Recent Posts

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Plant Breeding / Re: Blight Resistance in Potatoes and Tomatoes
« Last post by reed on Yesterday at 06:30:13 PM »
I'm gonna use the heirloom Mr. Stripey as a foundation in my tomato breeding cause it has done well for me for many years and I hope it will go a long way toward increasing fruit size and flavor of those I might cross it with.

I'm mentioning this because there is another tomato called Tigerella that makes much smaller tomatoes. It also does fairly well here but tastes terrible in my opinion. I don't really know which is truly which but when I bought seeds labeled Mr. Stripey they were actually Tigerella. Some seeds I was gifted by an old fellow in KY that he called Mr. Stripey are the big good ones and it is the one that I call Mr. Stripey.

Anyway if anyone gets Mr. Stripey and it grows baseball sized and smaller fruits that are red with yellow streaks  on the skin it isn't what I call Mr. Stripey. Mr. Stripey is a large tomato with green shoulders. They are very similar in appearance to the variety Pineapple but produce better here and are not quite as sweet.
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Community & Forum Building / Re: OSSI website
« Last post by Carol Deppe on Yesterday at 05:19:46 PM »
An announcement about the forum went out today to OSSI's email list.
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Community & Forum Building / Re: Welcome and Introduce Yourself!
« Last post by Chiu-Ki Chan on Yesterday at 10:15:52 AM »
The Designation Agreement you sign as part of the application to Pledge a variety includes language to the effect that none of the germplasm used has any patents or restrictions on it that would preclude Pledging it to the best of your knowledge.

That's good to know! Makes me much more comfortable with breeding for OSSI.

Hi and welcome Chiu-Ki Chan,

I am also interested in Luffa for short season/cold climate. I managed to produce them only once, and this in a greenhouse.

If you are interested you can work publicly with the experimental farm network.
https://www.experimentalfarmnetwork.org/
You can pledge the seeds OSSI, and exchange them with other breeders.

Best

Hi Ocimum! Yes I would love to work with you and others to breed short season cold climate luffa.

Thanks for letting me know about experimental farm network. I don't think I have enough clarity to create a project there yet, but I made a thread here to get started: http://opensourceplantbreeding.org/forum/index.php?topic=122.0
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Plant Breeding / Breeding short season cold climate luffa
« Last post by Chiu-Ki Chan on Yesterday at 10:13:46 AM »
I don't really have any plant breeding experience, though I did save some seeds from the luffa I grew in a container two years ago. I am thinking of trying luffa as my first breeding project since it operates like a zucchini (male and female easy-to-seal flowers) so it is easy to control the pollination. I love eating luffas and I want to adapt them to Colorado climate.

Starting a new thread on luffa breeding.

I have chosen smooth luffa (Luffa aegyptiaca / Luffa cylindrica) instead of angled luffa (Luffa_acutangula). The lack of ridges makes it easier to peel for cooking and also to make sponges.

The goal is to make a variety that works well in cold climates, which have short growing seasons. My definition of "cold climate" is somewhere that snows. I am in northern Colorado (zone 5b), which is also dry and windy.

Selection criteria:
  • Transplants well. I just heard about winter sowing and will try to start my seeds this way.
  • Fruits early.
  • Large total production.

I have never done any plant breeding so I'd appreciate your help and guidance.

Also, if you'd like to breed luffa with me please reply with your location, climate, and why you are interested in luffas. I'd love to collaborate.

Thanks!
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Plant Breeding / Re: legal status of many varieties investigated
« Last post by Ocimum on Yesterday at 08:07:17 AM »
It is interesting that you mentionned Chioggia, as it is an old variety (or derivated of) already known in the 1800's. That means that I could take seeds of a variety, make a MTA contract allowing no one to breed from it, and be the owner of it.

But on this
Material transfer agreements are contracts, and are enforceable as contract law.
...
I am not sure if Europe has the same laws. Some contracts are not valid in all countries.

Beside the ethical and biopiratery problem, I will never be sure if someone worked with my material or a similar one. As an example with Chioggia, if the "owner" attacks me for using his material, he will not be able to prove wether I used his material or one which predates his "ownership". On the other hand, if I keep some of the original seed, I may be able to prove genetically that it is different, i.e. less inbred than his by doing some expensive genetic tests. In other words, the only one able to prove that he using "owned" material is the one using it. The other cannot prove it. And with the presumption of innocence it does not work...

Now what if person A gives B seeds with a MTA stipulating B cannot use it for breeding. B shares seeds with C without telling C about it at a seed fair with thousands of people, no record keeping. C uses the seed to breed a new variety. How is A going to go against C? What could happen to C or his variety?
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Community & Forum Building / Re: Welcome and Introduce Yourself!
« Last post by Ocimum on Yesterday at 07:40:39 AM »
... If I want to breed for OSSI, ...
 luffa ...

Hi and welcome Chui-Ki Chan,

I am also interested in Luffa for short season/cold climate. I managed to produce them only once, and this in a greenhouse.

