Author Topic: Breeding Sweet Potatoes (turning them into a seed grown annual)  (Read 3904 times)

reed

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Re: Breeding Sweet Potatoes (turning them into a seed grown annual)
« Reply #120 on: 2019-10-01, 01:09:36 AM »
Sounds like youve had a good year overall. Now its my turn again, looking a my clones today, putting out new leaves but no sign of flowers though.

Yep, I'm pretty pleased, the most seeds I'v ever seen.  Most excited about those from the new varieties and the two volunteers. I may post again about them when I see what kind of roots they made but officially handing the 2019 sweet potato torch off to you. 

Lauren

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Re: Breeding Sweet Potatoes (turning them into a seed grown annual)
« Reply #121 on: 2019-10-01, 09:29:20 AM »
The clump roots are great if you're planting for food. I'm keeping the commercial varieties for soil modification, so I want their roots to go down deep and spread out. :) The others will be for food once I start getting seeds.

reed

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Re: Breeding Sweet Potatoes (turning them into a seed grown annual)
« Reply #122 on: 2019-10-03, 04:08:03 AM »
I never thought about using them for soil conditioning, the variety Beauregard might be good for that, it makes what we call clunkers. Big giant things that are hard to find and harder to dig up.

I'v been thinking more about the compatibility issue with sweet potatoes. I'm gonna have to solve or at least understand that. I'v got them that make sizable roots and seed from seed in a fairly short season, not 90 days yet as is my goal but pretty close. I'v seen increase in germination in poor conditions from 4 or 5% at first to 50% or higher but the compatibility thing keeps popping up  as an issue.

I know they are not always self-incompatible as commonly believed but I also know the offspring of a self compatible parent isn't  necessarily self compatible too. I suspect and research indicates their are cases where they are cross compatible only in specific ways. This particular one with that particular one, or this one as mother but not father.

Some of course don't bloom at all, some bloom lots but don't make seeds, they worry me the most. Do they pass that on by contributing pollen to others? Heck if I know and I cant' find out with random mass crossing like I'v been doing.

Whether I like it or not and I don't, I guess I'm gonna have to do multiple controlled grow outs in isolation with all the documenting that goes with it. I hate that kind of stuff, not sure I'm up to it. One alternative is just to always keep backup of lots of seeds knowing for sure good stuff is in there even if bad stuff might also be. 
« Last Edit: 2019-10-03, 04:09:50 AM by reed »

Lauren

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Re: Breeding Sweet Potatoes (turning them into a seed grown annual)
« Reply #123 on: 2019-10-03, 06:56:36 PM »
Possibility: Once you have the other primary criteria settled (as much as possible) do a single mass planting with proven clones and take the spent blossoms off all but the plant you want to be the mother. Use clones that have proven to be your best bloomers. If no seeds by the end of the season, discard the mother.

Get rid of everything that doesn't set seed.

reed

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Re: Breeding Sweet Potatoes (turning them into a seed grown annual)
« Reply #124 on: 2019-10-13, 09:57:21 AM »
I'v started some experiments with grafting sweet potatoes on to I pandurata roots to see what happens. It's actually going better that I expected, I wrote about it on my pandurata thread. Now I'v got another goofy idea.

If you look up how to store sweet potatoes, specifically concerning temperature you might find something like this
Quote
Refrigeration changes the structure of the cell walls of sweet potatoes, making them harder to break down. As a result, refrigerated sweet potatoes can remain hard in the middle and take longer to cook. Instead, store your sweet potatoes at cool room temperature, preferably in a dark place away from light


Then there is this thing called epigenetics
Quote
the study of changes in organisms caused by modification of gene expression rather than alteration of the genetic code itself.
Other folks have mentioned this but I very little knowledge about it but maybe it can be triggered by environmental factors?

So if cold storage makes changes to cell walls, and sweet potatoes are prone to mutation anyway. I'm gonna find out what happens if a root is stored all winter in the refrigerator. Maybe it won't even sprout slips next year but if it does....

Both the pandurata grafts and this little side projects are mostly just for fun, main focus is still a reliably seed grown sweet potato.



« Last Edit: 2019-10-13, 11:45:34 AM by reed »