Author Topic: Ipomoea pandurata, aka man root, man of the earth, wild sweet potato  (Read 1704 times)

reed

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Mine out at the end of the driveway along the gravel county road are doing well. Up above the weeds and growing into some wild rose bushes, very similar to the way I see them growing wild. Hoping for some flowers this year. I dug out and discarded one in the garden for fear it would take over the world. Apparently it can grow back from little bits of root left behind. 

Never got around to trying the grafting again, but suppose it's not too late. I've got some super early blooming sweet potatoes this year and plenty of the pandurata.

Chance

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They will come back from bits of roots, very strong too.  If I could make it edible it would be a resilient food source. 

My vines, even the one I harvested most of last fall, all have flower buds already.  I may pick up some local sweet potato slips and try pollination this year.  Probably Iíll  try pruning the style of batatas and putting pandurata pollen on it before going through the trouble of grafting.

Chance

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Reed are you going to try any controlled crosses of pandurata to batatas this year?  The 2 inch pandurata root i left in the soil last year has made a very vigorous vine.

reed

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I don't know, no good reason not too as I have batatas and pandurata flowers both available right now. The big wild one down the road has lots of blooms. I thought it had died off but noticed just yesterday, mine that I started from it's seeds also have a few flowers.  I have just had lots of things going on and have kinda neglected the project. 

Chance

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You got organza bags?  Iíll send you some if you donít.  Even if you just did something like 10 pollinations, half with pruning the style first, that could at least tell us something. 
« Last Edit: 2020-07-16, 06:29:29 PM by Chance »

reed

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All righty you shamed me into it. A complication is I'm nearly positive some of my earlier flowering batatas are self pollinating. I actually kind of like that trait but makes it harder to be sure only the pandurata pollen is in play on a particular flower. I guess I have to dissect a flower before it opens?

My research on pandurata indicated that it, like batatas is also most commonly NOT self compatible. However the two plants I have collected seed from, miles apart from each other obviously are. What is your experience, thoughts on that? 

I can try the cross in the other direction too now since I don't have to drive a couple miles and crawl through the weeds to the pandurata flowers.

Chance

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Shame for science  ;D

We know itís probably not going to work so easily but your conditions are different from the Russian researcher 100 years ago especially I would think your batatas are probably more fertile at least more diverse.  Yea i guess you would have to prune the anthers before the batatas flower could self, could also bag a flower or two and see if itís self incompatible.  My experience with pandurata supports self incompatibility, my first seedling that flowered alone didnít set seed until the other seedling began flowering. 

Nicollas

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So cool !
Fingers crossed in France for your pollinations to succeed!

reed

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Last time I tried this I got 2 seeds from a batatas flower that I am somewhat confident were pollinated by pandurata. They were nicely mature and well formed but they did not sprout. All the other flowers I tried it on aborted.

I'll try a larger number of flowers this time and try to be more careful in my technique.