge up around the place.  Weeds that I pull, spent plats like bean vines or corn stalks and grass clippings.

When I cleanup my paths I use a sharp hoe to scrape the ground and end up  with green weeds mixed with soil. A pile of that hollowed out in the middle and filled with finished compost is what my little TPS patch is growing in. It's still a little depressed in the middle, I figure as they grow I'll fill in with more good compost and then mulch the whole thing with grass or the rotting wood chips. Trying to keep the ground a little cooler is a big part of it, along with conserving moisture.

Potatoes grow fine here, IF there is good rains but I'v had a couple near total crop failures in last few years from heat and drought.  That's why I had decided not to put much effort into them but I had those seeds and I had that pile of path scrapings so thought what the heck, might as well give it another try.

I'm not worried about the TGA either, I think I'm kind of hypersensitive to that awful taste. I'll just discard everything including seeds from any plant that makes potatoes with even a tiny hint of it. Poison or not, to me anything that tastes like that isn't fit to eat.   
« Last Edit: 2019-04-19, 03:10:32 AM by reed »

reed

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Re: TPS 2019
« Reply #35 on: 2019-04-27, 07:17:15 AM »
Here are some of my wee little TPS plants in my giant 3' x 7' patch. Little critters are slow to take off good but looks like the beginning of some true leaves. I'm wondering how long to wait to thin them out a little. I figure ideally they should probably be about a foot apart but I would only have seven left if I did that so i think I'll go with 6 - 8 inches. Hopefully that will be enough to see how they produce and to get some seeds.

About 1/2 of the patch is self pollinated White Superior, a variety we like a lot. 1/4 is the blue one from Joseph's mix and the only other one I ever got my own seeds from. The last 1/4 is the one form Oxbow Farm, described as tolerating heat. I have no clue of the genetics of any of them, just taking my chances they might cross, assuming they bloom.

I also have big row of tuber planted White Superior which are up good and unlikely to bloom along with these but I saves a few to plant later. And I have more White Superior TPS to plant next year.

Since potatoes are getting so iffy here with hot dry weather and limited ability to water, plus we don't have good overwinter storage I'll be real excited if they make something decent to eat ( from seed) even if it is just a little.

Direct seeding may not be optimal as far as production but it was pretty easy and I'm all about easy, will see how it turns out. 

« Last Edit: 2019-04-27, 07:39:59 AM by reed »

esoteric_agriculture

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Re: TPS 2019
« Reply #36 on: 2019-04-30, 04:02:26 PM »
TPS UPDATE-
I covered my potato seedlings with frost blankets Sunday night, as a frost was forecast. We did get a light frost, potato seedlings were very lightly burned on leaf margins and tips of newest growth only. Certainly nothing they won’t recover from in a week. Today the high was nearly 80, so growth should be strong now. Interestingly there was more damage to the diploids than the tetraploids.
Very deep mildly acidic clay loam with abundant sandstone and quartzite gravel and stones. Very high water table, Border of Koppen climate Oceanic and Humid Subtropical, USDA Zone 6b, very windy frost pocket valley at the foot of a lonely mountain, historic dairy and orchard county.

PaulJ

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Re: TPS 2019
« Reply #37 on: 2019-05-04, 11:59:17 AM »
TPS were a big loss this year sprouted around 30 seeds 6 made it then fungus gnats took out all but one which is side shooting now and doing well
Ill look forward to seeing what you get as my possibilities are limited : )

bill

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Re: TPS 2019
« Reply #38 on: 2019-05-05, 09:32:59 PM »
Interestingly there was more damage to the diploids than the tetraploids.

Most diploids are low dormancy phureja types, which were developed at lower elevations in the Andes.  They tend to have good heat tolerance and poor frost tolerance.  High dormancy stenotomum type diploids are the opposite, but much less common.

reed

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Re: TPS 2019
« Reply #39 on: 2019-05-14, 04:15:46 AM »
Well, a couple of my little plants did indeed croak. And ah um, most of the rest turned out to be volunteer pimpinellifolium tomatoes. I plucked the tomatoes out and now have a grand total of three TPS plants but they look pretty  good so I'll see how they turn out. 

