Open Source Plant Breeding Forum

General Category => Plant Breeding => Topic started by: Doro on 2019-03-13, 02:42:51 AM

Title: TPS 2019
Post by: Doro on 2019-03-13, 02:42:51 AM
It's about 6-8 weeks before I can plant outside.
Which means that it's time to get my TPS started ;D I'm very excited for this potato season.
What I'm sowing this year are some intentional crosses and a few seeds from bonus berries which set on their own.

Blå Congo x Salad Blue - looking for colourful early to mid season potatoes with high berry setting ability
Highland Burgundy Red x Blå Congo - looking for something starchy
Apache x Blå Congo - doing another round of these, had some plants of this cross last year and results were promising, must grow more
Mayan Gold x Inca Bella and vice versa, mixed seed, diploids - hopefully something with decent tuber dormancy will show up
Salad Blue selfed - just want to see what colours and textures it's hiding in its genepool
Linda OP - selfing unlikely, guessing on Salad Blue or Blå Congo as pollen donor, might be interesting, Linda is a really tasty and healthy growing variety
Unknown Early OP - selfing unlikely, pollen donor could be anything really, can't pass the rare occasion when an early potato successfully made seed
Heiderot F1 keeper seedling OP - ah well why not, more red potatoes will be nice

What TPS are you sowing this year?
Anyone else who is starting seeds now?
Title: Re: TPS 2019
Post by: reed on 2019-03-13, 06:38:19 AM
Our climate is getting less and less friendly to potatoes, to the point I'm not devoting much effort to them. But a few seasons ago I planted the variety White Superior and one plant made two berries with seeds. I was thinking the other day I should get them out and give em a try so I'll be doing that real soon.
I have a good supply of seeds I was gifted but I read that they stay viable for a very long time so I'm leaving them in storage for now.
Title: Re: TPS 2019
Post by: Doro on 2019-03-13, 07:02:35 AM
That's sad that climate change makes them increasingly difficult to grow for you. I could not imagine having to stop growing them... worst nightmare kind of thing for me. Just love potatoes lol
Have you tried first earlies? They are tricky to breed with, but they make a crop very quick. They are done in June for me or can be planted late as an autumn crop, ~4 months before fist frost. That avoids any hot dry months if that's the issue.
My TPS does not have a chance of getting old ;) because I sow them as soon as I can. But I also heard they stay viable for some years.
Title: Re: TPS 2019
Post by: Doro on 2019-03-22, 02:55:41 AM
They are up after a week and germination was quite good in all of them.
Title: Re: TPS 2019
Post by: rowan on 2019-03-22, 10:20:08 AM
I have just finished harvesting mine here in Aus. The climate is getting difficult for most potatoes here but I am concentrating on selecting for more heat and dry tolerance to help with that. I have found that the diploids grow, flower and tuberise so much better in the heat than tetras so I am concentrating on those in particular - especially those that are very early to beat the hottest part of summer and have low dormancy to be able to plant two or three crops in the season. Our seasons are long here.
Title: Re: TPS 2019
Post by: bill on 2019-03-22, 10:47:24 AM
Blue Congo and Salad Blue are both considered to be synonyms of All Blue, so that first cross is probably a self.  It sounds like you have plenty of diversity in the parents though, so lots of fun seedlings to look forward to.

Do you normally grow seedlings under the conditions shown?  They look like they desperately need more light.
Title: Re: TPS 2019
Post by: Doro on 2019-03-22, 12:28:08 PM
@Rowan 3 crops of diploids in one year sounds wonderful! My high dormancy diploids are really struggling with the long storage. I hope they survive until planting time.

@Bill they might be considered synonyms in the US. Sadly names of varieties get confused and lumped into a familiar name a lot when they travel. But they are actually 2 different varieties in Europe. Blå Congo is an old Swedish variety. It's often called Blue Swede or Blue Congo in other European countries, but it's from Sweden. It's on the floury side, a mid season variety. The plant habit, flowers and tuber characteristics are different from the UK Salad Blue. Tuber skin colour is a warm purple on Blå Congo and a cool blueishpurple on Salad Blue. Colour saturation in the tuber is less uniform in B.C. than in S.B. The UK Salad Blue is also a very waxy salad potato, not floury at all. Both are different in taste too. Blå Congo has a good strong oldfashioned potato flavour, getting earthy if overfertilized. Salad Blue is very mild and well balanced.

