Author Topic: Welcome and Introduce Yourself!  (Read 4285 times)

Chiu-Ki Chan

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Re: Welcome and Introduce Yourself!
« Reply #45 on: 2019-01-15, 11:03:30 AM »
Hello Chiu-Ki. I'm the cheerfully greedy Chair of the OSSI Variety Review Committee. OSSI doesn't have any luffas....  ;)

Hi Carol! I'm very new to plant breeding and I'm getting a headache reading all the legal ramifications. If I want to breed for OSSI, do I need to trace the legal status of each of the parent plants?

I got my first packet of luffa from Amazon and it was shipped from China. There isn't any mention of patents or anything like that (it's in Chinese but I read Chinese). I also have a packet of seed that I bought in Japan (which was produced in China) plus a packet from Botanical Interest.

Am I in the clear to use these seeds to breed for OSSI?

Carol Deppe

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Re: Welcome and Introduce Yourself!
« Reply #46 on: 2019-01-15, 02:11:54 PM »
Hi Carol! I'm very new to plant breeding and I'm getting a headache reading all the legal ramifications. If I want to breed for OSSI, do I need to trace the legal status of each of the parent plants?

I got my first packet of luffa from Amazon and it was shipped from China. There isn't any mention of patents or anything like that (it's in Chinese but I read Chinese). I also have a packet of seed that I bought in Japan (which was produced in China) plus a packet from Botanical Interest.

Am I in the clear to use these seeds to breed for OSSI?

The Designation Agreement you sign as part of the application to Pledge a variety includes language to the effect that none of the germplasm used has any patents or restrictions on it that would preclude Pledging it to the best of your knowledge.

Actually, it can be impossible to tell if something is patented. Even an expensive professional patent search wouldn't tell us for sure, because seed companies often use only in-house breeding line numbers in their patents, not the names they use in selling the varieties. This ought to be illegal, because in theory you reveal the secret of the invention in exchange for the legal protection of the patent. And by identifying the variety only by meaningless numbers instead of the public names, the company gets the legal protection without revealing the secret. It's a practice I hope OSSI will be able to challenge some day.

Meanwhile, we do the best we can. As a breeder, I figure if they didnt tell me it was patented or restricted, I'll assume it isn't. This means I might accidently develop a variety from patented germplasm and Pledge it, and the variety might get a cease and desist order from someone. In which case its ossi status would have to be annulled. This hasnt happened so far.

We did have a breeder try to Pledge a variety that included unreleased germplasm from a university program that was used without permission. I checked things out with the university breeder, and OSSI did not accept the variety.

PVP varieties are legal to breed from in most cases. There are exceptions.
« Last Edit: 2019-01-15, 02:20:43 PM by Carol Deppe »

Ocimum

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Re: Welcome and Introduce Yourself!
« Reply #47 on: 2019-01-16, 07:40:39 AM »
... If I want to breed for OSSI, ...
 luffa ...

Hi and welcome Chui-Ki Chan,

I am also interested in Luffa for short season/cold climate. I managed to produce them only once, and this in a greenhouse.

If you are interested you can work publicly with the experimental farm network.
https://www.experimentalfarmnetwork.org/
You can pledge the seeds OSSI, and exchange them with other breeders.

Best

Chiu-Ki Chan

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Re: Welcome and Introduce Yourself!
« Reply #48 on: 2019-01-16, 10:15:52 AM »
The Designation Agreement you sign as part of the application to Pledge a variety includes language to the effect that none of the germplasm used has any patents or restrictions on it that would preclude Pledging it to the best of your knowledge.

That's good to know! Makes me much more comfortable with breeding for OSSI.

Hi and welcome Chiu-Ki Chan,

I am also interested in Luffa for short season/cold climate. I managed to produce them only once, and this in a greenhouse.

If you are interested you can work publicly with the experimental farm network.
https://www.experimentalfarmnetwork.org/
You can pledge the seeds OSSI, and exchange them with other breeders.

Best

Hi Ocimum! Yes I would love to work with you and others to breed short season cold climate luffa.

