Author Topic: Welcome and Introduce Yourself!  (Read 4282 times)

Richard Watson

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Re: Welcome and Introduce Yourself!
« Reply #60 on: 2019-03-07, 12:20:29 PM »
This is my spring sown block for seed next summer, as you can see they are very even now, though I did pull a couple of bolters which ive not had for many years.

I will have to start a thread on this new line of leek that I sell as Portage.

Changeable year round climate with warming winters - just under 500mm average yearly rainfall. 20 years of soil improvements plus sub soil top soil reversal means my garden beds are about half metre deep. Below that is 100's of metres of alluvial out wash from the Southern
alps.

reed

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Re: Welcome and Introduce Yourself!
« Reply #61 on: 2019-03-07, 01:20:46 PM »
Glad to see Zach joined up here! Look forward to the new threads on onions and garlic.

Kazedwards

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Re: Welcome and Introduce Yourself!
« Reply #62 on: 2019-03-12, 05:22:24 PM »
Thank you all for the welcome. Glad to be here too!

galina

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Re: Welcome and Introduce Yourself!
« Reply #63 on: 2019-03-18, 03:18:04 AM »
Hi everybody! I must have registered some time ago but never read much on here or introduced myself as I am not selling new varieties under OSSI.  They are more for sharing among family and friends.

I garden in central England.  Cool and not quite maritime, but not continental climate either.  Usually very cloudy, but little rain.  In latter years the weather has been very confused indeed.  Last year we had a very cold spring, followed by a heatwave summer with very good outdoor tomatoes and no blight.  Who knows what this year will bring.  Our weather has turned very unpredictable.  Soil is slightly alkaline, heavy clay. 

Carol Deppe got me started on veg breeding, like she has so many others.  My first ever new vegetable was a very large yellow mangetout pea (snow) from Golden Sweet and Schweizer Riesen, which has in turn become the source of a nice yellow snap, crossed with Amish Snap.  I managed to get the mangetout even larger by a further cross to a very long green mangetout and the snap bigger too, but both these are not yet fully stable.  Not so successful were several breeding lines for a large, red mangetout.  I have a good red shelling pea, but mostly red blotchy mangetouts. 

More casually I follow up several random crosses in lettuce, beans and perennial brassica.  Following a gift of excellent breeding lines of blight resistant potatoes from tps, I have become interested in tps potato growing too and currently my garden struggles to fit it all in.  Yet more and more observation and breeding opportunities present themselves and they are all fascinating. 

Nice to see so many familiar names on here.  I have a lot of reading and catching up to do.
Central England, cool, maritime (ish), cloudy, often dry, but recent weather unpredictable

Natasha Flue

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Re: Welcome and Introduce Yourself!
« Reply #64 on: 2019-03-27, 06:30:51 PM »
Hi, I'm Natasha and I'm currently living in the northeast and growing on my parents' farm in PA on about an acre this year (1/3 grain, 1/3 vegetable, 1/3 cover crop). This is a big jump up in size but it's on a wide spacing so I can use the cultivators and such that they have. I've been seed saving for a couple of years now and as I've grown more crops and started tailoring my vegetable growing to what I like to eat, I've figured out that there isn't varieties available for what I want. I also just think it is really fun to seed save and breeding looks fun too and I wanted to give it a go.

This will be my first year doing plant breeding crosses with my two breeding projects being paste tomatoes and grain sorghum.

Right now I actually work as a technician in extension, so I get all the learning of visiting farms, doing trials and listening to extension folks without any of the stress. It's awesome and there's so much out there to learn.

Raymondo

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Re: Welcome and Introduce Yourself!
« Reply #65 on: 2019-03-28, 02:21:28 PM »
Grain sorghum would be interesting Natasha. I look forward to hearing more about it as time goes by.
Ray
Mildly acidic clay loam over clay and ironstone; temperate climate modified by altitude (1000m); avg rainfall 780mm; usually wet summers and dry winters.

