Author Topic: Breeding short season cold climate luffa  (Read 8017 times)

Mike Crane

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Re: Breeding short season cold climate luffa
« Reply #30 on: 2021-11-03, 05:58:15 PM »
As season draws to end, first freeze is two days from now most likely. Out of the 15-20 largest luffa, 7 are from same plant and all luffa on this plant are large. Have one other plant that three large luffa on it an all luffa on it are large. It is a lighter color but the luffa started out as dark green and also has a slightly raised pattern.


These will be my primary selection for seeds next year and do plan on bagging a few flowers and manually pollinating.

Next year will also be more proactive in tagging plants with colored yard or other markings and planting a bit further apart so the jungle effect will be less. This will also make an earlier selection possible for bagging flowers and manually pollinating some crosses. I allowed other vining vegetables - mainly beans and butternut - to intermingle which was not a good idea. Had more leaf damage this year than last and believe that both some blight and insect pests came from the intermingled plants.

As have started the end of season garden cleanup have noticed what looks like some vole damage on several plants and they produced no luffa and stems have already died. Did have mole/vole problem this year s did not get the barrier around perimeter due to time spent cutting up down trees.


Jeremy Weiss

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Re: Breeding short season cold climate luffa
« Reply #31 on: 2022-02-05, 02:21:03 PM »
This may sound like and odd question, but what color are the seeds in your luffas?

I ask mainly because a recently got seed for an F1 hybrid called the apple luffa (which appears to be sort of the lemon cucumber of luffas, short and wide).  The seed is the same as a normal cylindrica in shape (smooth sides, "skirt"). But it's white/tan, instead of black. In fact, if I had enough of it (which I don't currently) I'd almost be tempted to squeeze one of the seeds to see if the seed coat is woody (like a watermelon or a "normal" luffa seed) or corky (like a pumpkin seed)

I'd think that it was someone selling under ripe seed, but BOTH of the sellers of this particular luffa show it with white seed, and I found another seller selling a different kind that is also white