Thanks for letting me know about experimental farm network. I don't think I have enough clarity to create a project there yet, but I made a thread here to get started: http://opensourceplantbreeding.org/forum/index.php?topic=122.0

gmuller

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Re: Welcome and Introduce Yourself!
« Reply #49 on: 2019-01-17, 05:07:25 PM »
Hi.
Finally got around to posting.
I'm Templeton elsewhere.
Growing in Bendigo, Victoria, S.E. Australia. Dry, skeletal sedimentary soils on a low hillside in the suburbs.  Maybe 30 sq metres of garden beds. Teach natural history at university, soon to finish, which will give me more time for my projects.
OSSI pledged coloured snow peas developed over the last 8 years or so.
Working on:
mass crossed perennial leek, Mass crossed beetroot, Potato onion selections, Short fat parsnip, Coloured baby carrots, Single serve musk melons with flavour, finalising a Jaune Flammee Dwarf tomato project, selecting lettuces from many of Morton's mixes.

My main drivers are fun and curiosity, and developing some diverse gene pools in backyard vegetables for others to play with.
I need more land and water, so  I can have a garden I can eat from, rather than leaving everything to seed. And more room for some proper growouts.
Greg.

gratefulseedsaver

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Re: Welcome and Introduce Yourself!
« Reply #50 on: 2019-01-18, 06:40:45 AM »
My name is a Mike and Ilive in Omaha, Nebraska (zone 5b). I own/operate a vegan/organic seed production/market produce urban farm. I enjoy breeding tomatoes, peppers, corn and beans. Iím currently working on an orange grape tomato (f5) and a black plum tomato (f5). Flavor and shelf life are my hopes. The exploitation of seed being patented has  me down this path. I still donít understand how State Universities are being allowed to patent seed/plants when public funds go to help the operation of those institutions, but the public sees no royalties from these Universities. Seeds have no business being handled this way nor do I believe that they were put into place for this type of usage. Exclusivities (patents) are for the greedy plain and simple. If you desire notoriety in or when helping mankind then your real interest lies in helping yourself and you should state just that as your intention. Itís pretty obvious behind the scenes...just take a look for yourself. Seeds are meant to feed people, not greed!!!
"Itís Not What You Look At That Matters, Itís What You See...Freedom Disappears Under The Dominance Of A Bad Habit...It Is Not The Land That Is Broken, But Our Relationship To Land"

gmuller

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Re: Welcome and Introduce Yourself!
« Reply #51 on: 2019-01-21, 02:00:42 AM »
Hi @gratefulseedsaver, for tomatoe shelf life, have you looked at the qualities of the Italian storage tomatoes, like Piennolo del Vesuvio? last 6 months on picked trusses.
G

gratefulseedsaver

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Re: Welcome and Introduce Yourself!
« Reply #52 on: 2019-01-21, 05:50:37 AM »
No I havenít looked into the Italian varieties that you mentioned. Iím not really looking for Ďstorageí length per se. Iím working more for the Ďmarketí consumer kitchen counter shelf life. Iím getting just about a month off of the vine with the two varieties that Iím working on now. I want the shelf life to coincide with their trips to the market, so to speak. Thank You for the information, though. Iíll look into the variety that you mentioned. Thanks again, G!!! Positive Vibrations...Mike
"Itís Not What You Look At That Matters, Itís What You See...Freedom Disappears Under The Dominance Of A Bad Habit...It Is Not The Land That Is Broken, But Our Relationship To Land"

Kazedwards

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Re: Welcome and Introduce Yourself!
« Reply #53 on: 2019-03-06, 11:03:26 PM »
Hello everyone! My name is Zach Edwards and I am Kazedwards on other forums such as homegrown goodness, tomatoville and backyard chickens. My wife, 1yo daughter and I live just outside of Liberty, Mo which is near Kansas City in zone 6. We have 3.5 acres that we moved to in September of 2017. Our property has a gentle slope towards the north and east that runs about the whole squarish lot. It has no mature trees and Iím pretty sure was just cow pasture before our very small neighborhood came. Itís a blank slate for us to grow into.

The top soil is fantastic at about a foot deep and very dark. After that I start hitting hard clay. I started gardening in 2013 in a small suburban lot. It was basically fill dirt that leveled the area and full of rock and pure clay. Very hard to work with. The last 2 years I havenít had a garden due to moving and becoming a dad. I have a small 10 x 10ish area that I have my garlic in and thatís about it. Last year we also got 8 chickens all of which are hens and starting to lay well. This year Iím getting back into gardening and very excited.