I always grow them like that :) daylight in march is ok here, as long as it's not too cloudy all the time. I find that more light isn't really necessary for potatoes.
They get repotted once or twice before I can plant outdoors. Since I plant them deep each time, just letting the top leafs stick out, they make lots of roots on the leggy stems. I think deep rooted TPS give a better harvest than shallow plants.
Title: Re: TPS 2019
Post by: bill on 2019-03-22, 01:24:57 PM
Yeah, that happens a lot with potatoes.  The names get confused and then sorting out the mess is nearly impossible.

I've always found that leggy potato seedlings are difficult to harden off, but I guess if the light improves while you are going through the process of potting them up, that probably balances things out.
Title: Re: TPS 2019
Post by: Doro on 2019-03-23, 03:19:21 AM
Yeah, by now I have a whole list of potato variety synonyms. And another list with things to grow out side by side, where I am suspecting it's two varieties sharing a name.

Now I'm wondering if All Blue was a third variety originally and the imported B.C. and S.B. just got lumped into it because they are all blue hahaha I'll grow Blå Congo and Salad Blue this year. I can do a side by side picture comparison of them for reference. The differences between the two are quite obvious. It should be possible to tell if there is a third one hiding in the All Blue mystery.
Anyone growing All Blue? I know Tim isn't ;)

The daylength is indeed rapidly increasing for me. Daylight today is 12h 25m, in 4 weeks it's 15h already and on Midsummer it's almost 19h. Not real midnight sun, but pretty long.
The only issues I have at hardening off time is the strong spring sun burning seedlings if I'm not careful. I got triple glass windows at the house, UV rays are not going through. So any plants going from the house outside have to be placed in shade for a while. Ideally I bring them out during a cloudy week.
Title: Re: TPS 2019
Post by: nathanp on 2019-03-23, 05:27:41 PM
There are a lot of synonymous names for the most common blue potato

Quote
All Blue, Syn. Congo, Congo Black, Russian Blue, British Columbia Blue, McIntosh Black, River John Blue, Sharon's Blue, Blue Marker (Jewett). Probable synonyms: Blue Congo (Blaue Kongo, Blaue Schweden), Congo Blue, Purple Congo, Nova Scotia Blue, Blue of Sweden, Fenton Blue, Himalayan Black, Black Russian, Davis Purple, Eureka Purple, Purple Mountain, Shaw #7.  If this is not confusing enough, in Europe, there are two Congo cultivars (homonyms). The other one has white flowers, making it quite distinct from this one.
Parentage: Unknown, but most authorities suspect All Blue originated in the US or the UK (Scotland) in the late nineteenth century

http://www.tuckertaters.com/p_d_all_blue.html (http://www.tuckertaters.com/p_d_all_blue.html)
Title: Re: TPS 2019
Post by: esoteric_agriculture on 2019-04-06, 09:10:38 AM
I’m aiming to plant out at least 200 TPS seedlings this year. I potted up the seedlings last weekend into deep 32 cell Nursery type trays and added 8 cubic yards of compost to the 100x10 feet bed designated for 2019 potatoes and tilled it all well. All seed was from a generous trade from Oxbow Farms. Varieties are Magic Dragons, Unknown Diploid,Tree Leaves Mix, Cthulhu’s Jockstrap, Careta Amarilla, Bountiful, Shetland Black # 4 and # 5, Katahdin, and I think one more.😉 I’m super excited to grow these out. I’ve grown TPS before, but not for several years. I had previously grown Magic Dragons, Goldsegen, and Marron Bells.
Title: Re: TPS 2019
Post by: Oxbow Farm on 2019-04-08, 05:09:26 AM
I've got about 10 TPS lines started, all but one are germinated at this point.  All stuff from the KPP seed train.  I also am going to do a germination trial of the TLSF 17 seed I produced last year, I processed the seed using two different methods, one lot with trisodium phosphate 10% solution and the other with a saturated CaOH solution.  Both methods rapidly cleaned the seed gel from the seeds, but I don't know if the CaOH is too harsh a treatment that might have damaged or killed the seed.  I'm not actually interested in growing out any TLSF 17 TPS this year, so I'm not going to count it in my grow out list. 
Title: Re: TPS 2019
Post by: bill on 2019-04-08, 11:19:15 AM
I'll be growing about 5600 seedlings this year, belonging to 88 lines.  About 70% of that is andigena (of which it is about 80% tetra and 20% diploid), 20% modern, and 10% wild species and wild/domesticated crosses.  I'm hoping to find about 120 to advance to second year trials from that.