Mike Jennings

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Re: TPS 2019
« Reply #40 on: 2019-05-14, 06:39:44 PM »
This year was the largest number of TPS lines I have planted. I had to scale back on space a little this year, so I only planted 6 seeds of each line. Germination was good, so I still ended up with more plants than can fit in my garden. I seeded them on 1/24/19, up-potted them once, and put them in the ground around late-March/early April. Our last frost was 2/27/19, and I would have liked to get them in the ground earlier, but we had so much rain that my garden was flooded until late-March.

A lot of my TPS plants are starting to flower and I have been cross pollinating them by hand (although bumblebees have been visiting them as well). I am really hoping to increase my production of TPS this year. So far, it's looking good. I have berries forming already on a lot of the plants from last years tubers.

Here's my list:
(Tetraploid)
Blue Belle
Skagit Wow
Riverwood
Shetland Pink
TLSF Pink
TLSF 12-17
Fenton Blue
Pinto
Papa Cacho

(Diploid)
Careta Amarilla
Chaucha Amarilla
Criolla Rosada
Round Burgundy
Skagit Valley Gold
Cultivariable Low Dormancy Diploid Mix


esoteric_agriculture

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Re: TPS 2019
« Reply #41 on: 2019-05-16, 12:50:24 PM »
Current update- had over 3” ( 8cm) rain the past week, and 3 nights in the lower 40’s F. ( 5 C) . Potatoes look ok still, desperately need hilled but soil is too wet to move around. I got a tractor sunk to the axels in mud last night right next to the potato row. The ruts filled up with water immediately. Hopefully things dry out some before anything rots. Will hill up the plants as soon as moisture situation allows.
Very deep mildly acidic clay loam with abundant sandstone and quartzite gravel and stones. Very high water table, Border of Koppen climate Oceanic and Humid Subtropical, USDA Zone 6b, very windy frost pocket valley at the foot of a lonely mountain, historic dairy and orchard county.

rowan

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Re: TPS 2019
« Reply #42 on: 2019-05-17, 12:41:21 AM »
With unusually warm weather for this time of year - jeese it's nearly winter here, only a single light frost so far, and barely any rain my second tps potato crop is still growing their tubers and flowering strongly.  By now I should have harvested small tubers from this crop but I am still impatiently waiting for frosts to kill off the tops.

I harvested mini tubers from these tps plants a few months ago and now I will be able to assess them properly. As long as the frosts hold off the tubers will continue to grow, but it is just so tempting to dig at them to see :)

I have some really good ones that will be kept for next season. Here are a few and I will have some more pics later at harvest. I am very pleased with these ones as they seem to be good producers in my poor soil, and taste great:
« Last Edit: 2019-05-17, 12:43:01 AM by rowan »
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Doro

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Re: TPS 2019
« Reply #43 on: 2019-05-17, 02:09:30 PM »
They look great!

I'm just done with planting out, frost nights made me keep them in the greenhouse for longer than I would have liked. Didn't plant them all, culled about 25%, but it's still plenty enough plants and I'm not sure if I dare to really count them hahaha.

esoteric_agriculture

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Re: TPS 2019
« Reply #44 on: 2019-05-23, 08:06:08 AM »
I managed to get my TPS potatoes hilled up for a second time last night. About 25% of the diploids are flowering now, and one or two of the tetraploids. So far the diploids are substantially larger, and all are starting to send up stolons like crazy. The deluge we’ve had has killed off maybe 6-8 plants, mostly tetraploids. No signs of disease or insects so far. I’ll try to get some pictures this weekend, the flowers are really lovely.
Very deep mildly acidic clay loam with abundant sandstone and quartzite gravel and stones. Very high water table, Border of Koppen climate Oceanic and Humid Subtropical, USDA Zone 6b, very windy frost pocket valley at the foot of a lonely mountain, historic dairy and orchard county.