Author Topic: Plant breeders without borders  (Read 848 times)

Anthony.leddin

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Plant breeders without borders
« on: 2019-02-21, 04:33:27 PM »
My name is Anthony Leddin and I am developing an NGO called Plant breeders without borders (www.pbwob.org ). I thought I would throw this idea out to you all and let me know what you think. The idea is to get plant breeders to volunteer their time to train smallholder farmers in developing countries how to breed in underutilised crops. I thought the network might be able to help out by developing germplasm in crops where there is little diversity available and this could be then sent to the projects so the smallholder farmers had something to start with. We are currently working on a list of underutilised crops that are of interest. If you want to help out by being a volunteer or helping develop germplasm at home for projects let me know and feel free to ask any questions or give any suggestions, thanks for your help

William S.

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Re: Plant breeders without borders
« Reply #1 on: 2019-02-21, 07:22:35 PM »
What is your list so far?

The book "how to grow more vegetables" lists I think seven high calorie density root vegetables. Amongst them is an unusual vegetable called salsify in the genus Tragopogon. I plan to try growing it this year for the first time. There are only a couple varieties. If it grows well I hope to cross two varieties. It might be an possible list addition.
Western Montana garden, glacial lake Missoula sediment lacustrian clay mollisoil sometimes with added sand in places. Zone 6A

triffid

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Re: Plant breeders without borders
« Reply #2 on: 2019-02-21, 07:48:37 PM »
Hi Anthony,

I see that the project has partnered with Bayer for breeding work with indigenous varieties in Indonesia.

What is the legislative status of the starter-germplasm developed for the smallholders?

Anthony.leddin

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Re: Plant breeders without borders
« Reply #3 on: 2019-02-21, 07:51:23 PM »
it really depends on what the locals in the developing countries are wanting to work with here are few of the species that we are testing the water with:
Grains
Fino
Canihua
Jobs tears
Triticale
Buckwheat
amaranthus
quinoa
millet

Pulses
Lab Lab
Bambara groundnut
Longbean
Mung bean
Adzuki bean
Jicama

Roots and tubers
Yam
Cassava
Konjac
Purple Yam
Yackon
Ulloco

Vegetables
Jews mallow
Kan kong
Purslane
Papalo
Caihua

Anthony.leddin

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Re: Plant breeders without borders
« Reply #4 on: 2019-02-21, 07:54:43 PM »
all germplasm is made freely available through the crop trust germplasm resource centres and it is the smallholder farmers and their local partners that own the varieties

William S.

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Re: Plant breeders without borders
« Reply #5 on: 2019-02-21, 08:04:12 PM »
Could we contribute using OSSI pledged material?
Western Montana garden, glacial lake Missoula sediment lacustrian clay mollisoil sometimes with added sand in places. Zone 6A

Anthony.leddin

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Re: Plant breeders without borders
« Reply #6 on: 2019-02-21, 09:02:09 PM »
I can't see why not that is up to your network of breeders to decide

Ocimum

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Re: Plant breeders without borders
« Reply #7 on: 2019-02-22, 04:24:23 AM »
all germplasm is made freely available through the crop trust germplasm resource centres and it is the smallholder farmers and their local partners that own the varieties

Hi, is only the germplasm made available, or also the right to the germplasm?
Do you have some kind of material transfer agreements (MTA)?

And do you only breed with local material, or also exchange material between countries? If you exchange, is it informally or do you work according to the Nagoya Protocol?

Many questions...  ;)

Carol Deppe

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Re: Plant breeders without borders
« Reply #8 on: 2019-02-22, 04:12:04 PM »
There are three sponsors. One is Bayer, ie Bayer/Monsanto/Seminis.

A second is ISF. Its purpose seems to be "harmonizing" plant breeding regulations. This is code for strengthening and extending the control of the gene giants over seed and making farmers ever more dependent and helpless. And extending that system even to third world countries.

Cant tell much about the third sponsor.

Anthony, you say that the local farmers will "own" the varieties. Do you mean these will be controlled by them and proprietary? That would be better than Bayer/Monsanto/Seminis owning them, but would still strengthen and extend the privatizing of the seed supply and the extending of the model that all seed should be proprietary rather than accessible without restriction to all.

Or do you mean that the final varieties will be available without restrictions, MTAs, licenses, or royalties to any who want them?

B. Copping

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Re: Plant breeders without borders
« Reply #9 on: 2019-02-24, 01:16:21 AM »
For those who would “develop germplasm at home”:
Do you intend to supply germplasm from which to derive cultivars? (Or offer that as an option.)
If so, under what terms?

TIA

My name is Anthony Leddin and I am developing an NGO called Plant breeders without borders (www.pbwob.org ). I thought I would throw this idea out to you all and let me know what you think. The idea is to get plant breeders to volunteer their time to train smallholder farmers in developing countries how to breed in underutilised crops. I thought the network might be able to help out by developing germplasm in crops where there is little diversity available and this could be then sent to the projects so the smallholder farmers had something to start with. We are currently working on a list of underutilised crops that are of interest. If you want to help out by being a volunteer or helping develop germplasm at home for projects let me know and feel free to ask any questions or give any suggestions, thanks for your help

Anthony.leddin

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Re: Plant breeders without borders
« Reply #10 on: 2019-02-25, 12:48:46 PM »
I hope I answer all the questions. The germplasm that would be sent to projects would not be finished cultivars but early generation material. Part of the project is to teach smallholder farmers how to plant breed so they need to look at the variation that is available select parents and do the crosses. If the supplier of the seed wanted an MTA signed that could be done through the local  partner in the project who help the farmers produce the variety these are usually universities. The farmers will take ownership of the variety and market it through the help of the local partner. Bayer are a sponsor of the project but have no ownership of the germplasm developed. The only other partners are crops for the future who specialise in underutilized crop development and the international seed federation who represent the international seed agencies and also valley seeds whom I work for and support the work that I do. I hope this answers all the questions thanks
Anthony

Carol Deppe

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Re: Plant breeders without borders
« Reply #11 on: 2019-02-25, 06:40:05 PM »
That still doesn't tell me the legal status of the varieties the farmers produce. Are they public domain varieties accessible to all with no MTAs or other restrictions? Or not?

Anthony.leddin

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Re: Plant breeders without borders
« Reply #12 on: 2019-02-26, 02:25:11 PM »
All material developed in the program must be lodged in a germplasm bank for free avail avail to anyone to use. The variety will be owned by the smallholder farmers so it is up to them what they want to do with it. I hope that answers your question thanks Anthony

B. Copping

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Re: Plant breeders without borders
« Reply #13 on: 2019-02-26, 04:42:58 PM »
I applaud the idea of empowering people by encouraging plant breeding.
If nothing else, after learning to save seeds, maintain varieties, and how to develop a variety, there is a much greater appreciation for high quality seeds.
In turn, this makes makes clear the value of quality varieties (offered by reputable commercial or non-commercial sources).

I’m afraid I still find your answers vague. Please help me understand.

Public Domain. Yes or No.
Available with a MTA. Yes or No.
Nagoya protocol. Yes or No.

TIA

Olaf Nurlif

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Re: Plant breeders without borders
« Reply #14 on: 2019-02-26, 04:51:33 PM »
Nagoya protocol. Yes or No.

I don't think someone could opt out of the Nagoya protocol, right?
At least in countries that ratified it.