I am a hobby gardener and passionate seed saver that is still learning so much. I am not a plant breeder by any means. The somewhat breeding project I have going is garlic. I have been lucky enough to have my garlic produce true seed. I say lucky enough because it was pure luck. I havenít done anything but planted some clearance Chesnok Red garlic late, notice abundant flowers and then remove bulbils. Actually the only reason I had the flowers was because of laziness that year. I had just started gardening and happened upon homegrown goodness while looking for info on a top setting onion. From there I found the tread on true garlic seed. It then became a project that really have gotten into. I got true seed my first year (2014) and managed to get some to grow. Most didnít make it but one did. My Chesnok Red also produces seed in 2015 and 2016. I got one to grow from the 2015 seed harvest. They have since grown to full but small bulbs that have been divided and replanted and are still growing in my small patch. The 2016 seed harvest of over 1000 seeds was winter sown this year. In January 2017 I planted all of my garlic stock at the new place while our house was being built and we lived in an apartment. It was harvested late and replanted once we moved in a new bed closer to the house. I wasnít able to dig it last year but seems to have done just fine so far. This spring will really tell me how much has made it but I suspect it is doing just fine.

My plans this year is to get a garden actually going. Last year I had the same plan and started about 30 tomatoes but was busy building our chicken coop and didnít get a garden started. I still need to expand the small run and as of now I plan going no till and doing raised rows. I can get free wood mulch for the paths and will use straw for mulching the beds. Iím not sure of the exact layout or size but I figure that will come as I go. I also have some raspberries and a peach tree on the way but only have a vague idea of where those will go. I hope to add blueberries, a few grapes and a small 10-12 tree orchard as time passes. I would really like to put in an espalier fence of sorts around the main garden area using apple trees. I think that last one is a ways down the road but still a worthy goal to keep in mind now. This last fall I planted various trees I ordered from Arbor Day around the house and property lines. Trees are one thing I am really envious of at our new home. You really donít realize the value of mature trees until you live on top of a hill with none through a cold windy winter. Other things I enjoy growing most are of course garlic, walking onions, tomatoes, carrots, sunflowers and kohlrabi. Kohlrabi Iím still getting the hang of as well as most other cole crops and various other things. I plan on experimenting with some cover crops this year too. I am also starting to learn about canning and other ways to preserve food. Other things on my list are landscape plantings around the property.

Thank you Richard for letting me know about this forum. Iím glad to see a lot of familiar names. I look forward to learning more from everyone!

Richard Watson

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Re: Welcome and Introduce Yourself!
« Reply #54 on: 2019-03-07, 01:10:42 AM »
Great to see you here Zach
Changeable year round climate with warming winters - just under 500mm average yearly rainfall. 20 years of soil improvements plus sub soil top soil reversal means my garden beds are about half metre deep. Below that is 100's of metres of alluvial out wash from the Southern
alps.

Ferdzy

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Re: Welcome and Introduce Yourself!
« Reply #55 on: 2019-03-07, 07:49:58 AM »
Nice to see you here and congratulations on the whole slew of exciting life changes.

Ferdzy

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Re: Welcome and Introduce Yourself!
« Reply #56 on: 2019-03-07, 08:39:17 AM »
Huh, just read through and realized I have not introduced myself here.

My name is Jennifer (Ferdzy was a childhood nick-name that I hated at the time but when I needed an internet persona I decided that now that I'm older I like it just fine. You will find my little footieprints all over the internet by that name, as unlike Jennifer it seems to be very rare if not unique.)

I garden with my partner of 30 years in Meaford, Ontario. We've had this garden for 10 years now. Our garden is about 2 kilometers from Georgian Bay, just starting up the sheltering rise of the Niagara escarpment. This means we tend to get better winters than people both further north AND further south although often with plentiful snow. The summers on the other hand usually have a dry period of anywhere from 3 weeks (best in 10 years) to 6 months (worst in 10 years). Since our soil is poor, sandy and acidic we need to irrigate as everything dries out very fast. We've had summers where it has never gotten much above 20įC and summers when it has rarely gotten much below 30įC. Most are somewhere in between. Our garden is quite large and we are in fact scaling it back a bit as it has become clear that we have bitten off more than we can chew. It will still be large, though.

