Author Topic: Breeding for Late Blight Resistant Tomatoes  (Read 9564 times)

Steph S

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Re: Breeding for Late Blight Resistant Tomatoes
« Reply #30 on: 2021-10-03, 06:17:25 AM »
Yeah!  I read the description at Johnnies - sounds like Galahad would make a good standard to compare disease resistance with my home bred varieties, even though LB has not been the issue here, because it has such a spectrum of resistances. 

Garrett Schantz

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Re: Breeding for Late Blight Resistant Tomatoes
« Reply #31 on: 2021-10-03, 09:37:42 AM »
Crossing Iron Lady F1 with Galahad F1 could be an option if someone really wanted Early Blight resistance.

I sometimes get early blight, almost always end up with late blight by the end of the season.

Should be easy enough to select for most of the blight resistant traits. I would have to send the offspring out to people who have problems with Septoria, Nematodes, Grey leaf spot, Spotted Wilt and fusarium wilt to test for the other resistances.

William S.

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Re: Breeding for Late Blight Resistant Tomatoes
« Reply #32 on: 2021-10-03, 03:00:10 PM »
After growing it again this year I am certain that what I've been growing as dehybridizing Lizzano is actually a stable early red micro dwarf and I've no idea if it has any relation to real Lizzano F1. It was quite similar to "pinnochio" micro dwarf which I also grew.  Would need to grow out some real lizzano F1 a few generations to know I guess. Not sure but I think we decided that Lizzano F1 does NOT have both PH2 and PH3 homozygous? Which might be the end of my Lizzano experiments.
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Arjan vD

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Re: Breeding for Late Blight Resistant Tomatoes
« Reply #33 on: 2021-12-01, 10:41:18 AM »
This year our weather was really bad, spring was very cold and summer was very wet and because of that almost all my tomatoes were infected with late blight, so this was a good year to evaluate which varieties have some real resistance against late blight.

The ones that dit well were Galahad, Damsel, matt's wild cherry, solanum pimp.LA1269 and from the Joseph Lofthouse strains I had one of the Wildlings with real good resistance. The other wildlings were all heavily affected with late blight.
The ones that did poorly were
Skykomish, Big Hill, Sasha's altai, Oaxacan Jewel, Buffalo sun, Q-series, Bh- series, most of the wildings except one, pimp.LA0417, Piennolo X LA0417, Sungold F1,North Queen and Primabella

I also grew a F2 of a cross of Weight in Gold and Dwarf Champion Improved outside and it wasn't late blight resistant but one of the plants had a much better tolerance so I kept seed of that one.

I hope this information will be helpfull


Roland

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Re: Breeding for Late Blight Resistant Tomatoes
« Reply #34 on: 2021-12-01, 12:40:03 PM »
Galahad is very good, how is the taste in comparison with his half brother Damsel?

Strange you are Primabella was disappointing?
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Nicollas

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Re: Breeding for Late Blight Resistant Tomatoes
« Reply #35 on: 2021-12-01, 01:24:05 PM »
Interesting, Skykomish and primabella are supposed to have some LB resistance.

We get a pretty bad year too (France), and wildings and Q-series all have succumbed to LB. Only Iron Lady F1 and some plants from BH had some resistance.

Have you been able to taste the resistant wildling ?

Adrian

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Re: Breeding for Late Blight Resistant Tomatoes
« Reply #36 on: 2021-12-01, 01:32:37 PM »
 The french climate is extremly variable one year on other.
We can have a extrem dry and hot year as a extrem humid year.
I have try cross between potato leaf x wispy leaf tomato this year for have a great resistance at the rain period followed of the heatwave.
The better for me was canestrino di lucca.It was very surprising and i don't know these  genes resistance against the blight.I doubt she has ph2 but it the most resistant!

I think the heterosis effect can play on the blight resistance and others diseases.A promiscious tomato is for me a good solution.
« Last Edit: 2021-12-01, 02:28:50 PM by Adrian »

Roland

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Re: Breeding for Late Blight Resistant Tomatoes
« Reply #37 on: 2021-12-01, 02:29:17 PM »
It seems Skykomish have only ph2 genes and no ph3 genes.
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William S.

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Re: Breeding for Late Blight Resistant Tomatoes
« Reply #38 on: 2021-12-01, 07:22:14 PM »
Galahad F1 sounds nice but I don't want it terribly since I already have so much Iron Lady F2 seed saved from last summer.
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Garrett Schantz

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Re: Breeding for Late Blight Resistant Tomatoes
« Reply #39 on: 2021-12-01, 07:43:41 PM »
Almost none of Joseph's wild series did that well for me either. I'm going to end up selecting for blight resistance heavily, next year. I'm assuming that there's some good traits present in there somewhere.