If you are interested you can work publicly with the experimental farm network.
https://www.experimentalfarmnetwork.org/
You can pledge the seeds OSSI, and exchange them with other breeders.

Best
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Plant Breeding / Re: Blight Resistance in Potatoes and Tomatoes
« Last post by reed on Yesterday at 03:26:12 AM »
I got my packet of ten Iron Lady F1 seeds today. If I manage to get any crosses made to it. Would grow out the F1 in 2020 and then in 2021 would love someone with blight and disease issues like you have Reed to take some of the F2 seed and grow it out. Otherwise I don't see how this works without the lab work DNA tests Carol mentioned.

I would be very happy to try out some of the Iron Lady crosses. Have to admit though, I'm not optimistic about seeds from areas that don't have much in the way of tomato disease cause like I said we have lots.  And we have lots of stink bugs that happily cause their own issues as well as spread the diseases around. I don't really know how or even bother to try to identify them specifically, I just refer to them collectively as tomato disease. If a plant lives and produces it's tolerant or resistant, if not, it isn't. I don't know if I'd even get a seed from something that doesn't have at least some tolerance of the other brown spots, grey fuzzies and curled up leaves that prompt me to cull some plants before they've  hardly even bloomed. And I'm convinced the awful hot dry spells that are common now play a role, as well as the weird cool cloudy ones.

It is likely that my small garden being used for decades has turned into it's own little petri dish for all the diseases, especially since I don't follow any thing close to recommended sanitation practices but I figure if a person did that while saving their own seeds they might at the some time be breeding for plants with no tolerances at all. Then one day they screw up and trial the wrong seed or throw that wrong store bought item in the compost or just a bad wind blows and everything dies.

My plants die but not till after our canning jars are full and some keep going a little longer. The pimps like I said still go till frost. It would sure be nice to have big ones that do that again.
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Plant Breeding / Bangor University research on late blight
« Last post by Diane Whitehead on 2019-01-15, 03:12:02 PM »
Tom Wagner reported that one of his tomatoes was part of a study for a PhD in Wales.  The doctorate was awarded to James Stroud in 2015.  I was hoping for a quick way to see the results of his trials, but haven't succeeded yet.

Before he began, in 2011, there was a suspicion that some strains of blight favoured tomatoes over potatoes.  Here are the objectives of the study:

https://www.bangor.ac.uk/natural-sciences/research/environment-natural-resources-and-geography/facilities/tomato_project.php.en

Experimental Aims

Evaluate a wide range of existing tomato genotypes for resistance to late blight, caused by Phytophthora infestans.
Create an experimental mapping population of hybrid tomato plants that segregate for different blight resistance genes for understanding inheritance of resistance and selecting better varieties.
Establish whether the tomato based P. infestans population is different from the potato based P. infestans population and investigate which factors lead to host specialisation.

The thesis has been published, and I have read the abstract.

https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do;jsessionid=711592F7854B0F4352955A905943F197?uin=uk.bl.ethos.690686

The conclusion of it:

Taken as a whole, the findings of these studies indicated that novel tomato cultivars with P. infestans resistance from a broad range of genes are needed to combat the threat from a highly diverse and evolving P. infestans population. The breeding and mapping work undertaken in this project makes some contribution to addressing this challenge, although further work is needed to fully capitalise on this.

So, no quick look at the list of tomatoes tested, though maybe if someone is able to download the whole thesis they could find the list.
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Plant Breeding / Re: Increasing and Improving Wild Grape Diversity
« Last post by Richard Watson on 2019-01-15, 03:04:38 PM »
Its a wonder that grapes haven't got themselfs established gave the number of vineyards within a 50km of here, they do use nets but seeing the amount of holes in these nets birds must get over and eat some. It may well be too dry for the seed to germinate and it would only be in the shingle river beds were it could, all other areas are farm land so sheep and cattle would make short work of any seedling.
I did get a grape seedling in my compost heap in spring, Ive got that now planted out so it will be interesting to see what comes of that 
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Plant Breeding / Re: legal status of many varieties investigated
« Last post by Carol Deppe on 2019-01-15, 02:40:16 PM »
Being from Europe, I wonder about the legality and enforcability of these material transfer agreements here.
There is a breeder's derogation (Züchterprivileg) which allows breeders to use PVP protected varieties to breed new ones.

Material transfer agreements are contracts, and are enforceable as contract law.

In USA, it's legal to breed from PVPed varieties with three exceptions. First, you cant use a PVP to produce an F1 hybrid for sale as a hybrid without permission. Second, you cant legally develop something by multiple rounds of recurrent backcrossing to the PVP variety without permission. It isnt spelled out how many recurrent backcrosses are permitted before the derivative is considered a violation. Third, a sport may or may not also be covered by the original PVP. If it is, if you breed from the sport, the result could still be owned by the holder of the PVP on the original variety.
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