Open Source Plant Breeding Forum

General Category => Seed Saving => Topic started by: Ocimum on 2019-09-10, 06:28:11 AM

Title: Viability of green tomato seeds
Post by: Ocimum on 2019-09-10, 06:28:11 AM
How early can I harvest tomatoes so the seeds are still viable?
Is the mature size enough? Is a slight color change enough?

I know, ripe is best. But I will be travelling when they are ripe.

I crossed some tomatoes with something like "coyote", and it would be disappointing if they did not survive. My goal are some bigger tomatoes which still stand Phytophtora as well as "coyote".
Title: Re: Viability of green tomato seeds
Post by: Lauren on 2019-09-10, 10:25:16 AM
Maybe consider putting a bag around your "seed" tomatoes so they drop into the bag and you can harvest them when you return? Or harvest them green. If they're starting to turn they'll ripen just fine inside.
Title: Re: Viability of green tomato seeds
Post by: William S. on 2019-09-10, 06:26:02 PM
When tomatoes are mature but green they are a different color of green. If there is a slight blush go ahead. Do let the tomato fully ripen before fermenting the seed though if you can.
Title: Re: Viability of green tomato seeds
Post by: Ocimum on 2019-09-11, 02:32:55 AM
Ok, thanks.
It's always difficult to ask someone to do stuff like this for me.
Title: Re: Viability of green tomato seeds
Post by: William S. on 2019-09-11, 09:11:57 PM
Yeah, last summer I would leave for a work trip and take my seed saving tomatoes with me for evenings. My son is enough of a handful to leave behind for my wife. However had a work trailer I towed out. This year I'm doing something similar. Just rinsed about 7 little batches. Have one domestic ripening and all the half wilds and wilds ripening.
Title: Re: Viability of green tomato seeds
Post by: Steph S on 2019-11-13, 02:51:27 PM
If you have a green ripe or blushing tomato, put it in a bag and let it ripen completely there before you save the seeds.   
Seeds from less ripe tomatoes, (and/or bag ripened tomatoes) will likely be viable but they may not have the longevity of seed from a fully ripe tomato.  So if you have to do that, don't leave them for years before you grow out.  That was advice given by Tom Wagner.
I also have noticed, that the seed from less ripe tomatoes takes longer to remove the gel caps in fermentation.  It is cleaner and quick to ferment really ripe ones.
I've grown out lots of seed from late tomatoes that had to be ripened in a bag, and that is not a problem except for the longevity caution from Tom.