Author Topic: TPS 2019  (Read 2090 times)

spacecase0

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Re: TPS 2019
« Reply #45 on: 2019-05-25, 12:08:42 AM »
of all the TSP I have grown,
only one over wintered
it is growing happily in my garden
I had hoped that I had more than one that got anywhere

Lauren

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Re: TPS 2019
« Reply #46 on: 2019-05-26, 09:06:06 AM »
I planted about 30 seeds and got five plants out in the garden. Still tiny, but OK so far. This is the first year I've gotten anything to plant, although I've been trying for about four years. If I can get seeds (or seed potatoes) from any of the five, I'll be OK. Otherwise just keep planting and trying until I run out of seeds.

Doro

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Re: TPS 2019
« Reply #47 on: 2019-05-26, 03:59:16 PM »
We had a cool week here with nights at 2-5C and days 10-15C. Some good rain too, probably around 90mm. The rain measuring tube overflowed lol so I don't know exactly. Next week seems to be the same, not much sunshine ahead.
So far growth is slow but steady, no transplant losses.

ImGrimmer

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Re: TPS 2019
« Reply #48 on: 2019-06-25, 03:08:38 PM »
Anyone has ever heard of this? It is a commercial ukrainian potatoe variety propagated by seeds.
It is still ebay but it might be interesting

Doro

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Re: TPS 2019
« Reply #49 on: 2019-06-26, 05:38:18 AM »
That's new to me.
And yeah it's eBay. Who knows what seed they will send. Can be a bunch of eggplants sprouting from it lol anything is possible on eBay.


There isn't much to say about my TPS plants. I lost a few to root rot because of the cold and wet weather. The survivors are either happy and strong plants that should start to flower in about a week or yellow sad looking things that can give up and keel over anytime.
It's a good year to select for rain and cold tolerance, but I feel sorry for the plants every time I look at them.

Lauren

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Re: TPS 2019
« Reply #50 on: 2019-06-26, 03:43:01 PM »
I got six--two are thriving. The main crop already has potatoes on it, and the two potato seed plants doing the best are about six inches tall. We'll see. At least I'm learning what they need. If I get seeds from them, great. If not, I'll take whatever tubers I get and try again next year.

Ferdzy

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Re: TPS 2019
« Reply #51 on: 2019-07-17, 09:13:25 AM »
We planted about half named potato varieties and half seedling potatoes, a mix of 1 and 2 years old this spring, some of which I am (was?) quite excited about.

I am now seeing that we have a potato virus. At first I was not too concerned as it doesn't look bad. About half the potatoes - interestingly, it's half the named varieties and half the seedlings, roughly - look like they have it. Unfortunately a little research suggests it's potato virus Y (PVY) which is a quite serious version of the mosaic virus. It can leave the potatoes with brown spots and lesions that make them inedible, even when the leaves don't look too bad. Apparently it is wreaking havoc in the potato industry. One of the problems is you get "typhoid Mary" varieties of potatoes which don't show it but spread it to other potatoes readily. I recall buying some potatoes in the spring at the grocery and being very unimpressed by their quality. I'd say, in retrospect, that they had this virus.

I am trying to decide what to do. Yank everything? Yank the ones the that show the virus? Wait to the end of the season and assess things then? It's in the garden now, clearly enough. In the past viruses have mostly been a one-year wonder then they have burnt themselves out and not reappeared the next year. (Fungi and bacteria are much more persistent). This has the look of something different, though. Any experience with this out there?

Doro

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Re: TPS 2019
« Reply #52 on: 2019-07-17, 11:28:27 AM »
I'm so sorry  :'(

The virus spreads via aphids and it can also infect other plants. Not only potatoes, also tomato, pepper or tobacco.
If you don't want to do a field test of your plants for resistance to virus y, it is a good thing to remove and bin all infected plants quickly and clean all tools.
First year infection (via aphids) can be fairly mild and you might get usable tubers, do not plant them next year though. Second year infection (from infected tubers) is more serious, causing stunted growth and little harvest.

bill

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Re: TPS 2019
« Reply #53 on: 2019-07-17, 04:38:46 PM »
Agdia offers a field test for PVY (and X) which is reasonably priced and easy to use:
https://orders.agdia.com/immunostrip-for-pvx-and-pvy-isk-41300

If there are plants that you want to save, you can at least test them and eliminate everything else.

PVY is quite annoying to deal with.  I worked for years to get it out of my plot, but it kept coming back.  I finally discovered that it was hiding in some dahlias.

Ferdzy

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Re: TPS 2019
« Reply #54 on: 2019-07-17, 07:02:46 PM »
Thanks, Doro and Bill.

We've dug out the worst looking plants and I took some photos. I'm going to show them to a potato specialist I am acquainted with. Actually, here is one:
https://www.pinterest.ca/pin/556053885242451119/ (Sorry, actual photo does not seem to want to attach). May be digging out a lot of potatoes this week... damn.

