Author Topic: Lima Beans  (Read 560 times)

reed

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Re: Lima Beans
« Reply #15 on: 2019-03-30, 03:02:54 AM »
I'v never grow soy beans, wouldn't know what to do with them if I did but they apparently grow well here so might look into it. My Lima bean project is going to be pretty small as to allow more room for other projects. I'll mix up the new bush types in about a forty foot row with a few of my pole types mixed in. That should increase my seed of the bush types and hopefully start the crossing process between the two.

Another new to me crop is cow peas. I have some seed from trades that are getting a little old so I'm gonna find a spot for them this year.

esoteric_agriculture

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Re: Lima Beans
« Reply #16 on: 2019-04-06, 07:21:28 AM »
I havenít found Pole Limaís to be as productive as Pole common beans. Pole Limaís are somewhat marginal for my climate, I imagine they are much more productive farther south. Pole Limaís have ridiculously vigorous vines that flatten any trellis or tepee Iíve yet to devise. I am however a great fan of bush Limas. Iíve grown Henderson, Jackson Wonder, and Pennsylvania Dutch Red, and the PA Dutch Red is absolutely the best here. For me, Cowpeas are by far the most productive dry legume, followed by bush Limaís. Both Limaís and Cowpeas have effectively no insect or disease issues for me, and are far more heat and drought tolerant than common beans. The Limaís do have some issues with molding in the pod, but I find it less than with many common beans. I manage dry bean harvests by hand picking fully dry pods on dry afternoons into labeled buckets or feed sacks. That almost totally eliminates molding issues. I only use Limaís as a dry bean as they are to miserable to shell out green. I made the decision a few years back to eliminate all full size pole beans of any type and to only grow bush or half runners. If I had more sense than sentimental feelings Iíd eliminate common beans as well- they are terribly disease, insect and mold prone, donít handle heat and drought well, but I enjoy them for a variety of reasons.
Very deep mildly acidic clay loam with abundant sandstone and quartzite gravel and stones. Very high water table, Border of Koppen climate Oceanic and Humid Subtropical, USDA Zone 6b, very windy frost pocket valley at the foot of a lonely mountain, historic dairy and orchard county.

reed

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Re: Lima Beans
« Reply #17 on: 2019-04-07, 02:46:46 AM »
I have shifted almost completely to pole types partly because I don't like stooping over to harvest but mostly because such bad mold and dirt problems with bush types. I agree though, the overly giant vines of most Limas are a real pain, that's why I hope to find / breed some that have nicely behaved vines that don't go much over six feet or so. This will be my first time growing bush Limas.

Same with common beans, I now have 1/2 a dozen that truly do only get about five feet tall and I have ten new ones this year from a collector in Illinois. He calls them semi-runners rather than half runners. I like that definition cause most so called half runners I'v grown still got ten feet plus. I also added it to the dry mix but I'm keeping one called Refugee in semi isolation as well. It gets about four feet tall, very productive and good as green beans, little disease problems too.