Author Topic: Breeding Sweet Potatoes (turning them into a seed grown annual)  (Read 4388 times)

reed

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Re: Breeding Sweet Potatoes (turning them into a seed grown annual)
« Reply #30 on: 2019-05-19, 05:05:51 PM »
O yea, didn't think of that. Probably fine or even better for seeds to plant larger ones with old roots intact. A couple of mine had already started blooming not long after going out to the cold frame. It's been plenty warm here, hot actually in my opinion and they've been in full sun. 

Richard Watson

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Re: Breeding Sweet Potatoes (turning them into a seed grown annual)
« Reply #31 on: 2019-05-19, 06:59:29 PM »
What will be large plants come spring were cuttings 6 weeks ago, they will just chug away through winter slowly growing, so 6 months in a pot.
Changeable year round climate with warming winters - just under 500mm average yearly rainfall. 20 years of soil improvements plus sub soil top soil reversal means my garden beds are about half metre deep. Below that is 100's of metres of alluvial out wash from the Southern
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reed

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Re: Breeding Sweet Potatoes (turning them into a seed grown annual)
« Reply #32 on: 2019-05-26, 02:55:56 AM »
Well, I am officially overwhelmed by sweet potatoes. I intended to grow five of each of my own but trimmed that down to three, then two and now just one of some. Only have a couple I'm still growing five of. Still it OVER fills the intended area where I'm putting them and the new orders, about 50 total haven't even shipped yet.

I suppose if it comes to it, I'll discard some of mine or just stick them out somewhere to take their chances with the deer and rabbits. Priority this year is still getting new genetics mixed into the grex even it means some that might have been worth propagating indefinitely as clones end up going extinct. Just not possible for me to keep every one that comes along nor does that further the goal of turning them into a seed grown annual. 

Doro

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Re: Breeding Sweet Potatoes (turning them into a seed grown annual)
« Reply #33 on: 2019-05-26, 04:27:06 AM »
It's kind of heart breaking when that happens, I can relate to it very much. Same thing happened to me with the potatos, the cultivar collection has gotten too big to plant large amounts of each one. When I was done planting and had so much leftovers waiting to be planted, I just could not compost them and put a table at the roadside instead. For the neighbours to pick up all they might want. Everything gone in three days! It had a sign saying 'Free seedpotatoes, enjoy!' But I still find money in my letterbox or on the porch with thank you notes :) country life at its best.

Richard Watson

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Re: Breeding Sweet Potatoes (turning them into a seed grown annual)
« Reply #34 on: 2019-05-26, 01:12:06 PM »
That's so nice to see Doro in a world of full of 'takers'
Changeable year round climate with warming winters - just under 500mm average yearly rainfall. 20 years of soil improvements plus sub soil top soil reversal means my garden beds are about half metre deep. Below that is 100's of metres of alluvial out wash from the Southern
alps.

Doro

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Re: Breeding Sweet Potatoes (turning them into a seed grown annual)
« Reply #35 on: 2019-05-26, 03:34:35 PM »
It is really nice and I feel lucky that our small village still has a strong community feeling.

reed

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Re: Breeding Sweet Potatoes (turning them into a seed grown annual)
« Reply #36 on: 2019-05-29, 03:35:52 PM »
Well shucks! Freakish weather resulting I can only conclude, from ongoing climate change is delaying delivery of my new varieties. The grower reports a long period of cool, wet, sunless conditions has delayed sprouting of slips. It has warmed up some now with sunshine so if that holds they should start slipping, I will just get them perhaps in July instead of June. That's OK, I can work with it, barring any freakish early cool spells that is still time to flower and produce roots before frost in October. Or maybe it will be like two years ago and stay in the 90s till mid November.

My slips were somewhat delayed for the same reason but when we hit the low 90s F with hot sun they all took off. They are already planted but I didn't discard my slip roots and they continue to make more. Also have a few seed sprouted plants. If worse came to worse on the new ones I still have more than plenty to fill up my space, just wouldn't get any new genes mixed in. Heck even if they didn't come till August I bet I could still pull it off or if noting else save them as house plants till next year.
« Last Edit: 2019-05-29, 03:38:16 PM by reed »

naiku

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Re: Breeding Sweet Potatoes (turning them into a seed grown annual)
« Reply #37 on: 2019-05-30, 03:19:39 AM »
This is a pretty exciting project. Sounds like the result would be *much* easier than growing them the traditional way to me (if it isn't already). At the very least, you could just start the seeds extra early (where needed), right?

reed

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Re: Breeding Sweet Potatoes (turning them into a seed grown annual)
« Reply #38 on: 2019-05-30, 09:03:30 AM »
This is a pretty exciting project. Sounds like the result would be *much* easier than growing them the traditional way to me (if it isn't already). At the very least, you could just start the seeds extra early (where needed), right?