About 30% is already planted out, but the weather got pretty wet over the last week and is holding up the process.  I will now have to rush to get everything in the ground before they grow too large.
Title: Re: TPS 2019
Post by: Doro on 2019-04-10, 01:53:06 AM
I'm just starting to give the seedlings their first pots. The total number is still unknown, but I already know it's more than I should grow lol as always.
So far it's just one line that's potted up, with 30 plants remaining, after discarding 11 weaklings. Might discard another 5.
Probably around 200-300 in total... I need to borrow a rotavator when the ground finally thaws.
Title: Re: TPS 2019
Post by: B. Copping on 2019-04-11, 11:57:55 AM
Well, as intriguing variety names go, I think ‘Cthulhu’s Jockstrap’ is...fantastic!

I’ll suggest ‘Lovecraft’s Wedgies’ if anyone needs a name for a chipping variety that they have developed. :D

(No space in the garden for tps this year, alas.)

I’m aiming to plant out at least 200 TPS seedlings this year. I potted up the seedlings last weekend into deep 32 cell Nursery type trays and added 8 cubic yards of compost to the 100x10 feet bed designated for 2019 potatoes and tilled it all well. All seed was from a generous trade from Oxbow Farms. Varieties are Magic Dragons, Unknown Diploid,Tree Leaves Mix, Cthulhu’s Jockstrap, Careta Amarilla, Bountiful, Shetland Black # 4 and # 5, Katahdin, and I think one more.😉 I’m super excited to grow these out. I’ve grown TPS before, but not for several years. I had previously grown Magic Dragons, Goldsegen, and Marron Bells.
Title: Re: TPS 2019
Post by: reed on 2019-04-13, 04:26:42 AM
I broke down and planted some TPS the other day. I was cleaning out paths and pilling the weeds/soil up to rot and decided to hollow out the middle, throw in some compost and just direct seed. Put in about 25 of my White Superior, all 15 or so of a little blue one. No idea of what kind the blue one is, it came from Joseph's bountiful mix and only other one that has made seeds for me. For good measure I added some from Oxbow farm whose tag said they produce berries in hot weather.

The whole thing is about 7 feet long and three feet wide, assuming they come up I'll thin out to ten or so plants and see what they do. I'm leaving the decision whether or not to keep growing TPS in coming seasons up to these seeds.

Like I said potatoes are getting harder and harder to grow here, plus I don't have good storage to overwinter tubers and I don't like digging potatoes. All that said I would not all be opposed to a line that could be grown as a true seed annual, even if they did only produce small tubers. Wonder if that is even remotely possible.


Title: Re: TPS 2019
Post by: Ferdzy on 2019-04-13, 12:04:42 PM
Is a true seed-grown annual potato possible?

It might be. We have some seeds that were given to us by Duane Falk, a breeder who used to work at U of Guelph. They were from potatoes he acquired in Latvia. They produced - literally - buckets of seed balls and he was handing them out by the handful to people who attended a workshop he had.

