Author Topic: Tomato drought induced transposons  (Read 153 times)

William S.

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Tomato drought induced transposons
« on: 2019-09-17, 07:36:06 AM »
Interesting article re: drought induced transposons. Hmm.

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/09/190916143949.htm
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Lauren

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Re: Tomato drought induced transposons
« Reply #1 on: 2019-09-17, 06:53:03 PM »
"Junk DNA" is an oxymoron if I ever heard one.

This study supports my own feelings about inducing drought tolerance or any other desired trait by stressing the plants in a particular direction. Personally I think that the farmers in the midwest should be keeping seed from the corn/wheat/bean plants that survived in water, rice farmers should be keeping seed from plants that grew in dry ground, and so on. If the plant is severely stressed, i believe it's going to activate the genes that will help its seeds survive.

reed

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Re: Tomato drought induced transposons
« Reply #2 on: 2019-09-17, 07:35:44 PM »
Yea, if there is anything too it at all, I don't see why it would apply just to tomatoes. I'm certainly keeping the seeds from the single little watermelon I got this year. I didn't plant any this year but a drought stunted little volunteer vine made a single yummy little fruit about the size of a softball. Inside was thick layer of white inside the rind then faint yellow and a touch of pink around the seeds. It was all quite good, even the unappealing looking white part.

It only had abut 20 or so fully matured seeds, all the others apparently aborted, just tiny little white things. Generally I just pitch melon seed into my mix but I'm saving these separate to make sure some get planted next ear. 




William S.

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Re: Tomato drought induced transposons
« Reply #3 on: 2019-09-17, 08:56:33 PM »
Article says it works on multiple species.
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Lauren

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Re: Tomato drought induced transposons
« Reply #4 on: 2019-09-17, 09:03:14 PM »
I saw the same thing in the first year of my watermelon landrace. I deliberately stressed the plants by not watering, planting in bad soil and planting much too early. The first melon to mature had only a handful of seeds, but spaces for many more. I speculate that the drought stress or nutrient stress forced it to concentrate on the seeds that started to mature first.

I'll watch for it if the dry garden tomato starts bearing. It survived the summer with no water at all, but no fruit yet. The other "dry" tomato is in another area of the yard, looks dead but is still putting out blossoms. Three fruit so far, and another on the vine. If I decide to pick it I'll check the number of seeds. I'm considering just letting it fall and see what comes up in the spring.

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Re: Tomato drought induced transposons
« Reply #5 on: 2019-09-18, 04:29:33 AM »
I don't know what's up with my tomatoes this year but they haven't been watered at all and are producing wonderfully. It isn't a matter genetics I don't think as they are all doing it pretty uniformly.

We lost a lot early to squirrels but then a sweet little hawk showed up and fixed that for us. Since then we have canned all the juice and whole tomatoes we have room for and they are still putting out. Super dry air I suppose has kept disease at bay, I don't know why they are still going so well without water but I'll take it. Saving lots of seeds, of course. 

Looking back I have probably wasted a lot of good stuff. Used too I would not even considered saving seed from such a puny little melon, I doubt I would even tasted it. I know I'v had such things happen before and just discarded them.

William S.

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Re: Tomato drought induced transposons
« Reply #6 on: 2019-09-18, 06:10:02 AM »
I think ordinary tomato genetics are underrated, we might be way to nice to them. I thought I was being pretty mean to them, and they are doing great.

Lousy soil check

No water check

No season extension check

Though this year the weather was favorable.

Biggest genetic drift I noticed was away from blue tomatoes. I think that happened in 2018 when it froze early. I think the blue skin slows a tomato down a bit. 
« Last Edit: 2019-09-18, 06:11:42 AM by William S. »
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Lauren

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Re: Tomato drought induced transposons
« Reply #7 on: 2019-09-18, 07:56:43 AM »
I did plant my tomatoes too early (deliberately) and those planted out late are doing better as plants, but those planted early are still producing the same.