Author Topic: Direct Seeded Tomato Project  (Read 3207 times)

naiku

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Re: Direct Seeded Tomato Project
« Reply #60 on: 2019-06-14, 10:48:18 PM »
What's Fairy Hollow? I don't see any information on it off-site. Edit: Nevermind. I tried another search engine and found information!
« Last Edit: 2019-06-15, 01:23:12 AM by naiku »

William S.

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Re: Direct Seeded Tomato Project
« Reply #61 on: 2019-06-15, 03:51:06 PM »
Found a small Fern/Silvery Fir Tree descendant. Likely from the interspecies hybrids. Percentages are clearly lower than one would expect on the interspecies hybrids even accounting for lower germination. I suspect It's that slow start hab and penellii embue. Must be a rare seedling doesn't have that.

I put a significant amount of a exserted (in the F1) F2 domestic with a potato leaf grandmother in. Over in the transplant garden first couple blooms showing. Not exserted so far. Rather beefsteak type blooms and not exserted. Could have picked up some pollen from the surrounding Big Hills. Though Big Hill is open, but in a different way. Thus earliest blooms could be a hybrid of a hybrid.

Curious about what it would take to purge all closed flowers from a population.

The potato leaf fairy hollow that segregated out of my transplanted ones has changed as it's grown. The habrochaites genes have modified the potato leaf in an intriguing way- elongated, a little extra fuzzy, and neat looking.
« Last Edit: 2019-06-15, 09:50:55 PM by William S. »
Western Montana garden, glacial lake Missoula sediment lacustrian clay mollisoil sometimes with added sand in places. Zone 6A

William S.

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Re: Direct Seeded Tomato Project
« Reply #62 on: 2019-06-23, 05:16:53 PM »
Finished the first round of direct seeded patch weeding. Also planted out the last of the transplants this weekend. Tight buds on the oldest/first weeded direct seeded tomatoes. Haven't watered anything yet- need to fix the well controller. Maxima squash looks sad. Moschata much happier.

Over in the transplant tomato garden the Peruvianum are quite pretty and in full bloom at least about half. Half of them are from an super early plant in my 2018 garden, the other half from really large fruited ones from Josephs 2018 garden.. The arcanum are coming along, both accessions. I see one with tight buds. I have one chilense left. The galapagense and cheesemanii Andrew sent are growing. Penellii crosses are all over the place phenology and size wise. Highly variable. Have one F1, one pure, and the rest are F3. Half habrochaites look good. Potential 3/4 habrochaites looks good. Domestics and pimps look good. The pimp from Andrew remains modestly exserted. Exsertion overall is less in domestics than I would have predicted based on parentage.
« Last Edit: 2019-06-23, 09:27:24 PM by William S. »
Western Montana garden, glacial lake Missoula sediment lacustrian clay mollisoil sometimes with added sand in places. Zone 6A

William S.

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Re: Direct Seeded Tomato Project
« Reply #63 on: 2019-06-28, 04:29:09 PM »
Well, I have precisely one flower open in the direct seeded patch. If I had to guess I would say it's a sweet cherriette.

Over in the transplant patch I found a few fruits. Made a few deliberate crosses too. Big Hill is a joy to work with. Sturdy stigmas!
« Last Edit: 2019-06-28, 06:48:04 PM by William S. »
Western Montana garden, glacial lake Missoula sediment lacustrian clay mollisoil sometimes with added sand in places. Zone 6A

William S.

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Re: Direct Seeded Tomato Project
« Reply #64 on: 2019-07-05, 09:26:25 AM »
Just went out to land. Couldn't find much pollen to work with from prospective pollen parents. Currently 60 fairenheit supposed to hit 80 fairenheit today. Suspect not in ideal temp range for pollen release? Or maybe too much dew. Or maybe just not enough flowers of the right age for good pollen release available. Found a little pollen on a exserted pimp type Andrew sent. Pollinated one Big Hill Stigma with it. Found a little Blue Ambrosia pollen from a single flower. Put that on another single stigma of Big Hill X f2.

In the direct seeded patch lots more flowers showing up. Saw one that's probably a Blue Ambrosia volunteer based on location and exserted stigma, one likely to be a Big Hill X f2, and some likely to be Sweet Cherriette. Interesting. Plants are much larger and sturdier than last weekend.
« Last Edit: 2019-07-05, 10:18:24 AM by William S. »
Western Montana garden, glacial lake Missoula sediment lacustrian clay mollisoil sometimes with added sand in places. Zone 6A

William S.

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Re: Direct Seeded Tomato Project
« Reply #65 on: 2019-07-22, 04:47:36 AM »
It will be really interesting to see what becomes of the direct seeded halflings both in Josephs garden and my own.

If they do well and produce enough fruit it could really inform 2020's possibilities. 3/4 oz. of seed can seed my whole project. Theoretically one really awesome plant could produce that much. Though I would rather get it from ten.

Tasting may be very interesting this year.

It seems to me that I'm still a month out from ripe fruit which will confirm or deny identity. However, in my transplant garden I suspect I will get a lot more seed back than last year from the half wilds. Then next year will be able to up the proportion of the direct seeded seed that is high percentage wild a great deal.
Western Montana garden, glacial lake Missoula sediment lacustrian clay mollisoil sometimes with added sand in places. Zone 6A

William S.

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Re: Direct Seeded Tomato Project
« Reply #66 on: 2019-08-06, 05:25:21 AM »
Dry farmed direct seeded patch is generally doing great. One section with poor soil and small plants is showing signs of drying out. Have some fruit set. Lots of blooms.
Western Montana garden, glacial lake Missoula sediment lacustrian clay mollisoil sometimes with added sand in places. Zone 6A