Workshop write-up here: https://seasonalontariofood.blogspot.com/2015/10/an-organic-potato-seed-production-and.html

We've grown out a few of those seeds each year for a couple of years now. It seems like in each batch of, say, about 100 seeds that we plant, we get 2 or 3 that grow so prodigiously that the yield is as good a planting a clone piece of an established variety or better. So far, the bad news is that the flavour seems to range between ho-hum and terrible. I believe we do have tubers from one that was both prolific and decent tasting. We plan to continue to sow seed from this source and keep the most productive and flavourful, and then let them cross again - the ultimate result may very well be consistenly good and productive potatoes that can be grown directly from seed. Or not; who knows. But given their behaviour thus far it doesn't seem like that crazy an idea.

You can see some of our seed-grown potatoes in this post here: https://seasonalontariofood.blogspot.com/2018/10/crazy-about-potato-seedlings.html
Title: Re: TPS 2019
Post by: triffid on 2019-04-16, 04:02:27 AM
Bought some seeds from Germany and sowed them yesterday - my first foray into the world of TPS. Their ancestry is a mystery, and I don't really know what I'm doing, but I'm excited.

Regarding true seed-grown annuals, this Dutch company is marketing a variety of F1 seed they claim crops in one season http://www.bejo.com/magazine/bejo-introduces-its-first-true-potato-seed-variety
Title: Re: TPS 2019
Post by: reed on 2019-04-16, 09:11:07 AM
I'm surprised that the idea of potatoes as a seed grown annul has real possibility, and delighted. I'm also surprised to see a lot of my seeds which I planted on the 10th, just six days ago are sprouted. If nothing else I'v discovered that direct seeding works. Just one so far of the blue ones has sprouted and none yet of the heat tolerant but enough of the white superior they will have to be thinned. 

I'm actually a little conflicted on how I want it to turn out. From what I understand the white superior seeds were a bit of an anomaly and although other white superior plants bloomed that year, they all came from two berries on just one plant. On the one hand keeping them pure, for now at least, has it's plus side but for diversity it might be best if they get crossed. If there is any potential for turning into a seed grown line I guess crossing is best but what ever they do is up the them I reckon. I also planted a big row of white superior seed tubers so maybe they they will all bloom together.
Title: Re: TPS 2019
Post by: Doro on 2019-04-16, 11:22:30 AM
I think a true seed annual line is totally possible. Most TPS plants make a decent crop in their first year. Some even make a really good crop in the same range as tuber grown plants. So why not :)
Direct seeding is something I would have difficulties with, just because my soil is sprouting a sea of lambsquarter and my short season. But if you don't have terrible amounts of fast growing weeds and a long growing season, direct seeding should be no problem.

I'm still not done with choosing keepers and repotting. But there is still old snow in the garden, so no real hurry. Probably another month until they can be planted out. Mid May seems realistic for last night frosts, spring is late this year.
Title: Re: TPS 2019
Post by: reed on 2019-04-17, 04:36:21 AM
The only other time I grew TPS it was a diverse mix. I had a lot of small potatoes, several in range of about quarter sized and lots of smaller. Some made a lot of them so despite being small you could still get a meal or two from a hill. There were a few the size of chicken eggs. Most all of them tasted good and most bloomed but only the one that made the little blue potatoes made any seeds and it was just one berry's worth.

All mine are up now, not all the seeds have sprouted  but enough of all three kinds to more than fill out the little plot. It's small enough I can easily cover it if we get a late freeze and easy to keep watered when it gets hot.

I guess if they are willing, I'll have a new breeding project.
Title: Re: TPS 2019
Post by: bill on 2019-04-18, 02:32:33 PM
It is hard to get a useful yield when direct seeding and the mortality rate is high.  Seedling development is so slow that the plants often don't have a chance to produce before the end of the season.  Obviously, this depends on climate.  I think it is pretty easy to work on a two year schedule though.  You could grow seedlings in a bed, perhaps with some protection, and then use the small tubers for seed the following year.  Those plants would produce normally.  Many people grow in pots the first year to get minitubers.
Title: Re: TPS 2019
Post by: Ferdzy on 2019-04-18, 02:42:26 PM
It occurs to me that one of the barriers to a seed-grown potato, at least here in Canada, is legal. As I described in my first blog post, after the Lenape potato killed a number of people through its high level of glycoalkaloids all potatoes must be registered in order to be commercially sold, and that involves paying $750 (last figure I heard, don't know if still accurate) for the testing.
Title: Re: TPS 2019
Post by: bill on 2019-04-18, 02:50:04 PM
Nobody was killed by Lenape.  A breeder who overindulged got a bit sick.  They sent it off for a TGA count and it came back at about three times the safety limit (65 mg/100g).  You would still have to eat a huge amount at that concentration to die.

