Author Topic: Are Determinate Tomatoes Weaklings?  (Read 903 times)

William S.

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Re: Are Determinate Tomatoes Weaklings?
« Reply #15 on: 2019-02-07, 09:37:46 PM »
Howdy, I think at the moment I don't need more tomato germplasm myself. Joseph and Andrew have sent me quite a bit! I suspect that some of the wild species tomatoes I have now to work with have extraordinary drought tolerance. The Peruvianum complex is particularly intriguing. I'm going to try some S. Arcanum from quite dry areas.
Western Montana garden, glacial lake Missoula sediment lacustrian clay mollisoil sometimes with added sand in places. Zone 6A

Kai Duby

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Re: Are Determinate Tomatoes Weaklings?
« Reply #16 on: 2019-02-09, 09:25:42 PM »
Thanks for all the perspectives!

I've decided to do a big tomato grow out this year with dwarf and determinate varieties just to figure out my own take on the small guys. I'll be growing a small amount of ind. that, if they do well enough, I will cross with the best dwarf/det.

William S: I was excited to see the sungold f2 on your list. It's one of the ind. I'll be growing this year and I will certainly look out for all of those other varieties too! Thanks!

San Luis Valley, CO. >7,500'. Zone3-4. Low rainfall: 8-10''. Low Humidity. High winds.

S.Simonsen

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Re: Are Determinate Tomatoes Weaklings?
« Reply #17 on: 2019-02-10, 08:44:17 PM »
The only tomato I grow now is Principe Borghese. It is a determinate variety with small dense fruit suitable for drying and sauce production. I don't eat fresh tomato so it works for me. It is extremely vigorous and pest/disease resistant under my unirrigated conditions in the humid subtropics in Australia. Most other tomatoes get hammered by fruit fly, except wild pimpinellifolium. I normally grow it as a cool season crop since our frosts are minimal and the hot summer sun tends to make the fruit taste weird to me, but I have self sown bushes growing all over my garden that fruit prolifically all year around. We just had the driest January on record with basically zero rain, though the temperatures rarely got over 35 C and the soil moisture was reasonable. My soil is a heavy cracking clay that has only just started to be improved and is still pretty terrible.

I saw a genetic analysis of tomato somewhere and it turns out this variety is very basal and probably formed before tomato went through a series of genetic bottle necks when it was exported from South America, to Central America, then to Europe and again back to the USA. This matches my experience of it having exceptional vigour and productivity in comparison to any other variety. I'm also too lazy to make trellises and train my plants, so being determinate works for me as well.

One last warning- it took me buying seed of this variety from several different sources before I got the real thing, but maybe your seed sources are more dependable in the USA than tiny Australia.