Author Topic: Welcome and Introduce Yourself!  (Read 2605 times)

PaulJ

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Re: Welcome and Introduce Yourself!
« Reply #30 on: 2018-12-29, 10:35:10 AM »
Yep England.
I thought you'd get that from the "Blighty toms"  :D

I guess we'll have the opposite growing requirements eh

Richard Watson

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Re: Welcome and Introduce Yourself!
« Reply #31 on: 2018-12-29, 02:42:34 PM »
Yep England.
I thought you'd get that from the "Blighty toms"  :D

I guess we'll have the opposite growing requirements eh

Get some blight on potatoes but not on tomatoes

Joseph Lofthouse

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Re: Welcome and Introduce Yourself!
« Reply #32 on: 2018-12-29, 05:08:15 PM »

Hello, my name is Joseph, and I am a human being.

I grew up Mormon, on the farm that my great-great-great-grandmother settled when she she first came to Cache Valley, located north east of the Great Salt Lake. I farm in the same village today. Our farm was originally in Mexico, because my family fled the usa to escape an extermination order. Then the usa sent an army to conquer my people. So if I'm rather anarchic, and not nationalistic, it's for good reason. Many of my people share that sentiment, even if we don't talk about it openly. The Shoshone were welcomed on our farm, and they came each year to camp, and harvest their traditional foods in their traditional ways.

I learned math, chemistry, physics, computer programming, Spanish, and Russian in high school and university. I worked 20 years as a synthetic and analytical chemist. My work included things like creating the boron analog of glyphosate, isolating naturally occurring pesticides from plants, pesticide metabolism studies, research into chemical and biological weapons, identifying chemicals responsible for environmental pollution, and similar studies. As a computer programmer, I wrote software for the chemistry department at my laboratory, the Pentagon, Scotts Lawn, IBM, etc. I owned a web hosting company for 11 years. I owned a rock shop for 8 years.

Several decades ago, the black-ops that I was involved in at the laboratory really started to bother my conscious. To self-soothe, I quit my job as a chemist, took a vow of poverty, moved into a monastery, and served as principal of the order's high school. The Mormons didn't like my work, so we went our separate ways. These days, people call me druid, shaman, medicine man. When I left the monastery, I returned home to my origins as a farmer. I am currently farming 3 acres. About half of it in orchard, and the rest in annual crops.

My IQ is around 160, therefore I frequently chaffed at teachers and other authority figures with their "stupid" ideas telling me what to do and how to live. I'm still angry at my 7th grade English teacher for marking my paper wrong for using a word that wasn't in her vocabulary, and she was too know-it-all to look it up in a dictionary. These days, if I want to learn something, I just learn it, and escape the mindless dogma that was so common in my formal education. I spent most of my life without radio, TV, music, media, etc. Therefore, I avoided a lot of pop-culture social programming.  This just reinforces my tendencies towards anarchy.

My Briggs-Myers personality type is INTP. (If a dogma exists, it must be challenged.) My work as a research scientist was INTJ work, so that was bothersome to be working outside my inherent personality. When I started plant breeding, I continued working as a scientist, for a few years. Then I discovered landrace plant breeding, and transitioned into doing plant breeding as an artist. I have never been happier.

The highest honor I have received in my life was given by a Shoshone medicine woman lodge chief for being guardian of the tobacco.

A few months ago, I was being introduced to new friends, and was called "The father of landrace plant breeding". That was startling to me, but I have come to accept it. My writings have certainly helped to move the idea of "landrace" from something that was only done long ago by primitive savages into something that is done by the most cutting edge, forward thinking plant breeders. Seems to me, like inbreeding is a relic of a few decades of hubris, and that inherent genetic diversity is the more promising path forward through an age of environmental weirdening. So here's to landrace gardening: a path towards food security through common sense and traditional methods.

Here's a few photos from my past:

Growing up on the edge of civilization:


Chemist in the laboratory:


That was then, this is now:


Monk at the monastery:


Loving my squash:


From about a month ago -- Honoring the illiterate ancestors that developed every variety I am currently growing.




reed

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Re: Welcome and Introduce Yourself!
« Reply #33 on: 2018-12-29, 06:37:14 PM »
Joseph, holding a grudge over a word in a 7th grade paper? You just need to get over it.

