Author Topic: Crossing plants not flowering at the same time  (Read 144 times)

Ocimum

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Crossing plants not flowering at the same time
« on: 2018-10-12, 02:36:43 PM »
What ways are there to cross plants not flowering during the same time?

Pollen conservation
Pollen can be dehydrated in vacuum and frozen, and be kept in the freezer for a few years. Needs some equipment in wetter climate, can be built with cheap materials. A link in french about how to do it.
https://www.cactuspro.com/articles/_media/conservation_du_pollen/conservation_du_pollen.pdf

Climate manipulation
By this I mean manipulating the senses of the plant so they think it is another time of the year. Can be done by keeping rooted plants in a refrigerator so they come out later, at the same time as the other one. Or by putting one plant in a greenhouse, so it starts earlier than the ones outside. These techniques of climate manipulation may not work on photosensitive plants if the lighting is not managed.

Are there other techniques to cross plants not flowering at the same time?
I came thinking about this because Allium ursinum and Allium sativa do not flower at the same time. I was wondering if I could cross them, to create a seedy garlic which produces many bulbs, grows in half-shade, as a companion plant in orchards.

Joseph Lofthouse

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Re: Crossing plants not flowering at the same time
« Reply #1 on: 2018-10-12, 05:12:10 PM »

Other climate manipulations could be things like putting a box over the plants in the evening, then take it off in the morning, to regulate the photo-period. Or grow them in a chamber with totally artificial lighting.

Diane Whitehead

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Re: Crossing plants not flowering at the same time
« Reply #2 on: 2018-10-12, 10:20:05 PM »
Almost all of my breeding over the past 70 years has been with flowers, most of which were blooming together, although rhododendron pollen kept in paper envelopes in my kitchen successfully pollinated flowers that bloomed four months later.

Some vegetable pollen, like that of corn, remains viable for an extremely short time.  I don't think drying and freezing would help, and airmail is probably too slow to import some from the Southern Hemisphere, though that might be a possibility for some other vegetables.

It would be helpful to have a chart of viability times.
Victoria, British Columbia, Canada
cool mediterranean climate  warm dry summers, mild wet winters,  70 cm rain,   sandy soil

bill

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Re: Crossing plants not flowering at the same time
« Reply #3 on: 2018-10-13, 12:44:14 AM »
I routinely store potato pollen in the freezer for a year.  No special equipment required - just a small container and a silica desiccant packet.

S.Simonsen

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Re: Crossing plants not flowering at the same time
« Reply #4 on: 2018-10-20, 07:06:23 PM »
I am working with Canna and the old selected clone with huge tubers flowers through the winter when the original species I want to cross it with have finished up already. I found that cutting back the original species hard when they are budding sets back their flowering cycle, so they reinitiate flowering and it lines up nicely with the winter flowering clone. I tried various methods of drying and cooling Canna pollen but it seems to be like closely related banana in that the pollen rapidly loses viability during any form of storage. The best I could do was in the fridge without drying for about a week, very similar to banana.

William S.

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Re: Crossing plants not flowering at the same time
« Reply #5 on: 2018-10-20, 08:03:54 PM »
I need to get serious about saving tomato pollen. It would help quite a bit with crosses I want to make. My project is currently in stasis because my pollen donor S. Peruvianum plants stopped producing flowers while I was gone. If I'd stored some pollen I would still be in business.

http://tgc.ifas.ufl.edu/vol1/v1p11.html
« Last Edit: 2018-10-20, 08:11:04 PM by William S. »
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William S.

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Re: Crossing plants not flowering at the same time
« Reply #6 on: 2018-10-21, 04:58:12 AM »
http://tomatoville.com/showthread.php?t=1159

This tomatoville thread talks about storing tomato pollen in microcentrifuge tube by drying it for a day in the fridge, then freezing.

Other link talks about CACL2 as the drying agent. William Whitson mentions using silica gel above in his post about potato pollen which should be really similar to tomato for my purposes.
Western Montana garden, glacial lake Missoula sediment lacustrian clay mollisoil sometimes with added sand in places. Zone 6A

jocelyn

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Re: Crossing plants not flowering at the same time
« Reply #7 on: 2018-10-28, 02:15:11 AM »
Silica works well for chestnut pollen too. It freezes for at least a year when well dried. It keeps about 7 or 8 days in the fridge, not dried,
and a flowering branch can be kept in a jug of water in the fridge for about a week too.  Nut grafts can bloom the year placed, and that makes a potted pollen donor and it can be transported to the mother plant some distance away.  Same thing for grafts into a potted seedling, grin.  If it's not differing flowering period, it can be geography, grin.