Author Topic: Funding Blight Resistance Breeding in Heirloom Tomatoes  (Read 1085 times)

William S.

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Re: Funding Blight Resistance Breeding in Heirloom Tomatoes
« Reply #30 on: 2019-01-09, 10:43:33 PM »
110 dwarf varieties! I wonder if any of them have late blight resistance bred in? Are they new on the OSSI list? I remember seeing just the 22 regular tomatoes.

I haven't tried any of them yet, my understanding being that they are mainly for the space limited? I'm not particularly space limited so have been growing determinates mainly because they are early. Adaptive Seeds calls Sweet Cherriette an Indeterminate Dwarf. Wonder how early they are?
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Diane Whitehead

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Re: Funding Blight Resistance Breeding in Heirloom Tomatoes
« Reply #31 on: 2019-01-09, 11:13:41 PM »
I've just bought seeds of Ferline F1 from the U.K. which is supposed to be delicious, and was blight resistant in recent trials.  I don't know how recent, as information I have about it is from 2011.

So, do I forget about buying Iron Lady and instead use Ferline, plus resistant ones I regularly grow, like Skykomish, Legend, and Chernomor?  Crossing them with a lot of the new dwarfs would be an interesting project for me.
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Carol Deppe

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Re: Funding Blight Resistance Breeding in Heirloom Tomatoes
« Reply #32 on: 2019-01-10, 04:30:22 AM »
110 dwarf varieties! I wonder if any of them have late blight resistance bred in? Are they new on the OSSI list? I remember seeing just the 22 regular tomatoes.

I haven't tried any of them yet, my understanding being that they are mainly for the space limited? I'm not particularly space limited so have been growing determinates mainly because they are early. Adaptive Seeds calls Sweet Cherriette an Indeterminate Dwarf. Wonder how early they are?
Hmmm. I see the dwarf tomatoes arent found by looking under tomatoes on the ossi seed page. You have to look under breeder, The Dwarf Tomato Project. A huge flaw that makes the dwarfs invisible. I'll mention to the person handling this aspect of the website.

There were 68 dwarf varieties. We just Pledged another 25.

Note that Patrina Nuske-Small, one co-director of the project, is in Australia, so many of these varieties are also available in Australia.

Dwarfs are compact indeterminates. That is, they are compact because they have short internodes. They have a characteristic rugose leaf texture. They usually grow 3 to 4 feet high. They are usually staked. They can be any maturity from early to late, depending on variety. Craig LeHoullier is writing a whole book about them, and about the Dwarf Tomato Project. Yes, the big advantage of the dwarves is good flavor on compact plants for people with small gardens or who grow in containers. The determinates usually don't have prime flavor, apparently because the leaf to fruit ratio isnt high enough. Dwarfs can give you compact plants with true heirloom quality flavor.

The Dwarf Tomato Project got its start through gardeners interacting on a tomato forum, by the way.

A number of Ossi Partner Seed Companies carry some of these dwarves. But Victory Seeds has by far the largest collection. I believe all but 9 or so that will be introduced next year. And Victory has a whole subsection in their on line catalog just for dwarf tomatoes, so they are easy to find.


As far as I know, none of the dwarf tomatoes have any late blight resistance. So it would be very helpful if we started crossing them appropriately.


« Last Edit: 2019-01-10, 04:50:07 AM by Carol Deppe »

William S.

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Re: Funding Blight Resistance Breeding in Heirloom Tomatoes
« Reply #33 on: 2019-01-10, 01:17:39 PM »
One thing I don't quite know how to do is work the back cross without the genetic testing OR the presence of blight.

My thought instead is just grow out the F2 of the straight cross, properly dry the seed and freeze it until the blight shows up. Or mail some of it to a blight stricken friend who agrees to send back seed from healthy plants.

I am also wondering how to incorporate the blight resistance into my previous plans. Like I want to cross Coyote and Sweet Cherriette. Instead I could perhaps cross both with Iron Lady and cross the F1s with each other to produce an F2 population that had some of all three.
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Andrew Barney

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Re: Funding Blight Resistance Breeding in Heirloom Tomatoes
« Reply #34 on: 2019-01-10, 08:04:42 PM »
There is a very interesting thread on Tomatoville,    'Mountain Gem' F1 hybrid tomato,  started by RandyG,   Dr. Randy Gardner
from North Carolina, who bred a lot of the tomatoes with "mountain" in their names.

I'm ordering these two right now based on flavor!! The podcast interview was amazing!! Modern resistance + heirloom flavor!

https://www.talkingbiotechpodcast.com/024-biotech-tomato-breeding-social-media-on-the-farm/

http://old-hos.ifas.ufl.edu/kleeweb/newcultivars.html

https://m.facebook.com/Garden-Gem-Tomatoes-574251062717213/

Quote
? As of today, they are still not commercially available. But we want you to try them out. So here’s the deal. If you will donate $10 to support new variety development, we’ll send you packets with 15 seeds each of Garden Treasure, Garden Gem and our newest variety that we call our "W" hybrid. The W Hybrid has been shown to have a much higher than normal lycopene content.

EDIT: oh, these might be different than the 'Mountain Gem' above.  I guess I saw the word "gem" and thought they were the same.
« Last Edit: 2019-01-10, 08:08:20 PM by Andrew Barney »