It seems silly to test every variety.  It is pretty rare for domesticated potatoes to come out bitter.  Lenape was a cross that included the wild species S. chacoense, which typically has very high TGA.
Title: Re: TPS 2019
Post by: reed on 2019-04-18, 06:09:11 PM
It is hard to get a useful yield when direct seeding and the mortality rate is high.  Seedling development is so slow that the plants often don't have a chance to produce before the end of the season.  Obviously, this depends on climate.  I think it is pretty easy to work on a two year schedule though.  You could grow seedlings in a bed, perhaps with some protection, and then use the small tubers for seed the following year.  Those plants would produce normally.  Many people grow in pots the first year to get minitubers.
I think my biggest problem will likely be heat and drought. I'v already watered them a couple times and if we don't get tonight's predicted rain will do so again tomorrow. I'm sure there is plenty of moisture deep in the ground but those tiny seedlings don't have enough roots to find it yet and the sun and wind are really drying the surface up. The plants don't even have any true leaves yet. I'm thinking if I can nurse them trough till they get better established and keep em mulched good later in the season, they might just make a little bit of something.

Is TGA the same thing that gives that awful taste if a potato skin has been exposed to light and turns green?
Title: Re: TPS 2019
Post by: Ferdzy on 2019-04-18, 06:28:55 PM
Bill; Duane Falk seemed to think that some people had died from eating it; old people in a nursing home that excess potatoes were donated to. It's true that the increased death-rate while they were being served was likely not absolutely linkable to it. But whether it killed people or just made Gary Johnston sick doesn't change the fact that in Canada, it is legally required to register new potato varieties if you are going to sell them.

Here's a page about doing so. Appendix V about half way down deals with potatoes.
http://www.inspection.gc.ca/plants/variety-registration/registration-procedures/guidance-document/eng/1411564219182/1411564268800?chap=0#s20c3

Reed; I assume TGA is an abbreviation for glycoalkaloids, in which case yes.

We've had the best success by starting our seeds in pots in the spring, transplanting them at the earliest opportunity, and then we water them quite a lot because our soil is so sandy and dries out so fast.
Title: Re: TPS 2019
Post by: esoteric_agriculture on 2019-04-18, 06:47:41 PM
TPS seedlings planted last night. 200 seedlings in the ground. No temperature forecast lower than 44 for any extended forecast I’ve seen here, so I decided to plant. Ground was dry enough for good planting, 1-2 inches of rain forecast here tomorrow night, ideal situation. A hard or killing freeze is at this point extremely unlikely here, light freeze maybe, but the plants will recover from that. Plants were perfect stage to transplant, rooted but not root bound. Maybe 2 plants had any visible microtubers, rest only fibrous roots or stolons. My experience in this climate is that potatoes need planted as early as possible so they can grow and establish before hot dry weather and potato eating pests show up.
Title: Re: TPS 2019
Post by: bill on 2019-04-18, 07:01:15 PM
Is TGA the same thing that gives that awful taste if a potato skin has been exposed to light and turns green?

Yes, TGA = total glycoalkaloids.  You might find this helpful:
https://www.cultivariable.com/potato-glycoalkaloid-toxicity/
Title: Re: TPS 2019
Post by: bill on 2019-04-18, 07:04:49 PM
Bill; Duane Falk seemed to think that some people had died from eating it; old people in a nursing home that excess potatoes were donated to. It's true that the increased death-rate while they were being served was likely not absolutely linkable to it.