esoteric_agriculture

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Re: Welcome and Introduce Yourself!
« Reply #66 on: 2019-04-05, 08:33:50 PM »
Hi! I recognize most of you from various forums I spend far more time lurking on than posting on. I live in Southern Pennsylvania and both my wife and I both have decades of experience in ornamental Horticulture. Iíve been saving seeds and trying amateur plant breeding for about 25-30 years now. Most of my efforts prior to 10 years ago focused on ornamentals. 10 years ago we moved to the small hobby farm/homestead we have now, about 4 acres, split between orchard, pasture, vegetables, ornamentals and lawn. Most years I have about 1/4 acre in food gardens, which gave me the space to start to be able to think about breeding things like corn and squash. Like many of you, I was heavily influenced by all of Carol Deppeís books, and by Joseph Lofthouseís modern Landrace ideas. Iíve been working on  various landrace squash for 7-8 years , various segregating lines of common beans for 4-6 years, segregating lines of Sorghum for 3-5 years, ornamental eggplant for 12 years, and this will be my 3rd or 4th year intentionality crossing corn. Iím also working with crossing various annual and perennial species of sunflower, with some initial success. Iíve been trying to breed Vernonia, Coreopsis, and Solidago, but so far have only been successful with Vernonia. I hope to make tomato and pepper crosses for the first time successfully this year. I am growing out a very large number of TPS seedlings this year, but not actually breeding potatoes yet. Iím very interested in Apples, Willows, Oaks, Cannas, currently. Iím breeding Cannas as well, and have bred in the past lillies, daylillies, hostas, begonias, chrysanthemums, iris, maybe more. I am very hopeful that in the near future Iíll have some stabilized/finished varieties to make available. Iíd love for there to be more plant breeding taking place in my local area. 😁
Very deep mildly acidic clay loam with abundant sandstone and quartzite gravel and stones. Very high water table, Border of Koppen climate Oceanic and Humid Subtropical, USDA Zone 6b, very windy frost pocket valley at the foot of a lonely mountain, historic dairy and orchard county.

spacecase0

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Re: Welcome and Introduce Yourself!
« Reply #67 on: 2019-04-08, 10:03:48 AM »
hi,
I use the same username on all the web forums, so some of you may remember me from other forums.

have been gardening for the last 37 years
I got fascinated with plant breeding in about 1994~1997 when I lived in a city.
for the last 7 years I have the land to actually really do something about it.
my current goal is to open a garden seed company, mostly to distribute what I have done, giving the seeds away is just not working well enough. but I do really need about $200 a month income from something, so hopefully it can be from seeds so that I can focus on them more.
have been breeding standard vegetables to deal with the american southwest climate that is at some elevation. specifically cool nights, hot dry days, and native soil that is either clay or decomposed granite
already done this for zucchini, watermelon, cherry tomatoes, and southern peas. still working on the others.
I also strive to have the garden off grid, still working on that. I can dry farm grain crops in the winter, so that part is off grid entierly.
previous jobs were electrical engineering and computer systems administrator.
my extra goal this year is to have the garden automated enough to at least water itself.

whwoz

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Re: Welcome and Introduce Yourself!
« Reply #68 on: 2019-06-25, 12:24:12 AM »
Gidday, I go by the handle of Whwoz on a number of forums where I have crossed paths with some of you in the past.   My name is Warren Simpson and I garden roughly an hour and a half drive east of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.  I have been associated with the land all of my life, having been born on a multi-generational family orchard with my mothers side hailing from the Market Garden scene. 

I have a big interest in all plants native plus I enjoy growing vegetables a lot and I am starting to get interested in breeding them having seen what can be achieved through the web.  Main focus is one or two lines of squash, trying to get sweet potatoes to flower where we are, playing around with tomatoes and starting to look at peas.  Fruit trees of course are a big interest also.

Richard Watson

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Re: Welcome and Introduce Yourself!
« Reply #69 on: 2019-06-25, 01:10:13 PM »
Hi Warren, Sounds like many of the fruit trees must be a good age by now
Changeable year round climate with warming winters - just under 500mm average yearly rainfall. 20 years of soil improvements plus sub soil top soil reversal means my garden beds are about half metre deep. Below that is 100's of metres of alluvial out wash from the Southern
alps.

Zach E.

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Re: Welcome and Introduce Yourself!
« Reply #70 on: 2019-06-25, 10:20:31 PM »
Hi everyone, my name is Zach and I am growing in southeastern Pennsylvania, zone 6b. I live with my girlfriend and a couple other folks, about a mile and a half away from the Susquehanna River. Our geology and soils here are diverse, ranging from some of the finest soils in the world (chester loam from weathered micaceus schists) to some of the worst (serpentine).

I found my way into plant breeding after years of joyful learning, playing, and working with plants of all kinds. Growing up my mother kept a garden as did my elderly relatives in the Appalachians, and so I came to value that way of life from an early age, although I didn't come into practice until more recently. In years prior I have traveled across North America learning native plants and ecosystems along the way. Learned horticulture and farming through a few mentors and other experiences.

With interests in foraging, permaculture, agroforestry, ethnobotany, and native plants, I've fallen into a interesting intersectional niche where the boundaries of what I consider a garden have been extended and blurred at the same time, and sometimes altogether removed. One of my biggest focuses has been the cultivation of native indigenous root plants for food and medicine, often in a undomesticated setting. It was only natural that I would find myself drawn toward the landrace philosophy of Joseph Lofthouse, because the attitude of landrace gardening is more loose with the rules and accomodating of difference, much like nature Herself.

