Author Topic: Welcome and Introduce Yourself!  (Read 9139 times)

SeanInVa

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Re: Welcome and Introduce Yourself!
« Reply #90 on: 2020-03-07, 05:51:56 PM »
Welcome! What is a micro tomato? Small in fruit or small in plant? I've noticed some of the ultra early tomatoes I've grown have quite small plants.

They are typically plants that are only about 6"-12" in height, sometimes up to 18". They mostly produce cherry-sized fruit - but we're working on that. Red Robin is a pretty popular commercially available micro.

Steph S

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Re: Welcome and Introduce Yourself!
« Reply #91 on: 2020-03-08, 11:01:21 AM »
Welcome, Sean!
I'm a great admirer of Dan Follett's projects with the micros.   Kudos for helping him out.  8)   You have loads of supporters at TomatoJunction  as well.
This is a fantastic forum here for breeders, and I am really enjoying it, glad to have you onboard.  :)

William S.

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Re: Welcome and Introduce Yourself!
« Reply #92 on: 2020-03-08, 11:45:35 AM »
Started a micro tomato thread just to carry on the tomato portion of this conversation.
Western Montana garden, glacial lake Missoula sediment lacustrian silty clay mollisoil sometimes with added sand in places. Zone 6A with 100 to 130 frost free days

Chance

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Re: Welcome and Introduce Yourself!
« Reply #93 on: 2020-04-26, 04:40:29 PM »
Hi !

My name is Taylor.  My climate is mid Atlantic US, blue ridge mountains zone 7a.  My work with plants has been interrupted a lot the last several years through moving several times and getting a degree.  My plant breeding inspiration started from reading Ivan Michurin and Carol Deppe, then later from Joseph Lofthouse and others. 

The past couple years my focus has been with Passiflora and Dioscorea.  Im now building up stock to starting wide crosses in Polygonatum, working toward tall vigorous plants with large rhizomes as a staple crop and longevity food.  Landrace style projects veg that I hope to try are leeks, artichokes, and Josephs promiscuous tomatoes and maximos squash.

One of my interests is graft induced variation.  Im working toward a couple projects, but these are tricky and take some set up to do properly. 

Although food security was the main reason I started selecting plants, connecting with breeders from all over has been really cool, and seeing the stories behind the plants continue to evolve.   


Kim K.

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Re: Welcome and Introduce Yourself!
« Reply #94 on: 2020-04-27, 04:23:19 AM »
Welcome, Chance! The mid-Atlantic mountains are a beautiful region. Do you ever trial varieties for Southern Exposure? Their seed catalog is so enticing, but I find that even though I'm technically in the same zone (7a), their varieties usually need more heat than I can give them in New England.
Gardening in rocky, slightly acidic sandy loam on the southern New England coast. Zone 7a, with wicked freeze/thaw cycles all winter. 44" of precipitation spread evenly throughout the year.

Garrett Schantz

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Re: Welcome and Introduce Yourself!
« Reply #95 on: 2020-04-27, 11:41:40 PM »
Hello everyone

My name is Garrett.

Live in zone 6a Pennsylvania, obtained Tetsukabuto squash seeds along with a few other squash to try and cross some characteristics over. Mostly got the idea from reading on forums such as these. Also interested in crossing different species of tomatoes. Haven't really manually / intentionally crossed tomatoes many times before, but should be doable. Have crossed peppers quite a few times though, just for fun. Don't really have many of the wild species though(Promiscuous flowered types might help cross for me I hope).
  Also obtained a few legume species this year and will try to get them to germinate: Prairie Turnip (Pediomelum Esculentum)Tuberous pea (Lathyrus tuberosus). Only the roots are edible for those.
Bought some runner beans(Phaseolus coccineus)- white flowered variety, Wild Kidney Bean(Phaseolus polystachios) Trailing Wild Bean(Strophostyles helvula). Also Horse Gram(Macrotyloma uniflorum) Asparagus Pea(Tetragonolobus purpureus) Winged Bean(Psophocarpus tetragonolobus) Siberian Peashrub(Caragana arborescens). Also a few Vigna species, along with three Canavalia species, probably missing a few here. Most everything I listed(Saved a few runner bean seed last year, only about two or three pods worth, along with some other beans) will be something that I am trialing out this year, so I can't offer seed to trade just yet, some of these may not even germinate. Some of these are oddities, that probably won't grow well for me either. But I will try getting some to eventually adapt to my area, if all goes well maybe I will attempt crossing Phaseolus species...

 These types forums also brought to my attention: The "Tomato brown rugose fruit virus", which seems nasty and may end up in the U.S. from imported seed, so try and remember to get seed from good sources and have them screened for it, the USDA will decimate all of your seed crops and land around you to ensure it doesn't spread.

Then here is something I found while reading on my own: "Fire Blight", a disease mostly effecting apples and pears, along with other species of plants such as Crataegus genus types. Fire blight seems to be popping up more and more in AG articles each year, due to its continuous spread - which could be a disaster for certain cultivars of apples in the future. The main reason it seems to be spreading is due to "new" cultivars being able to be spaced closely together than ever before, along with the fact that cultivars are clones. Clones in which are being grown in large groups in small spaces. They are all genetically the same plant, so the blight spreads quite well with these mixed conditions, quickly hopping to basically the same plant/tree. The blight spreads by wind, which means that other orchards can be infected quite easily as well. Most current fruit cultivars, should be hybridized for a fresh set of genes, in my opinion and most of the popular cultivars, are becoming aged. Improved varieties are popping up, but not in large enough numbers. I would rather not have apples or other fruit fall into the direction that Figs and Bananas are going, due to pests and disease - having no resistance to them. Not sure if there are any fruit tree breeders on here, as it takes quite a long time without grafts or clones.

Anyways, nice to meet you all, will post whatever I get to grow somewhere on here!


Ferdzy

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Re: Welcome and Introduce Yourself!
« Reply #96 on: 2020-04-28, 06:59:24 AM »
Welcome Garrett. Some interesting projects on the go there, looking forward to hearing how they go.

Adrian

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Re: Welcome and Introduce Yourself!
« Reply #97 on: 2020-06-12, 10:16:22 AM »
Hello,
 my name is Adrian.
I am very interested by the genetic. I would like learn all in the plants.
I grow squash, peas, beans, cowpea, lentil and tomato.
I try to make a few crossbreeding with the squashs! And i experiment the interspecific crossbreading.
Skills: electricity and mechanic.
Climate: 1/2 continental. A climate globaly sweet in inter season but a risk of heatwave (35C the summer and heatcold (_10C) the winter

« Last Edit: 2020-06-12, 10:30:48 AM by Adrian »