That's interesting.  I did quite a bit of research a couple years back for my glycoalkaloid article and found basically no published accounts of glycoalkaloid poisoning in modern times from eating tubers (there are a few associated with eating other parts of the plant).  It does seem that nursing home patients might be more vulnerable, so that makes some sense.  They must have kept it pretty quiet if so, but the 1970s was a different time.
Title: Re: TPS 2019
Post by: bill on 2019-04-18, 07:12:35 PM
Here's a page about doing so. Appendix V about half way down deals with potatoes.
http://www.inspection.gc.ca/plants/variety-registration/registration-procedures/guidance-document/eng/1411564219182/1411564268800?chap=0#s20c3

It looks like there is an exception for "Home Garden Varieties" that are grown on less than 1 hectare.  That ought to accommodate most small breeding.
Title: Re: TPS 2019
Post by: Ferdzy on 2019-04-18, 07:24:14 PM
It looks like there is an exception for "Home Garden Varieties" that are grown on less than 1 hectare.  That ought to accommodate most small breeding.

Ah? I didn't see that. (I still don't to be honest, but maybe I'm a little mesmerized by the fact that they want data via slides or CD.) But yes, that would solve the problem.

Title: Re: TPS 2019
Post by: bill on 2019-04-18, 08:00:08 PM
You have to piece it together from a couple other documents.  You can see it defined in the glossary on that page.  You can then find other docs with that term, but they don't go into a lot of detail.
Title: Re: TPS 2019
Post by: nathanp on 2019-04-18, 09:34:17 PM
I do not believe there are any reputably documented stories of anyone being harmed by TGA of any cultivated potatoes.  The most that is likely to occur is being sick.  I run into an occasional potato from TPS that is strongly bitter to my tongue (I taste the skins before cooking tubers from TPS). In which case I generally discard it.  I have run into two potatoes that have made me slightly ill, and the extent of that is having an upset stomach.  One is a landrace cultivar from coastal Chili called Papa Chonca, the other was a TPS seedling of mine.  In both cases eating the potatoes was fine until I ate a higher quantity of them, with no other food being eaten.  Both can easily be eaten by most people who are eating other foods or potatoes with them.  I have eaten both of them multiple times since then with no problems.  I probably do have a few others that have slightly high TGA, but we eat those with no problems or health concerns.

Wild potatoes aside, I think the percentage of TPS seedlings that I discard for concerns over TGA, has been somewhere between 0.2-0.3%% of seedlings.  Many of those I am growing also do have wild potatoes in their pedigrees.
Title: Re: TPS 2019
Post by: Doro on 2019-04-19, 01:41:59 AM
@Reed New plantbreeding projects are like rabbits ;D they multiply quickly.
What mulch material do you have available? I stay away from wood shavings or sawdust because they keep the soil cool, but they might be ideal in your situation if you apply them early.

I'm finally done repotting, 216 made it through the first round of selecting. Weak seedlings got discarded and I preferably kept seedlings showing colour in stems and leafs.
Highland Burgundy Red x Blå Congo gave the strongest seedlings, it had the biggest percentage of keepers. Seems like that cross was a good one.
I also got 2 freak plants from Heiderot Second gen. Kept them for now even though they are kind of small. Very narrow leafs that remind me of carrot leaf in tomato plants. It will be interesting to see how they develop through the season. Has anyone else seen carrot leaf in potatoes before? It is new to me.

Being in Europe I'm not able to sell any of my bred veg commercially. Basicly everything needs a license. I breed anyways, just because. Could sell things as ornamentals though lol

I'm not worried about glycoalkaloids, they taste horrible. Found one bitter one last year, a fairly unpleasant surprise biting into it. Any dangerous levels will not go unnoticed at the first taste test. I microwave them with very little water to not wash out things during boiling in a pot of water.
Title: Re: TPS 2019
Post by: reed on 2019-04-19, 03:01:07 AM
I don't bring much of anything extra into my garden, got burned on that a several years back with some horse manure and I don't trust bringing in hay or straw either. I do have a big pile of composting wood chips that I may start using. It came from the electric company when they cleared the lines along my road and I know nothing nasty has been sprayed or applied to it. It's been there three years now and is turning into some pretty good stuff.  Generally I just use what ever I scrounge up around the place.  Weeds that I pull, spent plats like bean vines or corn stalks and grass clippings.

