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Now that the weather is warming up nicely with 5-6 more days over 30 deg to come i should see some good growth. The biggest plant in the front is a clone that's never flowered and doesn't look likely too either, Okinawan Purple' and Chris's EFR dont have flower buds either, disappointing considering how well it flowered in spring inside the tunnel house




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Plant Breeding / Re: Breeding Sweet Potato in Australia
« Last post by gmuller on Today at 12:57:09 PM »
Gregg, can you post a picture of the leaf shape / plant? I think the only all white I have is American White, very vigorous all green leaves. Commercial starch variety in the USA.

Cheers
Steve
Steve, pics of the white sweet potato. Has purple bases to the petiole, and purple venation on the under surface.
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Community & Forum Building / Re: The business of seed growing
« Last post by William S. on Today at 12:56:09 PM »
Anyone know roughly how much seed is needed for a seed offering / how big of a tomato patch to plant to grow a seed offering? Was just looking at isolation distances and could make ~6 well isolated tomato patches on the land where tomato plants seem to coexist well with the deer. Was wondering if 100 plants might be enough of each variety/population.
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Plant Breeding / Re: Tomato traits
« Last post by Andrew Barney on Today at 12:15:53 PM »
Dwarf, determinate and tangerine are all recessive.   
The way to do this without growing 64+ F2, grow as many F2 as you can and save seed from all the ones that show any one or two of your recessives.   You can cross these siblings with one another in the F2 or in F3 or later, to increase your ratio of missing recessives in combination.   This is really the only way to maximize your ability to select for other traits like fruit quality, plant health etc. without growing thousands of plants.   If it takes 64+ (expected) to find one plant with the 3 recessives, there is a bottleneck on your other traits that can put a limit on future selection, if for example desired taste traits, plant health, earliness or other, are not there in that single F2 plant.
One handy thing about the dwarf with rugose leaf, you can identify these when seedlings are quite small.   That means in any generation you want to do a broad selection for that trait, you can grow masses of seedlings and just cull all the non dwarves right off the bat.
Determinate doesn't have a good 'tell' at the seedling stage, especially in det X indet, expect to get a really big variety of growth habits and leaf/cluster patterns.   I have seen F2 determinates that grew just like an indet and then produced the terminal bud after 7 or 8 regular pattern (3 leaf nodes between clusters).   Also the number of leaf nodes before the first cluster is a genetically separate trait from indet/det.  As also the QTL(s) for internode length.   
The dwarf trait may tend to shorten internodes in heterozygous plants, where the rugose leaf is masked.
Make sure of your tangerine parent, in case you didn't know, there are several other genes that produce orange fruit.  Beta orange is quite common.   These genes are unrelated to the tangerine gene, and behave differently.   tangerine will only show up when homozygous, afaik it is completely masked in heterozygous state.
Great project!    :)

I applaud this reply. Best plant breeding advice for stacked recessives! If you follow this plan I can't see how you can go wrong!
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Plant Breeding / Re: Tomato traits
« Last post by Steph S on Today at 08:06:39 AM »
Dwarf, determinate and tangerine are all recessive.   
The way to do this without growing 64+ F2, grow as many F2 as you can and save seed from all the ones that show any one or two of your recessives.   You can cross these siblings with one another in the F2 or in F3 or later, to increase your ratio of missing recessives in combination.   This is really the only way to maximize your ability to select for other traits like fruit quality, plant health etc. without growing thousands of plants.   If it takes 64+ (expected) to find one plant with the 3 recessives, there is a bottleneck on your other traits that can put a limit on future selection, if for example desired taste traits, plant health, earliness or other, are not there in that single F2 plant.
One handy thing about the dwarf with rugose leaf, you can identify these when seedlings are quite small.   That means in any generation you want to do a broad selection for that trait, you can grow masses of seedlings and just cull all the non dwarves right off the bat.
Determinate doesn't have a good 'tell' at the seedling stage, especially in det X indet, expect to get a really big variety of growth habits and leaf/cluster patterns.   I have seen F2 determinates that grew just like an indet and then produced the terminal bud after 7 or 8 regular pattern (3 leaf nodes between clusters).   Also the number of leaf nodes before the first cluster is a genetically separate trait from indet/det.  As also the QTL(s) for internode length.   
The dwarf trait may tend to shorten internodes in heterozygous plants, where the rugose leaf is masked.
Make sure of your tangerine parent, in case you didn't know, there are several other genes that produce orange fruit.  Beta orange is quite common.   These genes are unrelated to the tangerine gene, and behave differently.   tangerine will only show up when homozygous, afaik it is completely masked in heterozygous state.
Great project!    :)
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Plant Breeding / Re: Breeding Sweet Potato in Australia
« Last post by ImGrimmer on Today at 02:13:24 AM »
Is cold the non-optimal condition your concerned? If so it still might not help that much as the roots would also want to be warm, unless maybe you could heat the soil with black plastic or something.

Yes that was my second thought. Cold soil might be the biggest problem.
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Plant Breeding / Re: Breeding Sweet Potato in Australia
« Last post by whwoz on Yesterday at 09:23:17 PM »
Just checked my sweet potato plants and the ornamental purple leaf is starting to put out some buds,  only small at this stage, not seeing any on any of the other varieties.
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looks like here is the place to start.
http://ccafs-climate.org/
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Let me know what you think of it.

Fine scale would be really useful to us as well.  Microclimate makes a huge difference. 
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I am going to try this,
I live in california and there is not any weather station anywhere near me that has anywhere close to accurate readings (even for the area they are located in).
the official stations are so broken (especially for rainfall) that they were totally useless for farming uses.
the weather stations in the valley where the farmland is are accurate, but they don't apply to me at all.
so I started keeping my own records
and just by looking at them and past years patterns I get way better results.
also I count rain over the season and not by calender year as the weather service does. I have no need to have my rain totals cut in 1/3 (from 2 seemingly broken weather stations) and also averaged with a year ago when looking at the winter season.

so, I wonder if this data set they have can fix fundamental errors in data collection that so many of the weather stations seem to have.
I hope it can, would be nice to have another useful tool to use.

by the way, it seems like the weather stations in the middle of CA are broken because the way they are broken "proves" how little water the state is getting with the way they average the readings, and is to some degree how the water conservation laws got passed.
any source of weather I can find that has political outcomes seems to get messed with. and other data is getting harder and harder to find.
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