My favorite things to grow are roots of all sorts, although I also enjoy growing leafy greens, herbs for tea, and non-root staples like sunflowers, squashes, corn, etc. Additionally I save seed of native plants which I reintroduce into places -- guerilla restoration? -- and also grow out nursery-style. I also started a tree nursery this spring for native fruit and nut trees...

As a breeder my concern is less about improvement and more about genetic diversity, adaptability, and increased hardiness. Some of my pet projects include the creation and maintenance of populations of rare or threatened species.

Looking forward to more conversations, learning, and sharing!

whwoz

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Re: Welcome and Introduce Yourself!
« Reply #71 on: 2019-06-26, 06:27:42 AM »
Hi Warren, Sounds like many of the fruit trees must be a good age by now

Richard, Unfortunately not.  The Orchard was established by Dad's Grandfather around the 1880's if I recall correctly, had undergone a series of topworks or tree replacements as variety preferences changed and was compulsory acquired in the early 1970's by the state government for what is now the Eastlink freeway, been gone for 45 years.

Rebsie Fairholm

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Re: Welcome and Introduce Yourself!
« Reply #72 on: 2019-08-13, 06:01:38 AM »
Hello everyone, I'm Rebsie Fairholm. Some of you already know me from my Daughter of the Soil blog, or from the early days of the Homegrown Goodness forum. I've not been very active in recent years due to life getting in the way, but I'm still here, breeding mostly peas in my small back garden in south-west England.

I'm a musician, gardener, photographer and graphic designer. The graphic design provides just enough income to allow me to do the other three things. My background is in publishing; I worked as a designer and editor for a large British publisher for many years, and now I have my own very very small publishing venture which just about pays the bills but only because I do all the work myself. Working from home is the blessing which enables me to take care of the garden. Music is also taking off again after a long hiatus and I recently played my first gig in 12 years.

I've been a Daughter of the Soil from the earliest age: my mum hoped I would be a dainty, feminine little girl but all I wanted to do was play in the mud. I'm a self-taught gardener and I got into heritage vegetables around 2005, when I finally had a garden with enough space to collect and experiment. I'm very drawn to historic varieties, just because I love the idea of growing the same varieties my ancestors did. But it soon became apparent that these old varieties were endangered and disappearing, and I needed to encourage others to grow and save seeds from them. And so I began my blog in 2006.

In 2005 when my family were pestering me about what I wanted for Christmas, I went browsing for books to stick on my wish list. I came across Carol Deppe's book and thought "that looks vaguely interesting" and put it on the list without a second thought. It was duly bought for me, and I didn't bother to look at it for another six months, but when I did Ė my goodness, what a revelation! It was June and I had some heritage peas growing in the garden so I just had to rush straight outside with a scalpel and get pollinating. What makes Carol's book special, of course, is that it makes a very complicated subject totally accessible to someone like me, while also being very inspiring in a spiritual kind of way Ė it just joined up all the dots for me. It not only taught me everything I know about plant breeding, it also made, for me, a crucial link with the work I was doing with heritage vegetables. I understood for the first time that the survival of these varieties is not all about trying to preserve them in their historic forms (which is impossible anyway) but about reusing their genetics in new combinations. And what a vital role the amateur gardener plays in that process. That revelation has stood me in very good stead, because the best results I've had have come from crossing old, rare, historic and non-commercial varieties.

My most exciting result, as many of you know, was the totally accidental creation of red-podded peas, in 2008. I was trying to breed a purple mangetout (snow) pea. (I still am.) It has given me a few years of frustration, but in 2019 I've been blessed with a spectacularly beautiful scarlet-red mangetout, which actually tastes good! Hurrah! All I have to do now is spend a few years stabilising it. Plant breeding is a hobby for the incredibly patient.
Daughter of the Soil : suburban garden, south-west England

triffid

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Re: Welcome and Introduce Yourself!
« Reply #73 on: 2019-08-13, 09:44:23 AM »
Welcome, Rebsie!

I can't remember how I first discovered your blog but it ultimately led me down the rabbit hole of amateur plant breeding and pea obsession. And now here we are.

Very glad to hear of the recent good fortune in music & mangetout. Happy gardening!

galina

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Re: Welcome and Introduce Yourself!
« Reply #74 on: 2019-08-14, 02:04:05 AM »
Welcome Rebsie to this forum.  Glad you found the time and opportunity for more pea breeding and that you had a breakthrough purple mangetout and red also.

We have been wondering whether you were still keeping your early breeding successes alive or whether your life had taken an entirely new direction.  Very happy to hear that not only did you keep your breeding going, but that you also added to the novel varieties.

Good to see you posting again and Welcome to OSSI!
Central England, cool, maritime (ish), cloudy, often dry, but recent weather unpredictable