When I cleanup my paths I use a sharp hoe to scrape the ground and end up  with green weeds mixed with soil. A pile of that hollowed out in the middle and filled with finished compost is what my little TPS patch is growing in. It's still a little depressed in the middle, I figure as they grow I'll fill in with more good compost and then mulch the whole thing with grass or the rotting wood chips. Trying to keep the ground a little cooler is a big part of it, along with conserving moisture.

Potatoes grow fine here, IF there is good rains but I'v had a couple near total crop failures in last few years from heat and drought.  That's why I had decided not to put much effort into them but I had those seeds and I had that pile of path scrapings so thought what the heck, might as well give it another try.

I'm not worried about the TGA either, I think I'm kind of hypersensitive to that awful taste. I'll just discard everything including seeds from any plant that makes potatoes with even a tiny hint of it. Poison or not, to me anything that tastes like that isn't fit to eat.   
Title: Re: TPS 2019
Post by: reed on 2019-04-27, 07:17:15 AM
Here are some of my wee little TPS plants in my giant 3' x 7' patch. Little critters are slow to take off good but looks like the beginning of some true leaves. I'm wondering how long to wait to thin them out a little. I figure ideally they should probably be about a foot apart but I would only have seven left if I did that so i think I'll go with 6 - 8 inches. Hopefully that will be enough to see how they produce and to get some seeds.

About 1/2 of the patch is self pollinated White Superior, a variety we like a lot. 1/4 is the blue one from Joseph's mix and the only other one I ever got my own seeds from. The last 1/4 is the one form Oxbow Farm, described as tolerating heat. I have no clue of the genetics of any of them, just taking my chances they might cross, assuming they bloom.

I also have big row of tuber planted White Superior which are up good and unlikely to bloom along with these but I saves a few to plant later. And I have more White Superior TPS to plant next year.

Since potatoes are getting so iffy here with hot dry weather and limited ability to water, plus we don't have good overwinter storage I'll be real excited if they make something decent to eat ( from seed) even if it is just a little.

Direct seeding may not be optimal as far as production but it was pretty easy and I'm all about easy, will see how it turns out. 

Title: Re: TPS 2019
Post by: esoteric_agriculture on 2019-04-30, 04:02:26 PM
TPS UPDATE-
I covered my potato seedlings with frost blankets Sunday night, as a frost was forecast. We did get a light frost, potato seedlings were very lightly burned on leaf margins and tips of newest growth only. Certainly nothing they won’t recover from in a week. Today the high was nearly 80, so growth should be strong now. Interestingly there was more damage to the diploids than the tetraploids.
Title: Re: TPS 2019
Post by: PaulJ on 2019-05-04, 11:59:17 AM
TPS were a big loss this year sprouted around 30 seeds 6 made it then fungus gnats took out all but one which is side shooting now and doing well
Ill look forward to seeing what you get as my possibilities are limited : )
Title: Re: TPS 2019
Post by: bill on 2019-05-05, 09:32:59 PM
Interestingly there was more damage to the diploids than the tetraploids.

Most diploids are low dormancy phureja types, which were developed at lower elevations in the Andes.  They tend to have good heat tolerance and poor frost tolerance.  High dormancy stenotomum type diploids are the opposite, but much less common.
Title: Re: TPS 2019
Post by: reed on 2019-05-14, 04:15:46 AM
Well, a couple of my little plants did indeed croak. And ah um, most of the rest turned out to be volunteer pimpinellifolium tomatoes. I plucked the tomatoes out and now have a grand total of three TPS plants but they look pretty  good so I'll see how they turn out. 
Title: Re: TPS 2019
Post by: Mike Jennings on 2019-05-14, 06:39:44 PM
This year was the largest number of TPS lines I have planted. I had to scale back on space a little this year, so I only planted 6 seeds of each line. Germination was good, so I still ended up with more plants than can fit in my garden. I seeded them on 1/24/19, up-potted them once, and put them in the ground around late-March/early April. Our last frost was 2/27/19, and I would have liked to get them in the ground earlier, but we had so much rain that my garden was flooded until late-March.

