Show Posts

This section allows you to view all posts made by this member. Note that you can only see posts made in areas you currently have access to.


Topics - B. Copping

Pages: [1]
1
Seed Saving / Blossom Bags
« on: 2019-08-26, 09:28:24 PM »
What do you all use for blossom bags?

I’m currently stapling them together out of bits of floating row cover, but am open to other methods.

2
OSSI pledged varieties / Pea ‘Joni’s Taxi’
« on: 2019-08-08, 10:18:39 AM »
And so it is, gardening friends, that I am looking for information on this variety.

I have it growing in the Seed Library’s garden; I’d like to find a descriptor list for comparison/quality control purposes.
My attempts to find this type of information on the OSSI website were futile.

Could someone kindly point me in the right direction?
TIA.

3
Seed Saving / Eggplant ‘White Egg’
« on: 2019-07-27, 12:46:53 PM »
This variety is being grown, for both production, and to be able to offer seeds through Seed Libraries.
Three different locations and garden conditions.

I did the first round of plant evaluations a couple of days ago.
Variability in both flower colour, and number of fruit/node.

I think I might just dig this plant up at the end of the season and bring it indoors.

4
Community & Forum Building / Jpeg vs. Jpg
« on: 2019-06-29, 10:47:20 AM »
Hello,

I have tried attaching photos to posts that result in an error, stating the allowed file extentions, and showing that the photo I was trying to upload has a jpeg file extention (not permitted).

I am fairly certain the extention *is* jpg. Two different programs tell me so. :)

Since the file name in the error message is not the same as the file name of picture I am uploading, is this an issue with some image conversion software on the server?

Confused.

Edit: current work around is to upload the pictures to google drive, rename them there, and then attach the picture from there.

Is the file extention case sensitive?
Some of the files I’m uploading to drive show up with JPG, not jpg. (I changed them to lowercase.)


5
Seed Saving / Bunias orientalis
« on: 2019-06-06, 10:22:01 PM »
Bunias orientalis (Turkish Rocket; Hill Mustard)

I have a tendancy to try out *new to me* plants every year.
Last year I managed to get seeds of Bunias orientalis in the ground.
The survivors (it was a bad year for winterkill) were transplanted and will flower soon.

Since this is a species, I’m not concerned about any crossing. :)

Has anyone else here grown this?
(I won’t get a taste test until next spring, seed increase takes priority).

6
Seed Saving / General Pea Information.
« on: 2019-02-11, 01:11:11 PM »
A thread for general information about peas (not cultivar specific)
So please post your gems here. :)
.
.
.

PEAS
                        HEIGHT        SPACING          READY(to eat)
                        -Supports     Plant  Row

Dwarf               Up to 2’       2-3”   18-24”    60 days
(Early)                -Not usually

Half-dwarf        2’ to 4’       (3”)    30-36”    70 days
(Mid-season)       -Optional

Tall                   4’ to 6+’     3-4”    48”         80 days
(Late)                 -Recommended


25 Vegetables Anyone Can Grow
Ann Roe Robbins (1942)
Dover Edition: ISBN 0-486-23029-5
Pages 137-9


Now I’ll have to figure out which genes belong to which type...
(Mini rant: Anadale Mono is not a monospaced font...)

7
Community & Forum Building / Photo gallery?
« on: 2019-02-09, 11:45:36 AM »
Hello admins,

I don’t usually post photos to messagboards, so my experience is limited.
Does this board have a photo galllery that I can upload images to?

TIA

8
Remove seeds that do not look like the majority.
They might be a different variety, cross, mutant, diseased, etc...

(Plant them separately if you like)

Sometimes what you buy off the seed racks can exhibit a great deal of “variety”.
This can be fun, but not if you thought you were buying a cultivar, and plan on saving seeds.

9
Seed Saving / [Cultivar Information] PEA ‘Dwarf Gray Sugar’
« on: 2019-01-29, 06:44:14 PM »
I recently read a post requesting assistance in maintaining this variety.
Please feel free to add information to this thread.
.
.
.
DWARF GRAY SUGAR

Introduced in 1892, ‘Dwarf Gray Sugar’ is a classic pea with multiple uses.
When picked in the flat pod stage, they are useful in stir-fried dishes or salads.
If you prefer, you can allow the pods to develop for a harvest for shelled green peas.

Type: Edible podded (Snow Pea; Mange-tout)

Maturity: Mid-season
For eating: 67+ days
Seed maturity: 80+ days

Height: Half-dwarf; up to 3’ (depends on the environment)
Staking/Support: Recommended

Flowers: Purple and violet

Pod Type: Edible
Pod Colour: Green
Pod Size: up to 3”
Pods/Node: 1 or 2 (depends on the environment)
Seeds/Pod: 4-7

Seed Coat: Green with purple dots; sometimes brown.
Cotyledons: Wrinkled; Green

Other Notable Features:
- Purple ring in the leaf axil
- Pod shrinks around seed as it dries

Pages: [1]