I'm slightly dyslexic, self diagnosed and overcome a long time ago, well not the diagnosed part, cause I never heard of it before it came in fashion some years ago and well, not completely over it either but I find work arounds.

In grade school starting about 2nd grade we had math races at the black board. I would stand there with my eyes closed and listen to the 43 - 25 x 102 + 15 and so on as long as the teacher went on with it, then I would open my eyes and write down the answer, I was always right.

My 5th grade teacher Mrs. Cragmile, if I recall, God rest her sole, didn't like it. She thought I was cheating some how. She wanted me to write down every number she said, show my work, I couldn't do it, I couldn't even write them down, she'd say 89 and I'd write 98 or even 68, I knew what I wrote was wrong but I could still "cheat" by letting a separate part of me do it my way at the same time, so my answer was still always right. It completely freaked her out. Same on tests, if I had to think about math and write it down I couldn't do it so I did the same thing, I'd scrawl a bunch crap and the correct answer, the two being completely unrelated. 

She gave me a C on my report card, first time I ever got something other than A, I mean not even a B, a stinking  C! It made me so mad I cried, asked why a C? If I'm cheating why not F? That made her mad.

My dad took me to school next day in the cop car, in uniform with a side arm. He matched me into the principal's office and and politely asked to see Mrs Cragmile. Embarrassed the heck out of me but I got my A back and no more trouble with math races,  I just wasn't allowed to participate anymore, so the nasty old bag had the last word after all.   
« Last Edit: 2018-12-29, 06:58:54 PM by reed »

PaulJ

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Re: Welcome and Introduce Yourself!
« Reply #34 on: 2018-12-29, 06:53:21 PM »
Hi Joseph, Hi Reed, Hi All

Reed, It sounds like you were/are gifted at maths.
We have to accept as adults that this probably comes from insecurity (that and a closed mindedness) of the teacher, they have worked their whole life for something that comes so naturally to you. You didn't have to work hard for it like them, so you "shouldn't suceed" in their mind. It really is a case of jealousy.

Had a similar experience with an art teacher who was adamant I had traced all my drawings despite many peers sticking up for me and telling them I was truly good at it.
I still don't do much art to this day. We should make more effort not to dwell on these things, or at least I should. Maybe Ill do some drawing.

Joseph Lofthouse

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Re: Welcome and Introduce Yourself!
« Reply #35 on: 2018-12-29, 08:00:21 PM »

Reed: That moment in 7th grade, when I realized that my teachers were both wrong and arrogant is one of the defining moments in my life. I still derive power and enlightenment from it. LOL!

Richard Watson

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Re: Welcome and Introduce Yourself!
« Reply #36 on: 2018-12-30, 10:32:09 AM »
Paul - I had a similar experience in my art class at high school. I did not like the 'paint by numbers' style of art education which my male teacher at the time forced us the follow. Ever since I was 4-5 years old I loved to draw/paint from my imagination and at 15 having to sit and draw a pot or such like was way behind what I should have been working on, and so I couldn't have cared less about art at school. The end of year exams were marked at 0 -100, 50 was a pass, that teacher ( a red headed hippy who stunk bad and so was given the name Larry the loo brush) give me a 49 while he gave a 95 to a girl who had no talent but was a really really pretty girl and sucked up big time to him. But at the end of the day, I tried hard not to give a #@^& about that exam or the whole three years of art classes because I knew my art at home was at a whole different level to what I produced at school, but it did piss me off for years after.       

Walt

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Re: Welcome and Introduce Yourself!
« Reply #37 on: 2019-01-02, 01:51:17 PM »
In the 4th grade I gave a report on something Iread in Science Digest on evolution.  When I finished, the teacher asked me some questions which I answered.  Later, thinking about her questions, I realized she didn't believe in evolution!  I also realized I was smarter than my teacher.  That was when I realized I was largely on my own as far as education went.  I'm glad I grew up in a home with lots of books on science, medicine, and more.

William S.

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Re: Welcome and Introduce Yourself!
« Reply #38 on: 2019-01-02, 03:12:24 PM »
My little one just turned two. He has some books like "Up in The Garden and Down in the Dirt" that we both like. It's never too early to start influencing the youth.

