Author Topic: Forcing Blooms / Turning Biennials into annuals  (Read 681 times)

Andrew Barney

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Re: Forcing Blooms / Turning Biennials into annuals
« Reply #15 on: 2018-12-30, 09:38:25 AM »
Feral radishes eh? How fun! I should try that. Problem is, that grasshoppers are ferocious predators of radish seed pods in my garden. Hmm. Sounds like it's finally time to get some chickens out there.


There is a wild radish plant that grows here off and on. It is all over the city.  A weed I guess. I don't know where it came from but it has some spicy seed pods. Maybe I should collect seeds for it and cross it with some other radishes bred for large seed pods. These have little purple radish flowers.

reed

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Re: Forcing Blooms / Turning Biennials into annuals
« Reply #16 on: 2019-04-29, 03:48:37 AM »
I was out hand weeding yesterday, too wet to do much else but discovered many more than usual volunteer radishes, yea! Generally there are just a few which of course I have left for seed so guess they are finally really getting adjusted to being weeds. There were enough in one spot I thinned them out a little and ate the little sprouts, yum.

More surprising and exciting is a couple much larger radish looking plants. My first overwintered radish? Hope so. They are rather nasty looking with brown/yellow leaves so didn't taste them but looked to have strong healthy growth starting in the center, Not in particularly good spots as far as prepping to plant other stuff but will leave them where they are and work around rather than attempt transplanting. 

Ilex

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Re: Forcing Blooms / Turning Biennials into annuals
« Reply #17 on: 2019-04-30, 04:53:35 AM »
Some carrots will grow out of the soil if they find it hard, just like daikon does. A useful characteristic if the carrot in question is purple as it won't become green/bitter.

Other option is to select for short carrots.  I select for 6'' or less, at 300 grams or more.

If I remember well, annual/biannual has very simple genetics. A single gene?  Most puple/black carrots are annuals.

I guess a few weeks in the refrigerator would force them to bolt.