I'm most interested I think in the security that growing from seed provides. Of course you can always save good ones as clones but the back up seed archive makes it possible to star over in the event all the clones are lost or eaten. That's what I'v been doing so far, cloning the best ones and building the seed archive and since the best ones have also been crossing and back-crossing the % of good ones in new groups of sprouts just keeps going up. After this year I hope to keep doing that and also keep pushing the boundaries of tolerance to cold, poor growing conditions and fast maturity.

reed

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Re: Breeding Sweet Potatoes (turning them into a seed grown annual)
« Reply #39 on: 2019-06-01, 05:38:32 AM »
I was weeding off a neglected  area last night and came across a couple sweet potato volunteers. I know I lost a lot of seed last year but the main growing spot was tilled this spring and planted with regular potatoes and mulched so haven't seen any volunteers there.

I had forgotten a volunteer had grown in this other spot last year so these must have came from it. Guess then that they are second generation sweet potato weeds, not sure if I will move them over with the others or just leave them be where they are.

The bigger one looks to be probably over a week old but the other just a couple days. They look very different but pretty sure the came from the same mother plant.

I don't think this is as rare as might be commonly believed. I know of at least one other person who has found volunteer sweet potatoes in his garden. I suspect it happens now and then but folks just don't notice or mistake them for morning glories or something and rip them out.

If I get good seed production this year it would be pretty fun to just throw about a thousand of them on the ground next spring and see what happens. Eliminate heat mats, cold frames, transplanting, the whole process, and go straight to selecting for direct seeded sweet potatoes. 
« Last Edit: 2019-06-01, 05:49:59 AM by reed »

Richard Watson

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Re: Breeding Sweet Potatoes (turning them into a seed grown annual)
« Reply #40 on: 2019-06-01, 01:20:29 PM »
Sowing them like you are sowing carrots ya reckon.

The later generator has that bushy bloomer look to it.
Changeable year round climate with warming winters - just under 500mm average yearly rainfall. 20 years of soil improvements plus sub soil top soil reversal means my garden beds are about half metre deep. Below that is 100's of metres of alluvial out wash from the Southern
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reed

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Re: Breeding Sweet Potatoes (turning them into a seed grown annual)
« Reply #41 on: 2019-06-02, 04:36:15 AM »
Yep, I reckon so, just toss them on the ground and rake em in. The little one does look like bushy bloomer but the most likely mother plant looked more like the bigger one. Will be fun to see how they turn out.
I'v only got a few other seed sprouted plants this year, going for mixing new varieties with my old standby bloomers instead.
Looking forward to next year when I go back to starting lots of seeds, it's more fun that way,  not knowing what your gonna end up with.

nathanp

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Re: Breeding Sweet Potatoes (turning them into a seed grown annual)
« Reply #42 on: 2019-06-02, 08:43:13 PM »
I'm curious how much variation there is with the sweetness or sugar content of sweet potatoes in the seed grown populations you are all working with.

I haven't delved into much with sweet potatoes, partly because I do not care for the highly sweet tasting varieties I normally run into in grocery stores.  I have only grown very minimal amounts of one type of sweet potato.


reed

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Re: Breeding Sweet Potatoes (turning them into a seed grown annual)
« Reply #43 on: 2019-06-03, 03:10:43 AM »
Some are not very sweet at all. I was disappointed about that at first cause all I knew ever about sweet potatoes before is that they are supposed to be sweet and orange.  I still like those too but I'm getting adjusted to the others as well.

I thought at first they had to be orange to be sweet but that isn't the case either, some are and some not. Also white ones may or may not be. I think I still like the sweet ones best but we are learning to use the others too, almost like a regular potato in stews and such. Last year I fried some white ones with onions and they were very good, texture was a little odd, kind of dry and crumbly.


« Last Edit: 2019-06-03, 09:10:08 AM by reed »

Lauren

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Re: Breeding Sweet Potatoes (turning them into a seed grown annual)
« Reply #44 on: 2019-06-04, 09:37:13 AM »
One reason I don't normally like sweet potatoes is that they are TOO sweet. So I was happy to try one last year that wasn't. Just fried it like hash browns, and it was great.

I hadn't thought of the problem with thinking a sweet potato seedling is bindweed. I hope I'll be able to tell the difference. We've erradicated bindweed in our yard, but I still get seeds blowing in from the neighbors.