Planning on crossing Wild Gem with exserted orange or something similar, as all my Wild Gem plants were heavily resistant to whatever type of blight that I had this year. Wild Gem was slightly exserted - hoping that this aids in selection for exsertion. After that, I can cross the resistant Wild series types and continuously select out what performs the best for me.

Pretty much all of my habrochaites except for Joseph's landrace handled the blight well enough.

Probably the case that Joseph doesn't have selection pressures for blight. I should be able to help out a bit with that.

Might play around with Galahad as well.

William S.

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Re: Breeding for Late Blight Resistant Tomatoes
« Reply #40 on: 2021-12-01, 08:42:30 PM »
Wild Gem sounds fun. Wild Gem x Exserted Orange sounds like a great plan.

I think it is definitely the case that Joseph much like myself has little access to blight. Personally my main hope for blight breeding is to mail off F2s to someone like you who actually has a shot at testing them.
« Last Edit: 2021-12-01, 09:49:55 PM by William S. »
Western Montana garden, glacial lake Missoula sediment lacustrian parent material and shallow 7" silty clay loam mollisoil topsoil sometimes with added sand in places. Zone 6A with 100 to 130 frost free days

Arjan vD

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Re: Breeding for Late Blight Resistant Tomatoes
« Reply #41 on: 2021-12-02, 04:44:26 AM »
What might be interesting is that the wildling with good late blight resistance had a bit different leaf than the other plants. It was a large sprawling indeterminate vine and it had a bit less hair on the leaves than the other wildlings.
Flowers were a bit on the small side and were not promiscuous. Fruit was about 3 tot 5cm in diameter and orange yellow bicolor.

Could it be that it has some pimpinellifolium in its genetics? Unfortunately I don't have a picture of the plant.

William S.

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Re: Breeding for Late Blight Resistant Tomatoes
« Reply #42 on: 2021-12-02, 05:42:27 AM »
What might be interesting is that the wildling with good late blight resistance had a bit different leaf than the other plants. It was a large sprawling indeterminate vine and it had a bit less hair on the leaves than the other wildlings.
Flowers were a bit on the small side and were not promiscuous. Fruit was about 3 tot 5cm in diameter and orange yellow bicolor.

Could it be that it has some pimpinellifolium in its genetics? Unfortunately I don't have a picture of the plant.
I bet they about all have some pimpinellifolium if as we suspect the early reds like Jagodka, NoID, and Brad have some introgression. Hillbilly sounds like a true heirloom. From the penellii side there was some sort of standard reds used. Though Andrew was quite keen to add the second penellii rootstock because the red used contributed an important resistance gene. All of which track to specific introgressions  most of which when I Googled track back to pimpinillifolium. I'm not sure that second penellii rootstock is yet in the most advanced populations though. I have plenty of seed still though. Though I suspect the first was probably similar.

Edit: cv. VF36 is the domestic on what I think was the first penellii. Probably a boring lab red though I failed to find details on quickly. The second penellii line was NC84173 which is a little confusing because it tracks to both a red parent line and some sources list it as the original line name for "Mountain Gold" which cannot be true without an additional cross as the red is determinate and the yellow indeterminate. Though a little irrelevant because the latter to my knowledge has not yet made it to elite status in the project.
« Last Edit: 2021-12-02, 07:52:41 AM by William S. »
Western Montana garden, glacial lake Missoula sediment lacustrian parent material and shallow 7" silty clay loam mollisoil topsoil sometimes with added sand in places. Zone 6A with 100 to 130 frost free days

Roland

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Re: Breeding for Late Blight Resistant Tomatoes
« Reply #43 on: 2021-12-02, 12:13:39 PM »
Galahad F1 sounds nice but I don't want it terribly since I already have so much Iron Lady F2 seed saved from last summer.

Why will u go on with Iron Lady F2?
there are much better and also homozygous for ph2 and ph3:
Galahad, very good taste
Mountaineer Pride (child of Iron Lady), not a good taste

I understooth Iron Lady is very bad tasting.
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William S.

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Re: Breeding for Late Blight Resistant Tomatoes
« Reply #44 on: 2021-12-02, 12:54:25 PM »
Why will u go on with Iron Lady F2?
there are much better and also homozygous for ph2 and ph3:
Galahad, very good taste
Mountaineer Pride (child of Iron Lady), not a good taste

I understooth Iron Lady is very bad tasting.

I do a lot of thinking out loud! Now that you have asked my realization is that I am being extraordinarily cheap. It looks like a packet of Galahad F1 organic from Johnny's would cost me $12.15 usd including shipping.

I'll probably end up getting a packet as that isn't a good reason.
Western Montana garden, glacial lake Missoula sediment lacustrian parent material and shallow 7" silty clay loam mollisoil topsoil sometimes with added sand in places. Zone 6A with 100 to 130 frost free days