Doro

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Re: TPS 2019
« Reply #55 on: 2019-08-14, 03:24:59 AM »
So far my TPS plants gave nothing to write home about.
It's been too wet and cold early in the season and now late season is wet and cold again. Just lots of yellow leafs on small plants, cracked tubers and bland colours I'm not excited about.
Also lots of wart issues appearing in some of the crosses, going to discard all those lines. Susceptible to wart (or scab) is something I have to cull hard, it's a dead end in my garden.

But at least berry production is good this year.
I already collected some Asterix berries. It's rare to set any berries, but interesting to breed with in terms of resistance to various sicknesses. Hopefully I'll find some wart and scab free seedlings in this line next year.

Ferdzy

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Re: TPS 2019
« Reply #56 on: 2019-08-14, 06:40:09 AM »
Doro, it's been an odd, difficult year here too, although not as bad as yours I don't think.

So we pulled out all the potatoes that looked virused. The rest have looked pretty good and show no signs. Some of them are starting to look yellow but I think that is just the season moving on as opposed to any actual problem. One of the really productive seedlings dropped some leaves due to what looks like septoria leaf spot but it did not get too bad and they seemed to carry on regardless. We'll find out when we dig them. One of the really productive seedlings showed no signs of trouble at all so that's good.

Seed ball production has been frustrating. The Blue Russian as usual have produced quite a lot, other things not so much. The seedlings in particular seemed to flower profusely then abort. It was absurdly hot and dry when they were flowering so I still hope that they may fruit in the future.

I do have one Russet Burbank (?) that came up where they had been planted before and produce a couple of very tiny seed balls which fell off before they got very big. Once I've let them ripen a bit I will see if it looks like there are any viable seeds. I'm pretty sure this is the same potato that produced a seed ball with viable seeds 2 years ago, judging from where it came up. It seems to be just the one potato; the other Russet Burbanks as per their reputation produced nothing.

I think today is a good day to collect and label seed balls, and see what I have.


Ferdzy

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Re: TPS 2019
« Reply #57 on: 2019-08-15, 06:12:13 AM »
So, yesterday I collected all the seed balls I could find except for a couple that got marked and left on the plants for further development. Both of those were on Russet Burbank.

Otherwise, as expected, there were about 2 cups of Blue Russian Berries. I include one plant which was grown from seed from Russian Blue, but which looks a lot like Russian Blue.

Second most productive was Purple Viking, with about half a cup of seed balls.

The remainder are about 8 very small seed balls from one of the seedlings, which were dropped or aborted fairly early. I am hoping to extract some seeds after leaving them to ripen for a while, and one collected Russet Burbanks with the 2 still on plants.

Russet Burbank is supposed to be female fertile only, and very very shy of producing seeds - usually in "lab" conditions only. I do not know if what I have is not actually Russet Burbank even though that's what it was sold to me as, or if something else is going on. I am hopeful it's something else. We had the kind of cool, steady temperatures that Russet Burbank requires to produce seeds both last year and this spring. Also, it is only one plant that has produced seeds - I am certain that the one seeding this year is a tuber that got missed during harvest last year as it is coming up in the exact same place as the plant that produced a seed ball last year. I understand mutations are not uncommon in potatoes and maybe I have a plant that has mutated to be moderately more fertile? However, I cannot dismiss the idea that what I have is not Russet Burbank but some other very similar Russet potato sold under the wrong name. Still, all the other Russet plants have been firmly non-fertile.

We did not grow out any new seedlings this year but continued with seedlings from 2016 and 2018. I'm pretty sure the herd is going to thinned to a sliver this year, so maybe we will be growing some of these seeds out next spring.

Doro

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Re: TPS 2019
« Reply #58 on: 2019-08-15, 12:54:28 PM »
The odd and difficult years seem to become more frequent for all of us. Sigh.

My early and mid season varieties had perfect cool conditions for amazing flowers and berry setting.
The late varieties flowered during our hottest two weeks and hardly kept any berries.
The extremely late ones are just starting to flower, will see if the berries ripen enough to have viable seed, before frost comes.
Staggered planting did not work out very well this year, didn't get to make the crosses I had planned. But next year I'll get a new try :)

I think potatoes have their own mind regarding flowers, pollen and seed production. I grow varieties that officially flower rarely, yet they flower almost every year in my garden. Others are supposed to not set berries or have no pollen, but in some years they still make the odd seed ball or produce a tiny bit of pollen. I got berries from Asterix, King Edward, Pentland Javelin and Highland Burgundy Red. All of them are labeled as 'no berries' when looking at the potato variety database. Not sure why it worked, but I'll gladly accept it. Maybe bribing the potato fairy with buttered mash wasn't such a silly idea ;D who knows.
I try to keep set potatoes from plants that grew healthy and flowered nicely. Over the years I think they improved by doing this, but I don't have any hard data to prove it. Just a feeling.

bill

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Re: TPS 2019
« Reply #59 on: 2019-08-17, 11:40:12 PM »
The Eurpopotato database notes berrying under monocrop conditions.  So, if a variety is male sterile, it is certain to be noted there as "no berries".  If you grow such a variety near other varieties that can pollinate, they may produce berries.