A lot of my TPS plants are starting to flower and I have been cross pollinating them by hand (although bumblebees have been visiting them as well). I am really hoping to increase my production of TPS this year. So far, it's looking good. I have berries forming already on a lot of the plants from last years tubers.

Here's my list:
(Tetraploid)
Blue Belle
Skagit Wow
Riverwood
Shetland Pink
TLSF Pink
TLSF 12-17
Fenton Blue
Pinto
Papa Cacho

(Diploid)
Careta Amarilla
Chaucha Amarilla
Criolla Rosada
Round Burgundy
Skagit Valley Gold
Cultivariable Low Dormancy Diploid Mix

Title: Re: TPS 2019
Post by: esoteric_agriculture on 2019-05-16, 12:50:24 PM
Current update- had over 3” ( 8cm) rain the past week, and 3 nights in the lower 40’s F. ( 5 C) . Potatoes look ok still, desperately need hilled but soil is too wet to move around. I got a tractor sunk to the axels in mud last night right next to the potato row. The ruts filled up with water immediately. Hopefully things dry out some before anything rots. Will hill up the plants as soon as moisture situation allows.
Title: Re: TPS 2019
Post by: rowan on 2019-05-17, 12:41:21 AM
With unusually warm weather for this time of year - jeese it's nearly winter here, only a single light frost so far, and barely any rain my second tps potato crop is still growing their tubers and flowering strongly.  By now I should have harvested small tubers from this crop but I am still impatiently waiting for frosts to kill off the tops.

I harvested mini tubers from these tps plants a few months ago and now I will be able to assess them properly. As long as the frosts hold off the tubers will continue to grow, but it is just so tempting to dig at them to see :)

I have some really good ones that will be kept for next season. Here are a few and I will have some more pics later at harvest. I am very pleased with these ones as they seem to be good producers in my poor soil, and taste great:
Title: Re: TPS 2019
Post by: Doro on 2019-05-17, 02:09:30 PM
They look great!

I'm just done with planting out, frost nights made me keep them in the greenhouse for longer than I would have liked. Didn't plant them all, culled about 25%, but it's still plenty enough plants and I'm not sure if I dare to really count them hahaha.
Title: Re: TPS 2019
Post by: esoteric_agriculture on 2019-05-23, 08:06:08 AM
I managed to get my TPS potatoes hilled up for a second time last night. About 25% of the diploids are flowering now, and one or two of the tetraploids. So far the diploids are substantially larger, and all are starting to send up stolons like crazy. The deluge we’ve had has killed off maybe 6-8 plants, mostly tetraploids. No signs of disease or insects so far. I’ll try to get some pictures this weekend, the flowers are really lovely.
Title: Re: TPS 2019
Post by: spacecase0 on 2019-05-25, 12:08:42 AM
of all the TSP I have grown,
only one over wintered
it is growing happily in my garden
I had hoped that I had more than one that got anywhere
Title: Re: TPS 2019
Post by: Lauren on 2019-05-26, 09:06:06 AM
I planted about 30 seeds and got five plants out in the garden. Still tiny, but OK so far. This is the first year I've gotten anything to plant, although I've been trying for about four years. If I can get seeds (or seed potatoes) from any of the five, I'll be OK. Otherwise just keep planting and trying until I run out of seeds.
Title: Re: TPS 2019
Post by: Doro on 2019-05-26, 03:59:16 PM
We had a cool week here with nights at 2-5C and days 10-15C. Some good rain too, probably around 90mm. The rain measuring tube overflowed lol so I don't know exactly. Next week seems to be the same, not much sunshine ahead.
So far growth is slow but steady, no transplant losses.