Mr. Ferdzy (he really does not like his real name put on the intertubes) and I quickly got interested in seed-saving after we started gardening and letting things cross/crossing things on purpose followed close behind. We are playing around with watermelons, beans, peas, leeks, onions, shallots, potatoes, as well as a lot of other things that we are just letting run together and see what happens. Brassicas in particular seem to improve enormously in our garden when we use our own saved seed, as our soil is really marginal for them. Our attempt at saving cauliflower seed last summer failed, though, because we now seem to have swede midge (%@#$!)

You can list us as another pair who have been much influenced by Carol Deppe, although we were already well-ensconced at Homegrown Goodness when her book on vegetable breeding came out.

Andrew Barney

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Re: Welcome and Introduce Yourself!
« Reply #57 on: 2019-03-07, 09:40:32 AM »
I have been lucky enough to have my garlic produce true seed. I say lucky enough because it was pure luck. I havenít done anything but planted some clearance Chesnok Red garlic late, notice abundant flowers and then remove bulbils. Actually the only reason I had the flowers was because of laziness that year. I had just started gardening and happened upon homegrown goodness while looking for info on a top setting onion. From there I found the tread on true garlic seed. It then became a project that really have gotten into. I got true seed my first year (2014) and managed to get some to grow. Most didnít make it but one did. My Chesnok Red also produces seed in 2015 and 2016. I got one to grow from the 2015 seed harvest. They have since grown to full but small bulbs that have been divided and replanted and are still growing in my small patch. The 2016 seed harvest of over 1000 seeds was winter sown this year.

Hey! Good to see you!

While i'm not currently growing garlic I am highly interested in the true garlic and onion seed projects. Feel free to start a thread about it if there is not already one. I like following its progress along with true sweet potato seed. Also i'm interested to learn more about the apparent anti movement that was hinted at with the big government people and destroying true onion and garlic seed plants.

Richard Watson

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Re: Welcome and Introduce Yourself!
« Reply #58 on: 2019-03-07, 11:15:45 AM »
How are our leeks going your end Jennifer? myself and Jennifer have mixed together North American and what varieties were available here in NZ  and are currently stabilizing them. Till last summer I was still able to pick out the lighter coloured plants being from NA but not this summer, they look a very even green colour now. In time I might be able to pledge this new landrace.   
Changeable year round climate with warming winters - just under 500mm average yearly rainfall. 20 years of soil improvements plus sub soil top soil reversal means my garden beds are about half metre deep. Below that is 100's of metres of alluvial out wash from the Southern
alps.

Ferdzy

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Re: Welcome and Introduce Yourself!
« Reply #59 on: 2019-03-07, 11:45:07 AM »
Heya, Richard;

Leeks did quite well last year, the appearance of leek moth for the first time notwithstanding. Mr. Ferdzy dumped a bunch of diatomaceous earth on 'em and they all perked up again.

Those very pale green leeks were the offspring of Inegol, a Turkish variety/landrace. They are very distinctive even though they have so much variability that I am quite sure they are a landrace rather than a variety. I hope that means they bring some wild cards to the breeding table.

I actually hope to spend the next couple of years following up on a serendipitous event - we had self-seeded leeks in the spring of 2017. This has never happened for us before! (I suppose this is where half a dozen people chime in and say it happens all the time...) We transplanted them and grew them out as our leeks, because we managed to fry all our intentionally planted leek seedlings. They were quite unusual, I thought. They have a fair bit of variability (given that we didn't end up with a huge number of leeks) BUT their most noticeable trait is that they looked very perky and nice in the early spring of 2018. Our leeks are usually salvageable in the spring, but they generally look pretty dire and large amounts of them need to be trimmed away to get something edible. I hope these will end up as a stain of leeks suitable for overwintering and harvesting in the spring.

I believe the mother of all those plants was Verdonnet. The pollen would have come from Inegol, Bandit (aka Dark Green Winter), Giant Musselburgh, and itself perhaps. I'm definitely seeing the darker and lighter colours of Bandit and Inegol in the offspring. I would assume Giant Musselburgh is also represented, but it is a less distinguishable mid-green.

Unfortunately I don't think there are any overwintering this year as the ones we had growing were the ones we harvested for seed in the fall. We'll be planting that seed shortly.