I wonder what he will be like in twenty years after spending his formative years with my extensive collection of botany, mushroom id, insect id, bird and mammal id, foraging, animal husbandry, homesteading, gardening, and plant breeding books? Maybe he won't be influenced much by it. I know some of the books though I use on these topics came from my grandparents and I still use some that technically belong to my parents but which pretty much only I use. Also when he does visit his grandparents he will be exposed to even more of said books because they have a pretty good collection. Like I don't have a copy of the Humanure Handbook but I know my mom does! So it seems like a multigenerational fascination and I suspect the little guy is doomed to learn to enjoy nature.
« Last Edit: 2019-01-02, 03:16:13 PM by William S. »
Western Montana garden, glacial lake Missoula sediment lacustrian clay mollisoil sometimes with added sand in places. Zone 6A

Nicholas Locke

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Re: Welcome and Introduce Yourself!
« Reply #39 on: 2019-01-02, 10:03:35 PM »
My little one just turned two. He has some books like "Up in The Garden and Down in the Dirt" that we both like. It's never too early to start influencing the youth.

I wonder what he will be like in twenty years after spending his formative years with my extensive collection of botany, mushroom id, insect id, bird and mammal id, foraging, animal husbandry, homesteading, gardening, and plant breeding books? Maybe he won't be influenced much by it. I know some of the books though I use on these topics came from my grandparents and I still use some that technically belong to my parents but which pretty much only I use. Also when he does visit his grandparents he will be exposed to even more of said books because they have a pretty good collection. Like I don't have a copy of the Humanure Handbook but I know my mom does! So it seems like a multigenerational fascination and I suspect the little guy is doomed to learn to enjoy nature.

Don't be surprised If he turns out to be a cross dressing heavy metal drummer though! kids have a habit of destroying these grand ideas us parents think will or would like to happen!!   
"Maybe" said the farmer...

Richard Watson

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Re: Welcome and Introduce Yourself!
« Reply #40 on: 2019-01-04, 11:16:53 AM »
And Ive often seen it when the kids hit around 30 they start to see the world differently, the teens and 20's can be a frustrating period for a parent.   

Chiu-Ki Chan

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Re: Welcome and Introduce Yourself!
« Reply #41 on: 2019-01-07, 09:14:15 PM »
Hello! I'm Chiu-Ki Chan and I live 30 miles north of Denver, Colorado.

I want to set up a vegetable garden this year but it's winter right now so I cannot work on the soil yet. Instead I have been pouring over the gardening books at my local library, and recently read Plant Breeding for the Home Gardner by Joseph Tychonievich. I'm intrigued!

The book highlighted a few plant breeders, and I saw that Andrew Barney lives in Loveland, Colorado, which is 30 minutes north of me. So I looked him up and landed on this forum. Happy to meet y'all!

I don't really have any plant breeding experience, though I did save some seeds from the luffa I grew in a container two years ago. I never thought about breeding my own varieties until I read the book, which makes it very accessible. I am thinking of trying luffa as my first breeding project since it operates like a zucchini (male and female easy-to-seal flowers) so it is easy to control the pollination. I love eating luffas and I want to adapt them to Colorado climate.

Raymondo

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Re: Welcome and Introduce Yourself!
« Reply #42 on: 2019-01-08, 02:24:43 AM »
Welcome Chiu-Ki. I’d also recommend Carol Deppe’s book Breed Your Own Vegetable Varieties which is not only a great intro to veg breeding but a great book on the whys and wherefores of seed saving.
Ray
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Andrew Barney

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Re: Welcome and Introduce Yourself!
« Reply #43 on: 2019-01-08, 09:40:05 AM »
Hello Chiu-Ki Chan! Yep, that's me. Lol.  Welcome to the forum! I still live in Loveland, but next summer I might move to Fort Collins to pursue a degree in plant breeding at CSU.

Hi Klaus! Good to see you here!

Carol Deppe

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Re: Welcome and Introduce Yourself!
« Reply #44 on: 2019-01-15, 10:13:25 AM »
Hello! I'm Chiu-Ki Chan and I live 30 miles north of Denver, Colorado.

I am thinking of trying luffa as my first breeding project since it operates like a zucchini (male and female easy-to-seal flowers) so it is easy to control the pollination. I love eating luffas and I want to adapt them to Colorado climate.
Hello Chiu-Ki. I'm the cheerfully greedy Chair of the OSSI Variety Review Committee. OSSI doesn't have any luffas....  ;)